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Chemical Spill

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NEWS
July 2, 1993
About a dozen firefighters spent more than 30 minutes early yesterday extinguishing a small fire and cleaned up a chemical spill at a Glen Burnie store.Lt. Robert Kornmann, a county fire department spokesman, said sprinklers inside Aquarium Products, in the 100 block of Penrod Court, contained the blaze and kept it isolated to a small section of a concrete warehouse.As a result, there was minimal damage and no injuries, Lieutenant Kornmann said.Firefighters arrived about 4:15 a.m. and discovered an undetermined amount of the chemical Textone had spilled.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
The only signs investigators found of the chemical-laden railroad hopper car that exploded after it derailed last year in Rosedale were twisted and deformed pieces of its aluminum shell that shot out like shrapnel, landing as far as 370 feet away. "Of the larger wreckage pieces recovered along [adjacent] Lake Drive, was a brake valve weighing about 70 pounds, a piece of aluminum rail car frame, and a fractured piece of burnt rail tie," wrote Paul L. Stancil, the National Transportation Safety Board's senior hazardous materials investigator, in a factual report on the explosion released Monday.
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NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | May 22, 1998
About 50 residents from the South Baltimore neighborhoods of Wagner's Point, Curtis Bay and Brooklyn, joined by several local lawmakers, lambasted state environmental officials and a chemical company last night for their handling of a chemical spill last week.The residents crowded into the Curtis Bay Community Center for what was supposed to be an "informational meeting" on a hazardous-waste renewal permit for FMC Agricultural Products Chemicals.However, the Maryland Department of the Environment's agenda for the meeting was tossed aside as angry residents demanded answers to their questions about the herbicide spill on the site that sent a gas plume over their neighborhoods.
NEWS
Sean Henderson and The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2013
Emergencies involving dangerous chemicals have resulted in at least 156 Maryland hospitalizations and six deaths since 2001, according to information available through a new interactive feature on baltimoresun.com. Chemical safety has been the subject of heightened public awareness following the explosions of a fertilizer plant in West, Texas and a derailed CSX cargo train in Rosedale. This week, the transparency site muckrock.com released national data on such incidents, provided to it by the U.S. Chemical Safety Board.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer Staff writer Larry Carson contributed to this article | June 19, 1993
An article in yesterday's editions of The Sun incorrectl identified the owner of a plane involved in a chemical spill at Baltimore-Washington International Airport. The plane belonged to United Parcel Service.The Sun regrets the error.A chemical spill yesterday morning in the belly of a United Postal Service airplane parked at Baltimore-Washington International Airport sent five people to area hospitals with minor injuries.Effects from the small spill stretched beyond the airport boundaries after a Federal Armored Express truck delivered contaminated packages to Canton Industrial Park in eastern Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2001
A Jacksonville Beach, Fla., couple pulled into an Interstate 95 rest area in Howard County at 8:40 p.m. Monday complaining of symptoms that are associated with exposure to a hazardous chemical, Maryland State Police said yesterday. Gregory Denardis 28, and his wife, Sharyn, 51, had stopped at a rest area in Delaware between 6:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. that was near the site of a sodium hydroxide spill, police said. A stretch of I-95 in Delaware was closed from 7 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. after officials discovered that a truck had leaked the liquid chemical.
NEWS
June 20, 1995
FIREHampstead: Hampstead responded to investigate a possible chemical spill in the 1300 block of North Main Street at 1:21 p.m. Sunday. Units were out 13 minutes.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Sun Staff Writer | May 25, 1995
A report of a chemical spill prompted authorities to close part of the Baltimore Beltway for nearly two hours yesterday and to ask Virginia police to help them find a Texas-bound tanker.The outer loop of the Beltway was closed at Cromwell Bridge Road from about noon to 2 p.m. while hazardous materials workers donned protective suits and sprayed foam on a van suspected of being contaminated with a poisonous chemical. Battalion Chief Mark Hubbard, a spokesman for the Baltimore County fire department, said tests did not confirm the presence of the chemical, benzyl chloride, in the van.Meanwhile, the tanker said to have leaked the chemical drove on, en route to Texas via Interstate 81, police said.
NEWS
April 4, 2006
Pay raise OK'd for next Anne Arundel executive The salary of Anne Arundel County's next top elected official would increase by 27 percent under a measure unanimously approved last night by the County Council. The pay of the county executive - $102,000 - had not been adjusted since before Janet S. Owens took office in 1998, and council members agreed last night that a raise was needed to attract desirable candidates. The executive's salary will jump to $125,000 in 2007 and to $130,000 in 2010.
NEWS
Sean Henderson and The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2013
Emergencies involving dangerous chemicals have resulted in at least 156 Maryland hospitalizations and six deaths since 2001, according to information available through a new interactive feature on baltimoresun.com. Chemical safety has been the subject of heightened public awareness following the explosions of a fertilizer plant in West, Texas and a derailed CSX cargo train in Rosedale. This week, the transparency site muckrock.com released national data on such incidents, provided to it by the U.S. Chemical Safety Board.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | October 5, 2008
Four people were injured early yesterday morning when a tractor-trailer hit another vehicle, overturned and spilled acetone on southbound Interstate 95 in Harford County, prompting road closures during the cleanup and investigation, according to Maryland State Police. Shortly after 2 a.m., the driver of a pickup truck slowed nearly to a stop near the scene of an earlier crash on southbound I-95 south of Route 22, according to a news release. A southbound tractor-trailer rear-ended the pickup and overturned onto the guardrail in the center median, according to the release.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun Reporter | October 13, 2007
Environmental Protection Agency officials said yesterday they will crack down on the owner of a Brooklyn Park plant where 50,000 gallons of hazardous chemicals are stored, after acids and toxic chemicals were found leaking from their tanks into the ground. The action against Consolidated Pharmaceuticals Inc., expected as early as next week, comes on the heels of a $100,000 fine levied by the the state for multiple hazardous-waste violations and a letter Monday from Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold that said the site poses the risk of a "potentially catastrophic fire."
NEWS
By NICK SHIELDS AND JOSH MITCHELL and NICK SHIELDS AND JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTERS | April 14, 2006
Dave Fitzgerald was taking a cigarette break at the Exxon service station in Parkton yesterday afternoon when he looked up and saw a sickly yellowish cloud rising above the trees over Interstate 83. "That can't be good at all," the 18- year-old cashier recalled telling himself. Within minutes, emergency vehicles arrived in response to reports of a chemical explosion and spill in a truck and shut down the Baltimore-Harrisburg Expressway in both directions. Southbound I-83 reopened about 3:30 p.m., but the gridlock on the northbound lanes created a rush-hour headache for commuters and travelers that lasted into early this morning.
NEWS
April 4, 2006
Pay raise OK'd for next Anne Arundel executive The salary of Anne Arundel County's next top elected official would increase by 27 percent under a measure unanimously approved last night by the County Council. The pay of the county executive - $102,000 - had not been adjusted since before Janet S. Owens took office in 1998, and council members agreed last night that a raise was needed to attract desirable candidates. The executive's salary will jump to $125,000 in 2007 and to $130,000 in 2010.
NEWS
By CHING CHING NI and CHING CHING NI,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 5, 2005
BEIJING -- The long-term environmental impact of last month's chemical explosion in northern China that left millions of people without safe drinking water remains to be seen. But the political fallout has begun. Beijing fired its top environmental official Friday in an effort to show accountability for the mishandling of the crisis. More heads are expected to roll, possibly including local party leaders in Jilin province where a petrochemical plant accident spilled 100 tons of benzene and other cancer-causing chemicals into the Songhua River.
NEWS
November 30, 2005
NATIONAL Hurricane season ends today The most active and destructive hurricane season in U.S. history officially ends today, but don't count it over yet. Forecasters christened the year's record-smashing 26th tropical storm Epsilon yesterday, shortly before gathering in Washington and Miami to discuss the 2005 season's historic nature. pg 3a WORLD 5 taken hostage in Iraq Four Western peace activists and a German archaeologist were taken hostage in Iraq. Meanwhile, President Bush said yesterday that a U.S. military pullout from Iraq would be a mistake.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | May 22, 1998
About 50 residents from the South Baltimore neighborhoods of Wagner's Point, Curtis Bay and Brooklyn, joined by several local lawmakers, lambasted state environmental officials and a chemical company last night for their handling of a chemical spill last week.The residents crowded into the Curtis Bay Community Center for what was supposed to be an "informational meeting" on a hazardous-waste renewal permit for FMC Agricultural Products Chemicals.However, the Maryland Department of the Environment's agenda for the meeting was tossed aside as angry residents demanded answers to their questions about the herbicide spill on the site that sent a gas plume over their neighborhoods.
NEWS
November 30, 2005
NATIONAL Hurricane season ends today The most active and destructive hurricane season in U.S. history officially ends today, but don't count it over yet. Forecasters christened the year's record-smashing 26th tropical storm Epsilon yesterday, shortly before gathering in Washington and Miami to discuss the 2005 season's historic nature. pg 3a WORLD 5 taken hostage in Iraq Four Western peace activists and a German archaeologist were taken hostage in Iraq. Meanwhile, President Bush said yesterday that a U.S. military pullout from Iraq would be a mistake.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2001
Baltimore fire officials said yesterday they will improve the city's hazardous materials accident plan, but they reassured the public that they are prepared to respond to chemical accidents. Battalion Chief Hector L. Torres, the Fire Department's spokesman, said the city's plan, written in 1987 and updated in 1999, "doesn't go into specifics, but that doesn't mean we don't have those specifics." "There are a lot of other resources available to us," Torres said in a news conference yesterday.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2001
A Jacksonville Beach, Fla., couple pulled into an Interstate 95 rest area in Howard County at 8:40 p.m. Monday complaining of symptoms that are associated with exposure to a hazardous chemical, Maryland State Police said yesterday. Gregory Denardis 28, and his wife, Sharyn, 51, had stopped at a rest area in Delaware between 6:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. that was near the site of a sodium hydroxide spill, police said. A stretch of I-95 in Delaware was closed from 7 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. after officials discovered that a truck had leaked the liquid chemical.
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