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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- U.S. intelligence agencies have concluded that Libya is building a subterranean chemical-weapons plant capable of producing and storing poison gas, according to government officials.The underground factory remains disguised as part of a water project, but intelligence officials believe its purpose is to augment a vast above-ground chemical complex whose existence was exposed by the West nearly four years ago.The new project was described by administration officials yesterday as a source of significant concern, particularly because of Libya's failure last month to sign a United Nations convention banning chemical weapons.
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NEWS
August 21, 2014
The announcement this week that scientists from Aberdeen Proving Ground have successfully completed the destruction of Syria's most dangerous chemical weapons has left the whole world breathing a little easier. If nothing else it ensures these cruel instruments of mass destruction will never be used against the U.S. or its allies - or against the Syrian people, who have been the main victims of the country's four-year civil war, which already has claimed more than 100,000 lives. Make no mistake: Syrian President Bashar al-Assad didn't turn over his country's chemical weapons to international inspectors last year out of any humanitarian impulse.
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NEWS
By AMY SMITHSON | October 30, 1992
Washington. -- Recent reports from Russia that research on new, more powerful chemical-warfare agents continues unabated are disturbing. The subsequent arrest of three scientists who described the research program to Western and Russian journalists can only fuel suspicions that the Russians' intentions are not benign.The three chemists were said to have breached state security by telling the press that scientists at the top-secret State Union Scientific Research Institute for Organic Chemistry and Technology had discovered a new generation of binary nerve agents in the late 1980s and continued their research on these lethal chemicals at least through January of this year.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2014
A team of scientists from Aberdeen Proving Ground has completed the historic mission of destroying the most dangerous of Syria's declared chemical weapons stocks, Pentagon officials said Monday. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel called Navy Capt. Rich Dromerhauser on Monday morning to congratulate the team of some 64 civilians and contractors aboard the MV Cape Ray, Pentagon spokesman Rear Adm. John Kirby said. The chemists and engineers from the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground worked for more than a month aboard the specially fitted container ship to neutralize 600 tons of chemicals, including the World War I blister agent sulfur mustard and the sarin precursor DF. Officials have said the first-ever shipboard destruction of the weapons, performed under heavy international guard in the Mediterranean Sea, could serve as a model for future efforts to eradicate chemical weapons from the world's arsenals.
NEWS
December 28, 2011
The Sun editorial board is prone to making stupid and inane statements, but the blanket statement that "Iraq had no nuclear, chemical or biological weapons nor any prospects for building them at the time of the invasion" ("Home for Christmas," Dec. 2) may be the stupidest and most easily refutable ever written. UN experts confirmed in 1986 that Iraq had contravened the Geneva Convention by using chemical weapons against Iran. On March 16, 1988, Iraq dropped bombs containing mustard gas, Sarin and Tabun on the Kurdish city of Halabja.
NEWS
September 11, 2013
The current crisis in the Middle East deals with the Syria's use of chemical weapons, but the fact that it is taking place in Syria is immaterial. The problem could be anywhere in Europe, Africa or Asia and be of no less importance ( "Syria: Where's the outrage?" Sept. 3). The issue is not regime change in the middle of a sectarian civil war but the use of deadly gas by a rogue state. We in the free world must not sanction or tolerate in any the use of such horrific weapons. All possible measures must be undertaken to prevent this catastrophe, even if it means punitive or military action against the offender.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2014
A team of civilian specialists from Aberdeen Proving Ground is headed to the Mediterranean Sea for what is being called a historic mission to destroy Syria's chemical warfare stockpile - an effort that could serve as a model in the drive to rid the world of weapons of mass destruction. The 64 civilians and contractors from the Edgewood Area are at the center of an international mission to neutralize up to 700 tons of chemical agents surrendered by the government of Syrian President Bashar Assad.
NEWS
September 17, 2013
While many would argue that there are no rules in war, I feel that a terrible line was crossed with the use of poison gas munitions by the government of Syria on its own civilians. Such wide-scale barbarism demands a U.S. military response, regardless of whether it is in our national interest in its strictest definition, because only we can, and it is clearly the right thing to do. The fact that many of the rebels are anti-American religious fundamentalist is no reason to let a Hitler slaughter civilians if we can help stop him. I am not calling for an American invasion, just a strong military message that such behavior is unacceptable to us, the same way we regard the use of nuclear weapons in battle.
NEWS
October 12, 1992
The decision to delay the incineration of obsolete Army chemical weapons, including 1,500 tons of mustard agent stored at Aberdeen Proving Ground, provides an opportunity to seriously examine alternative means of disposal. And it finally mandates needed citizen input on disposal decisions at APG.Since the Army opted in 1988 for on-site incineration to eliminate these World War II stockpiles at eight U.S. locations, other technologies have been virtually ignored. Until this year, the Army's exploration of "options" mostly focused on how and where to burn.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
— After months of waiting, a team of chemists and engineers from Aberdeen Proving Ground is now ready to begin the historic destruction of Syria's chemical weapons, the Pentagon said Thursday. The work is to take place aboard a container ship specially fitted with equipment to neutralize Syrian stocks of the World War I blister agent sulfur mustard and the sarin precursor DF. The team of some 64 civilians from the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground sailed from Italy on Wednesday for an undisclosed location in international waters, where they plan to destroy the materials under heavy international guard.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
— After months of waiting, a team of chemists and engineers from Aberdeen Proving Ground is now ready to begin the historic destruction of Syria's chemical weapons, the Pentagon said Thursday. The work is to take place aboard a container ship specially fitted with equipment to neutralize Syrian stocks of the World War I blister agent sulfur mustard and the sarin precursor DF. The team of some 64 civilians from the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground sailed from Italy on Wednesday for an undisclosed location in international waters, where they plan to destroy the materials under heavy international guard.
NEWS
June 28, 2014
Are The Sun's editors naive enough to really believe that the last of Syrian chemical weapons have been turned over ( "Muscular diplomacy," June 26)? I think that in the haste to find something to praise President Barack Obama for, you may again find egg on your editorial page. Remember the "red line?" F. Cordell, Lutherville - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
June 25, 2014
In a little-heralded announcement earlier this week, the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons declared that the Syrian government of Bashar Assad had handed over the last 1,300 tons of its declared chemical weapons stockpile to international inspectors. News reports indicate the Syrian stocks of nerve gas and other chemical agents were loaded aboard U.S. ships that will transport them out to sea where they will be destroyed. At a time when the world's attention has been focused on the escalating sectarian conflict spilling across Syria's border into Iraq, the news was one of the few bright spots in an otherwise grim situation.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 23, 2014
As secretary of state, John Kerry has left no doubt that he is ready, willing and able to go anywhere and do anything to make headway in his unenviable pursuit of progress in international stalemates. His perseverance in seeking to salvage the decades-long Israeli-Palestinian peace quest, and to deter Iran's development of nuclear weapons, Syria's use of chemical weapons, and most recently Russia's land-grab in Ukraine, has made him a veritable diplomatic whirling dervish. His diligence and patience, however, have not yet been matched by success in his 15 months in the Obama administration's highest-profile cabinet post.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
At the end of January, chemists and engineers left Aberdeen Proving Ground for the Mediterranean Sea to lead the historic destruction of Syria's chemical weapons. More than two months later, they're still waiting for the mission to start. As the Syrian conflict lurches into a fifth bloody year, the forces of President Bashar Assad appear to have gained the advantage over U.S.-backed rebels. Assad's army, once dismissed as inadequately equipped, ill-prepared for guerrilla fighting and of suspect loyalty, has capitalized on infighting among the rebels and a steady flow of support from Moscow and Tehran to chalk up victory after victory.
NEWS
January 4, 2014
While reading the summary of key 2013 events, when I got to the description that "Syria blinked," I had to blink myself. I assume the writer meant "Syria winked. " At least that's about as much attention as Bashar al-Assad paid to President Barack Obama's red lines - or maybe they were dotted lines free to cross if you doubted any serious consequences. When mounting evidence no longer permitted President Obama to avoid some response, he deftly pirouetted to Congress, asking unnecessary permission to take action ("Atypical images of war," Jan. 2)
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
A team of scientists at Aberdeen Proving Ground may play a critical role in helping the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which recently won the Nobel Peace Prize, disarm Syria's stockpile of chemical weapons. In a squat brick building surrounded by two layers of chain-link fence topped with razor wire, the U.S. Army's Forensic Analytical Center is capable of dissecting samples of suspected or destroyed chemical weapons. It is one of 21 labs around the world certified to work with the organization to confirm the presence of nerve agents and other chemical weapons.
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