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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
Jeffrey F. Bayliss, a chemical engineer who was the president and owner of Spray Drying Systems Inc., died April 2 of complications from cancer at the University of Maryland Medical Center. He was 52. The son of Ronald W. Bayliss, a chemical engineer, and N. Ruth Theisz Bayliss, a homemaker, Jeffrey Francis Bayliss was born and raised in Flemington, N.J. After graduating in 1979 from Hunterdon Central High School, he earned a degree in 1985 in chemical engineering from Pennsylvania State University.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Hamilton G. Walker Jr., a retired chemical engineer who later established a custom furniture making business, died Friday of cancer at his Stevensville home. He was 72. The son of Hamilton G. Walker Sr., a civil engineer, and Mary Mount Walker, a homemaker, Hamilton Gordon Walker Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised in Mount Washington. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1959, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1964 in chemical engineering from the University of Maryland, College Park.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
William A. Hubbard, a retired chemical engineer who headed a Baltimore business that created the orange-colored coatings for Howard Johnson restaurant roofs, died of heart failure Monday at his Towson home. He was 92. Born in Rolla, Mo., he was the son of Noel Hubbard, a University of Missouri registrar, and Ruth Johns Hubbard, a syndicated newspaper artist and journalist. He earned a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering from the University of Missouri in 1944, where he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Tau Beta Pi. Family members said he tried to enlist in the military during World War II but was turned down.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
William A. Hubbard, a retired chemical engineer who headed a Baltimore business that created the orange-colored coatings for Howard Johnson restaurant roofs, died of heart failure Monday at his Towson home. He was 92. Born in Rolla, Mo., he was the son of Noel Hubbard, a University of Missouri registrar, and Ruth Johns Hubbard, a syndicated newspaper artist and journalist. He earned a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering from the University of Missouri in 1944, where he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Tau Beta Pi. Family members said he tried to enlist in the military during World War II but was turned down.
NEWS
October 27, 1993
Donald E. Cordes, 60, a Baltimore native and chemical engineer, died Sunday of cancer at Roper Hospital in Charleston, S.C.He moved to West Ashley, S.C., a suburb of Charleston, in 1982 when he was appointed director of manufacturing for the Balchem Chemical Co. in Green Pond, S.C.Reared in Hamilton, he studied at the McDonogh School and was a 1952 Polytechnic Institute graduate. He earned a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering from the Johns Hopkins University in 1955.He married the former Dorothy George of Baltimore in 1955.
NEWS
October 11, 1997
Armin Wille, a German-born chemical engineer and a former Catonsville resident, died of heart failure Sunday at his home in Port Hope, Mich. He was 61.Mr. Wille had worked for W. R. Grace & Co.'s Davison Chemical Co. division from 1966 until a year ago when he retired and moved to Michigan.Mr. Wille immigrated to the United States with his family when he was 15. He worked at an auto plant in Detroit and at Davison plants in Cincinnati and Lake Charles, La., before he moved to Baltimore. He lived in the Oak Forest neighborhood of Catonsville for 21 years.
NEWS
September 23, 2003
George P. Smith, a retired chemical engineer, died Sunday of a rare form of blood cancer at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air. The Perry Hall resident was 82. Born in Baltimore and raised on South Ellwood Avenue, he was a 1939 graduate of City College and earned an engineering degree from Villanova University in Villanova, Pa. He served in the Navy during World War II and in 1947 became a chemical engineer at Edgewood Arsenal. He worked on the development of air filters to protect against chemical and biological agents.
NEWS
January 25, 2006
John C. Van Horn, a retired chemical engineer and computer enthusiast, died of kidney failure Thursday at the Vantage House Retirement Community in Columbia. He was 86. Mr. Van Horn was born and raised in Indianapolis and earned his bachelor's and master's degrees in chemical engineering from Purdue University - both in 1941. He served aboard a Navy destroyer in the Pacific during World War II, attaining the rank of lieutenant, then joined Dow Chemical Co. He headed its chemical product development division and later served as president of Dow Quimica Argentina in Buenos Aires.
NEWS
June 26, 2002
Nicholas Salvatore Capasso, a retired chemical engineer and volunteer, died of cancer Saturday at Harford Memorial Hospital in Havre de Grace. He was 82. The longtime Bel Air resident began working at Edgewood Arsenal in 1962, where he supervised the development and disposal of chemical and biological munitions. He retired in 1981. After retiring, he was a consultant to Foster-Miller Inc., a Waltham, Mass., engineering firm, and ITT Research Institute in Chicago. Mr. Capasso was born in New York City and raised in Brooklyn, N.Y., where he graduated from Manual Training High School.
NEWS
October 21, 2005
Daniel Frederick Reisenweber, a chemical engineer and World War II veteran, died of BOOP disease, an inflammation of the lungs, Sunday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The longtime Towson resident was 85. Mr. Reisenweber was born and raised in Baltimore and graduated in 1937 from Polytechnic Institute. He began his college studies at the Johns Hopkins University and in the summer of 1941 was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Army. Mr. Reisenweber served in England with the Army and later was commander of Camp Lucky Strike in France, where he oversaw German prisoners of war. He attained the rank of captain and after the war remained active in the Army Reserve, where he was promoted to major.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
Jeffrey F. Bayliss, a chemical engineer who was the president and owner of Spray Drying Systems Inc., died April 2 of complications from cancer at the University of Maryland Medical Center. He was 52. The son of Ronald W. Bayliss, a chemical engineer, and N. Ruth Theisz Bayliss, a homemaker, Jeffrey Francis Bayliss was born and raised in Flemington, N.J. After graduating in 1979 from Hunterdon Central High School, he earned a degree in 1985 in chemical engineering from Pennsylvania State University.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2014
A team of civilian specialists from Aberdeen Proving Ground is headed to the Mediterranean Sea for what is being called a historic mission to destroy Syria's chemical warfare stockpile - an effort that could serve as a model in the drive to rid the world of weapons of mass destruction. The 64 civilians and contractors from the Edgewood Area are at the center of an international mission to neutralize up to 700 tons of chemical agents surrendered by the government of Syrian President Bashar Assad.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
Jean H. Reisenweber, a former secretary who was an active member of the Dulaney Valley Woman's Club, died Sunday from complications of dementia at Lorien Mays Chapel Health Center in Timonium. The longtime resident of Towson's Campus Hills neighborhood was 86. The daughter of an engineer and a volunteer, the former Dorothy Jean Hobson was born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park. After graduating from Western High School, she went to work as a secretary for the Maryland Casualty Co. She was married in 1948 to Daniel F. Reisenweber, a chemical engineer, who died in 2005.
SPORTS
By Matt Bracken and The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
Every offseason in Baltimore, some of the city's top players transfer high schools in search of what they hope is a better basketball situation. From an outsider's perspective, it might have appeared that John Crosby was doing the same when he left City last spring and landed at Poly in the fall. But the 6-foot-3, 186-pound point guard was hardly putting basketball first when he left one of the city's top magnet schools for another. “It was more of an academic decision,” Crosby said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
Rudolph James "Rudy" Redd Sr., an engineer who spent his nearly 40-year career with the Army's Research, Development and Engineering Command at Aberdeen Proving Ground and was an advocate for the mentally ill, died April 27 of a cardiac arrest at his home in the Versailles Apartments in Towson. He was 88. Mr. Redd was born in Charlottesville, Va. After the death of his mother when he was very young, he moved to a home on Druid Hill Avenue, where he was raised by Irene Scott, a close friend of his mother's.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2012
Margery K. Reid, a retired secretary and volunteer, died of a stroke Tuesday at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. She was 89. Margery McShane was born in Baltimore and raised in Bolton Hill. She was a 1938 graduate of Western High School and the Baltimore Business College. She also attended the Maryland Institute College of Art . She was married in 1945 to A. Walter Kraus Jr., who was a partner in the Miles and Stockbridge law firm. After his death in 1955, she went to work in the Maryland Judiciary's Administrative Office.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 19, 2011
At funeral services for Nathan Krasnopoler held at Sol Levinson and Bros. Funeral Home on Aug. 12, the 20-year-old was remembered by a Johns Hopkins University professor for his "keen and incisive intellect. " Mr. Krasnopoler died Aug. 10 at Gilchrist Center in Columbia from a severe irreversible brain injury that he sustained Feb. 20 after being hit by a motorist while riding his bicycle on West University Parkway near the Hopkins Homewood campus. "Nathan was very bright, very creative and very self-motivated," said Edward R. Scheinerman, professor in the Johns Hopkins University Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, who is also vice dean of engineering education at the Whiting School of Engineering.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2011
Robert H. Herrmann, a retired chemical engineer and businessman, died May 23 of heart disease at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. The former Homeland and Cross Keys resident was 91. The son of a chemical dye company executive and a homemaker, Mr. Herrmann was born and raised in Garden City, N.Y. After graduating from Garden City High School in 1937, he earned bachelor's degrees in chemistry in 1941 and chemical engineering in 1942, both from Cornell University.
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