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Chemical Warfare

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NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1990
WESTMINSTER - Learning about chemical warfare isn't usually part of the lesson plan for high school students, but the lingering Persian Gulf crisis has moved discussion about today's headlines into many Carroll County classrooms.From social studies to language arts classes, students are learning about the Middle East conflict. Some are receiving brief overviews, while others are delving into its causes and effects.At the same time, a letter-writing campaign to soldiers stationed in the Middle East is gaining momentum at both West Middle School and Westminster High School.
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NEWS
September 17, 2013
While many would argue that there are no rules in war, I feel that a terrible line was crossed with the use of poison gas munitions by the government of Syria on its own civilians. Such wide-scale barbarism demands a U.S. military response, regardless of whether it is in our national interest in its strictest definition, because only we can, and it is clearly the right thing to do. The fact that many of the rebels are anti-American religious fundamentalist is no reason to let a Hitler slaughter civilians if we can help stop him. I am not calling for an American invasion, just a strong military message that such behavior is unacceptable to us, the same way we regard the use of nuclear weapons in battle.
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NEWS
January 30, 1992
When the five veto-bearing members can agree, the United Nations Security Council is a mighty instrument. The Security Council told Iraq to vacate Kuwait; Iraq did not; thanks to the U.N., the U.S. put together the coalition which bombed Iraq and ejected it from Kuwait. That is the precedent that Libya's erratic dictator, Muammar el Kadafi, contemplates while stonewalling a U.N. request to cooperate with French, British and American courts in two airliner bombings.The genteel U.N. language does not specify what is demanded.
NEWS
September 10, 2013
I just got finished hearing President Barack Obama do his quick step dance around the reporters' questions at his so-called news conference in Russia ("Obama feels a chill in Russia," Sept. 6). What an immoral person he is. He has the gall to stand there and present himself as the moral measure for how everyone else should think and act. Meanwhile, he lives his whole life without any moral standards but what he wants to do in the ever changing moment of decision and political opportunity.
NEWS
September 29, 2002
Robert Lee Fox, a chemical warfare researcher with the Army for nearly three decades, died of pneumonia Sept. 22 at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson. He was 95. Dr. Fox spent most of his career at Aberdeen Proving Ground's Edgewood Arsenal, where he helped oversee research and development after World War II until his retirement in 1970. During the war, he served in the Army's Chemical Warfare Service. From 1941 to 1942, he helped conduct warfare research as part of the Manhattan Project at Columbia University in New York.
NEWS
By Joseph L. Galloway and Joseph L. Galloway,U.S. News & World Report | February 22, 1991
The 91st Chemical Company, commanded by Capt. Harmit "Mitti" Randhawa, 28, of Bamberg, S.C., has a "secret weapon" in his arsenal of chemical and biological detection and decontamination gear -- six state-of-the-art German-made M-93 Fox amphibious chemical warfare vehicles.The Fox vehicles, each with a specially trained crew of four, are designed to roam the battlefield, sampling the air and earth for traces of deadly chemical warfare substances.Lt. Bob Campbell, 23, of Troy, N.Y., commands the 24th Division's Fox Recon Platoon and commands one of those six Foxes, which can go more than 80 miles an hour.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 11, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A former U.S. Army sergeant whose life "disintegrated" after he was unwittingly tested with the hallucinogenic drug LSD at Maryland's Edgewood Arsenal in the 1950s should receive $625,000 in compensation from the U.S. government, a Florida congressman told a House subcommittee here yesterday.The House Judiciary Committee's Administrative Law Subcommittee also heard testimony that the LSD testing on the former sergeant, James B. Stanley, and other chemical experiments on thousands of soldiers at Edgewood may have involved former Nazi scientists who worked at the facility between World War II and the 1960s as part of a secret U.S. government project.
NEWS
By Mary Knudson | January 28, 1991
The Defense Department has accelerated production of vaccines against such virulent diseases as anthrax, cholera and typhoid in response to the possibility of biological warfare by Iraq.The intent is to rapidly make enough vaccine to inoculate all U.S. and allied troops in the Persian Gulf, an Army spokesman said yesterday. Inoculations began earlier this month, but the Army found a severe shortage of the vaccines.The military's anthrax vaccine is being produced by the Michigan Department of Public Health, which has been making anthrax vaccine for 25 years for use by workers who process animal hides and face the risk of contracting the disease from contaminated hides.
NEWS
By LAURA BARNHARDT and LAURA BARNHARDT,SUN REPORTER | April 13, 2006
Three Aberdeen Proving Ground employees were sent to a post medical clinic for observation yesterday after a brief power failure might have exposed them to chemical warfare agents that they had been experimenting with, a spokesman for the Army facility said. The electrical problem was the second in as many days that could have exposed employees at the Harford County Army facility to deadly chemicals. Yesterday's power failure, reported just before 2 p.m., affected only four laboratories in the building, said George Mercer, an APG spokesman.
NEWS
February 2, 1994
"What they are waiting for is for all of us to die and forget about it," says an old man who served as a human guinea pig for chemical warfare testing by the U.S. military.He and thousands of others who were exposed to harmful chemicals in tests at Edgewood Arsenal, Baltimore's Fort Holabird and the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington during the 1940s are seeking compensation for their illnesses and disabilities that they link to war-era secret experiments.Slowly the government has taken up their claims, after decades of denial and exculpatory studies, finally compiling a list of medical conditions connected to severe exposures to chemicals such as mustard agent and arsenic compounds during World War II testing.
NEWS
September 9, 2013
The conflict in Syria is a horrific human tragedy: 100,000 dead, 2 million refugees and now, chemical warfare. I can sympathize with the impulse to "do something" about it ("Where is the outrage?" Sept. 4). However, this intervention, no matter how "limited," will have grave consequences. The fact is that nations such as Iran and Russia are supporting the Assad regime, and other nations, such as Saudi Arabia and Turkey, are backing the rebels. Each actor is adding fuel to the fire (which is why, sadly, there are 100,000 dead in Syria)
NEWS
By Faheem Younus | September 3, 2013
Mr. President, you and I having a similar challenge: selling a military strike against Syria as a "moral imperative. " But we have different audiences. Your constituents come from all parts of the country; mine from different parts of the world. Yours are driven by myriad interests; mine are simply seeking justice. Yours are young and old; mine are mostly teenagers. You call yours, "the U.S. Congress. " I call mine "the Younus family. " Mr. President, my nephews and nieces, who live in Pakistan, Canada and elsewhere, buy the fact that Syiran President Bashar Assad should be ousted and held responsible for his reprehensible actions against his own people.
NEWS
January 21, 2007
U.S. Army Chemical Materials Agency employee Gary Hlavsa of Bel Air recently graduated as one of this year's top students of the Naval Postgraduate School. Hlavsa received a master of science in program management. He graduated with distinction from a program with a 97-year history of educating military and civilian personnel. He participated in the class, which originates in California, through video conference connections. He attended graduation ceremonies in Monterey, Calif. Originally from Pittsburgh, Hlavsa earned a bachelor of science in mechanical engineering from West Virginia University.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | November 12, 2006
Brennie Elias Hackley Jr., an Aberdeen Proving Ground scientist who during his more than 50-year career there became a highly regarded expert on the development of medical antidotes for chemical warfare agents, died Nov. 5 of lung cancer at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. The Joppa resident was 82. He was born and raised in Roanoke, Va., one of 10 children. He earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry in 1946 from Wilberforce University in Ohio and a master's degree in organic chemistry from the University of Delaware in 1954.
NEWS
By LAURA BARNHARDT and LAURA BARNHARDT,SUN REPORTER | April 13, 2006
Three Aberdeen Proving Ground employees were sent to a post medical clinic for observation yesterday after a brief power failure might have exposed them to chemical warfare agents that they had been experimenting with, a spokesman for the Army facility said. The electrical problem was the second in as many days that could have exposed employees at the Harford County Army facility to deadly chemicals. Yesterday's power failure, reported just before 2 p.m., affected only four laboratories in the building, said George Mercer, an APG spokesman.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 9, 2002
WASHINGTON - Acknowledging a much wider testing of toxic weapons on its forces, the Defense Department says it used chemical warfare and live biological agents during Cold War-era military exercises on American soil, as well as in Canada and Britain, according to previously secret documents cleared for release to Congress on yesterday. Sixteen of the newly declassified reports, prepared by the Pentagon, describe how chemical and biological exercises, until now undisclosed, used deadly substances such as VX and sarin to test the vulnerability of American forces to unconventional attack.
NEWS
January 21, 2007
U.S. Army Chemical Materials Agency employee Gary Hlavsa of Bel Air recently graduated as one of this year's top students of the Naval Postgraduate School. Hlavsa received a master of science in program management. He graduated with distinction from a program with a 97-year history of educating military and civilian personnel. He participated in the class, which originates in California, through video conference connections. He attended graduation ceremonies in Monterey, Calif. Originally from Pittsburgh, Hlavsa earned a bachelor of science in mechanical engineering from West Virginia University.
NEWS
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | July 21, 1999
Robert Wilson Dorsey, a longtime chemist at the Army's Edgewood Arsenal, died July 12 of a heart ailment at Sinai Hospital. He was 71 and lived in Woodmoor. Mr. Dorsey began his career as a chemist in 1954 after a stint with the Army's Guided Missile Corps in Texas. He took jobs with the National Bureau of Standards and the Montebello Filtration Plant in Baltimore before finding his niche as a research scientist at Edgewood Arsenal in Harford County. During his career at Edgewood, he developed a reputation for his work on projects related to chemical warfare and earned three patents for his inventions.
NEWS
September 29, 2002
Robert Lee Fox, a chemical warfare researcher with the Army for nearly three decades, died of pneumonia Sept. 22 at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson. He was 95. Dr. Fox spent most of his career at Aberdeen Proving Ground's Edgewood Arsenal, where he helped oversee research and development after World War II until his retirement in 1970. During the war, he served in the Army's Chemical Warfare Service. From 1941 to 1942, he helped conduct warfare research as part of the Manhattan Project at Columbia University in New York.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2001
In the United States' preparedness battle against chemical and biological warfare, Aberdeen Proving Ground is a formidable weapon - a point U.S. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski drove home yesterday in a tour of the facility's Edgewood area. "Aberdeen has always been ... the center for developing weapons of war to meet needs for today and the future," the Maryland Democrat said, adding that many research findings at Aberdeen are of "dual use" - valuable to the military and civilians. She said she plans to work with President Bush to keep the post on the leading edge of research and development.
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