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NEWS
By Brenda M. Afzal and Jenny Levin | May 23, 2010
Beginning in 1971, the President's Cancer Panel has been at the forefront of providing critical information on the status of cancer. For the first time in its nearly 40-year history, the panel has focused on environmentally induced cancers, meaning those that result from exposure to chemicals and pollution. The members concluded in this year's report that "the true burden of environmentally induced cancers has been grossly underestimated" and recommended significant changes to better protect people from cancer-causing chemicals.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
Tina Bahadori says a career at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has given her the chance to achieve something that 25 years in the private sector didn't offer: a legacy. Bahadori's years working for consulting, advocacy and lobbying firms brought her success and money. But as national program director for the EPA's chemical safety and sustainability research, she says, she's effecting change. "There is nothing more rewarding and legacy-building as a scientist who works in the environmental and public health arena," said Bahadori, a chemical and combustion engineer with degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University.
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NEWS
By Keith Scott | February 10, 2010
Like their counterparts across the nation, Baltimore County businesses face difficulties during these tough economic times. Here, we are blessed with many advantages: a skilled work force, dynamic businesses, an increasing number of companies in cutting-edge fields like biotechnology, and one of the world's great natural harbors -- the Port of Baltimore. The mission of the Baltimore County Chamber of Commerce is to promote a diverse and vibrant business community and enhance prosperity for the Baltimore region.
NEWS
By Jim Moran and Paul A. Locke | April 8, 2013
Many Americans would be surprised to learn that chimpanzees are still being used in biomedical research and that millions of other animals are utilized in consumer product and toxicity testing. Others may find a sense of security in knowing that this practice continues to provide information on which chemicals and products are deemed safe. The fact is that it doesn't have to be this way, and there are a number of public health, economic and animal welfare reasons to change our ways. The evolving process by which the U.S. regulates chemicals is important to every American household.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1998
Minutes past 7 p.m. on Oct. 13, Alan Pollock, a 12-year National Transportation Safety Board employee, was at home watching television when a news bulletin reported an explosion at Condea Vista's South Baltimore chemical plant.The accident, which sent five workers and three residents to local hospitals, did not involve a plane or a train, but Pollock called his office anyway. He wanted the NTSB to report the incident to an obscure federal agency: the U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
Tina Bahadori says a career at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has given her the chance to achieve something that 25 years in the private sector didn't offer: a legacy. Bahadori's years working for consulting, advocacy and lobbying firms brought her success and money. But as national program director for the EPA's chemical safety and sustainability research, she says, she's effecting change. "There is nothing more rewarding and legacy-building as a scientist who works in the environmental and public health arena," said Bahadori, a chemical and combustion engineer with degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University.
NEWS
By Jim Moran and Paul A. Locke | April 8, 2013
Many Americans would be surprised to learn that chimpanzees are still being used in biomedical research and that millions of other animals are utilized in consumer product and toxicity testing. Others may find a sense of security in knowing that this practice continues to provide information on which chemicals and products are deemed safe. The fact is that it doesn't have to be this way, and there are a number of public health, economic and animal welfare reasons to change our ways. The evolving process by which the U.S. regulates chemicals is important to every American household.
NEWS
May 4, 2011
While delighted to learn from Michael Hawthorne's article ("Pediatricians Seek Change in Lax Toxic Chemicals Law," April 25) that the American Academy of Pediatrics has joined a national campaign to revise the 1976 Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA), such reform is long overdue. The current TSCA regulatory system especially fails to protect our children, who face higher risks of exposure to toxic chemicals. Because of TSCA, the "innocent until proven guilty" status quo of assessing chemical safety implies that some level of bodily damage, if not an outright tragedy, must occur before chemicals are declared unsafe.
NEWS
October 24, 2001
Publicizing locations of hazardous material gives terrorists a hand The Sun's map of major chemical facilities provided a very convenient overview of toxic chemical concentrations, along with an assessment of their effects ("When chemical safety is a matter of security," Oct. 17). The Sun should give more consideration to the possibility of supporting or encouraging terrorism. Terrorists could certainly have created their own map by correlating public information and asking a few innocent questions.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | August 16, 1998
South Baltimore's heavily industrial Fairfield peninsula has always seen plenty of out-of-town visitors: ship captains bringing in cars, truck drivers carrying oil, railroad engineers taking out chemicals.And now, the Central Intelligence Agency.In the past 18 months, CIA operatives - along with intelligence analysts from the Defense Department, the armed services and the National Security Agency - have become quiet, regular visitors to the FMC Corp. chemical plant here. Their mission is to learn more about chemical plants and how facilities designed to produce agricultural pesticides might be converted to make chemical and biological weapons by countries such as Iraq and India.
NEWS
May 4, 2011
While delighted to learn from Michael Hawthorne's article ("Pediatricians Seek Change in Lax Toxic Chemicals Law," April 25) that the American Academy of Pediatrics has joined a national campaign to revise the 1976 Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA), such reform is long overdue. The current TSCA regulatory system especially fails to protect our children, who face higher risks of exposure to toxic chemicals. Because of TSCA, the "innocent until proven guilty" status quo of assessing chemical safety implies that some level of bodily damage, if not an outright tragedy, must occur before chemicals are declared unsafe.
NEWS
By Brenda M. Afzal and Jenny Levin | May 23, 2010
Beginning in 1971, the President's Cancer Panel has been at the forefront of providing critical information on the status of cancer. For the first time in its nearly 40-year history, the panel has focused on environmentally induced cancers, meaning those that result from exposure to chemicals and pollution. The members concluded in this year's report that "the true burden of environmentally induced cancers has been grossly underestimated" and recommended significant changes to better protect people from cancer-causing chemicals.
NEWS
By Keith Scott | February 10, 2010
L ike their counterparts across the nation, Baltimore County businesses face difficulties during these tough economic times. Here, we are blessed with many advantages: a skilled work force, dynamic businesses, an increasing number of companies in cutting-edge fields like biotechnology, and one of the world's great natural harbors - the Port of Baltimore. The mission of the Baltimore County Chamber of Commerce is to promote a diverse and vibrant business community and enhance prosperity for the Baltimore region.
NEWS
October 24, 2001
Publicizing locations of hazardous material gives terrorists a hand The Sun's map of major chemical facilities provided a very convenient overview of toxic chemical concentrations, along with an assessment of their effects ("When chemical safety is a matter of security," Oct. 17). The Sun should give more consideration to the possibility of supporting or encouraging terrorism. Terrorists could certainly have created their own map by correlating public information and asking a few innocent questions.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2001
When a train loaded with dangerous chemicals derailed and caught fire in a downtown tunnel this summer, Baltimoreans were aghast at the hellish spectacle of black smoke pouring out of sewer grates and manhole covers. But chemical accident experts looked at the train's chemical manifest and breathed a sigh of relief. Thank heaven, they agreed, the accident didn't involve something really dangerous - like a 90-ton tank car filled with potentially deadly chlorine gas. Since Sept. 11, emergency planners here and across the country face a far more unsettling concern: that factories and municipal water and sewage plants could become targets for terrorists.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1998
Minutes past 7 p.m. on Oct. 13, Alan Pollock, a 12-year National Transportation Safety Board employee, was at home watching television when a news bulletin reported an explosion at Condea Vista's South Baltimore chemical plant.The accident, which sent five workers and three residents to local hospitals, did not involve a plane or a train, but Pollock called his office anyway. He wanted the NTSB to report the incident to an obscure federal agency: the U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board.
BUSINESS
By J. Leffall and J. Leffall,SUN STAFF | July 17, 1998
There's something about the ads of several pest control companies in Maryland that is bugging Daniel Pontious and his colleagues at the Maryland Public Interest Research Group.At a news conference yesterday, MaryPIRG released a report that it said was aimed at creating public awareness of what it called false advertising by pest control companies."We initiated an investigation into the marketing practices of pesticide companies in the state by researching yellow page ads placed in 20 phone books," said Pontious, executive director of the group.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | August 16, 1998
South Baltimore's heavily industrial Fairfield peninsula has always seen plenty of out-of-town visitors: ship captains bringing in cars, truck drivers carrying oil, railroad engineers taking out chemicals.And now, the Central Intelligence Agency.In the past 18 months, CIA operatives - along with intelligence analysts from the Defense Department, the armed services and the National Security Agency - have become quiet, regular visitors to the FMC Corp. chemical plant here. Their mission is to learn more about chemical plants and how facilities designed to produce agricultural pesticides might be converted to make chemical and biological weapons by countries such as Iraq and India.
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