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Chemical Weapons Convention

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NEWS
February 5, 1997
BY PUTTING an important treaty banning chemical weapons on hold, Sen. Jesse Helms, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, is putting President Clinton, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and Senate majority leader Trent Lott on the spot.By April 29, this arms pact will come into force -- even if the United States has failed to ratify it. Washington would have no part in staffing or implementing the treaty's enforcement. The American chemical industry would be put at a competitive disadvantage.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
— After months of waiting, a team of chemists and engineers from Aberdeen Proving Ground is now ready to begin the historic destruction of Syria's chemical weapons, the Pentagon said Thursday. The work is to take place aboard a container ship specially fitted with equipment to neutralize Syrian stocks of the World War I blister agent sulfur mustard and the sarin precursor DF. The team of some 64 civilians from the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground sailed from Italy on Wednesday for an undisclosed location in international waters, where they plan to destroy the materials under heavy international guard.
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NEWS
By GEORGE F. Will | May 1, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The president's sugary Philadelphia ''summit'' on volunteerism suggests a political era of good feeling or, what is much the same thing, an era of no thinking. However, last week there was a welcome sign of seriousness -- an infusion of ill will into the political argument. Unfortunately for Republicans, it is within their ranks.Shortly before the Senate ratified the Chemical Weapons Convention, the man who made ratification possible, Trent Lott of Mississippi, his patience sorely tried, approached another Republican on the Senate floor to complain about how hard it is to get along with conservatives.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
A team of scientists at Aberdeen Proving Ground may play a critical role in helping the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which recently won the Nobel Peace Prize, disarm Syria's stockpile of chemical weapons. In a squat brick building surrounded by two layers of chain-link fence topped with razor wire, the U.S. Army's Forensic Analytical Center is capable of dissecting samples of suspected or destroyed chemical weapons. It is one of 21 labs around the world certified to work with the organization to confirm the presence of nerve agents and other chemical weapons.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | March 24, 1995
London -- Periodically, the world is rudely awakened to the awfulness of chemical weapons, and, just as periodically, it goes back to sleep. But after Tokyo, must history again repeat itself?Perhaps what happened in the Tokyo subway this week is just a trial run for a full-scale chemical blitz on the New York subway or the London tube. Perhaps, too, we really have to worry less about expensive ''star wars'' systems to forestall a nuclear missile bombardment and more about a suitcase nuke or chemicals in a shopping bag.Concern is necessary, but perhaps with a sense of proportion.
NEWS
By George F. Will | September 8, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Some good will come of Saddam Hussein's latest misbehavior if it convinces 34 senators to do the right, if uncomfortable, thing by blocking ratification of the Chemical Weapons Convention. Ratification, which will be voted on this week, would be an act of conspicuous unseriousness, deepening the tendency of democracies to disconnect rhetoric from reality.President Clinton displayed that tendency when he explained the U.S. attacks on Iraq: ''When you abuse your own people or threaten your neighbors you must pay a price.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2003
If U.S. troops entering Baghdad encounter Iraqi soldiers hiding among civilians, President Bush has authorized them to use tear gas to try to reduce casualties. But if they do, the U.S. military may be accused by other countries of violating the international ban on chemical weapons - an ironic prospect in a war whose goal is to rid Iraq of weapons of mass destruction. The United States has long asserted that the Chemical Weapons Convention permits the use of tear gas to save lives when soldiers and civilians are tangled together in battle.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
A team of scientists at Aberdeen Proving Ground may play a critical role in helping the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which recently won the Nobel Peace Prize, disarm Syria's stockpile of chemical weapons. In a squat brick building surrounded by two layers of chain-link fence topped with razor wire, the U.S. Army's Forensic Analytical Center is capable of dissecting samples of suspected or destroyed chemical weapons. It is one of 21 labs around the world certified to work with the organization to confirm the presence of nerve agents and other chemical weapons.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
— After months of waiting, a team of chemists and engineers from Aberdeen Proving Ground is now ready to begin the historic destruction of Syria's chemical weapons, the Pentagon said Thursday. The work is to take place aboard a container ship specially fitted with equipment to neutralize Syrian stocks of the World War I blister agent sulfur mustard and the sarin precursor DF. The team of some 64 civilians from the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground sailed from Italy on Wednesday for an undisclosed location in international waters, where they plan to destroy the materials under heavy international guard.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | September 12, 2013
"One does not sharpen the axes after the right time; after the time they are needed. " - Russian Proverb The late Ukrainian violinist Mischa Elman is considered one of the greatest of all time, but he has nothing on Russian President Vladimir Putin, who has played the Obama administration better than any musician. Washington is astounded at what happened over two days this week on the Syria front. First, there was a supposed faux pas on Monday in London by Secretary of State John Kerry, who said the only way Syria could avoid a military strike was to give up its chemical weapons.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
In a world of tanks and fighter jets, chemical hazard detection devices aren't exactly high profile. But nothing brings them into the light like a sarin gas attack. Officials at Smiths Detection, which makes detectors locally and overseas that are small enough to take into the field, said they have spotted the firm's units used in Syria as international peacekeepers search for more details about attacks that killed civilians in the war-torn country. "We can't get into, really, specifics of who has our systems or how they're used because of the proprietary nature, but there have been photos that I've seen and others have seen with our LCDs in the hands of U.N. weapons inspectors," said Aaron M. Gagnon, Smiths Detection's director of product management for chemical, biological, trace explosives and radiation protection systems.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | September 12, 2013
"One does not sharpen the axes after the right time; after the time they are needed. " - Russian Proverb The late Ukrainian violinist Mischa Elman is considered one of the greatest of all time, but he has nothing on Russian President Vladimir Putin, who has played the Obama administration better than any musician. Washington is astounded at what happened over two days this week on the Syria front. First, there was a supposed faux pas on Monday in London by Secretary of State John Kerry, who said the only way Syria could avoid a military strike was to give up its chemical weapons.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2003
If U.S. troops entering Baghdad encounter Iraqi soldiers hiding among civilians, President Bush has authorized them to use tear gas to try to reduce casualties. But if they do, the U.S. military may be accused by other countries of violating the international ban on chemical weapons - an ironic prospect in a war whose goal is to rid Iraq of weapons of mass destruction. The United States has long asserted that the Chemical Weapons Convention permits the use of tear gas to save lives when soldiers and civilians are tangled together in battle.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. Will | May 1, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The president's sugary Philadelphia ''summit'' on volunteerism suggests a political era of good feeling or, what is much the same thing, an era of no thinking. However, last week there was a welcome sign of seriousness -- an infusion of ill will into the political argument. Unfortunately for Republicans, it is within their ranks.Shortly before the Senate ratified the Chemical Weapons Convention, the man who made ratification possible, Trent Lott of Mississippi, his patience sorely tried, approached another Republican on the Senate floor to complain about how hard it is to get along with conservatives.
NEWS
February 5, 1997
BY PUTTING an important treaty banning chemical weapons on hold, Sen. Jesse Helms, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, is putting President Clinton, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and Senate majority leader Trent Lott on the spot.By April 29, this arms pact will come into force -- even if the United States has failed to ratify it. Washington would have no part in staffing or implementing the treaty's enforcement. The American chemical industry would be put at a competitive disadvantage.
NEWS
By George F. Will | September 8, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Some good will come of Saddam Hussein's latest misbehavior if it convinces 34 senators to do the right, if uncomfortable, thing by blocking ratification of the Chemical Weapons Convention. Ratification, which will be voted on this week, would be an act of conspicuous unseriousness, deepening the tendency of democracies to disconnect rhetoric from reality.President Clinton displayed that tendency when he explained the U.S. attacks on Iraq: ''When you abuse your own people or threaten your neighbors you must pay a price.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
In a world of tanks and fighter jets, chemical hazard detection devices aren't exactly high profile. But nothing brings them into the light like a sarin gas attack. Officials at Smiths Detection, which makes detectors locally and overseas that are small enough to take into the field, said they have spotted the firm's units used in Syria as international peacekeepers search for more details about attacks that killed civilians in the war-torn country. "We can't get into, really, specifics of who has our systems or how they're used because of the proprietary nature, but there have been photos that I've seen and others have seen with our LCDs in the hands of U.N. weapons inspectors," said Aaron M. Gagnon, Smiths Detection's director of product management for chemical, biological, trace explosives and radiation protection systems.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 30, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Asserting that "nowhere are the dangers of weapons proliferation more urgent than in the Middle East," President Bush proposed yesterday a freeze and eventual ban on surface-to-surface missiles by nations in the region and a halt to their acquiring nuclear-weapons material.He also proposed that the major conventional arms sellers to the Middle East, including the United States, work out a system to prevent "destabilizing" weapons sales, make sure weapons don't fall into the wrong hands and notify one another of certain arms deals.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | March 24, 1995
London -- Periodically, the world is rudely awakened to the awfulness of chemical weapons, and, just as periodically, it goes back to sleep. But after Tokyo, must history again repeat itself?Perhaps what happened in the Tokyo subway this week is just a trial run for a full-scale chemical blitz on the New York subway or the London tube. Perhaps, too, we really have to worry less about expensive ''star wars'' systems to forestall a nuclear missile bombardment and more about a suitcase nuke or chemicals in a shopping bag.Concern is necessary, but perhaps with a sense of proportion.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 30, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Asserting that "nowhere are the dangers of weapons proliferation more urgent than in the Middle East," President Bush proposed yesterday a freeze and eventual ban on surface-to-surface missiles by nations in the region and a halt to their acquiring nuclear-weapons material.He also proposed that the major conventional arms sellers to the Middle East, including the United States, work out a system to prevent "destabilizing" weapons sales, make sure weapons don't fall into the wrong hands and notify one another of certain arms deals.
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