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By Dean Kuipers and Dean Kuipers,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 3, 2005
The Chemical Brothers have crafted an inconsistent coup, an evolution in big beat and sweet dance-pop loyalty as hard-hitting as their mid-'90s works Exit Planet Dust or Dig Your Own Hole. "Galvanize," the first single on Push the Button, makes it plain the brothers have left breakbeat behind for pop radio takeover. It's a well-made hip-hop pastiche designed to further upset the modern-rock-hip-hop-dance club balance, with Q-Tip rapping over a Middle Eastern string hook and tabla beat.
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By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2012
Before America embraced Skrillex, Swedish House Mafia and David Guetta, there was Norman Cook, aka Fatboy Slim, the 48-year-old British DJ and producer who won over fans with quirky music videos (who could forget Christopher Walken prancing around an empty hotel in 2001's "Weapon of Choice"?) and big-beat dance music. More than 15 years after his first album, "Better Living Through Chemistry," Cook still attacks the road like a rookie proving his worth. Last year, he performed at more concerts than ever before.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | June 22, 1999
Last year, music industry pundits assured us that the Next Big Thing would be "electronica" (the catch-all term given techno, trance, drum 'n' bass and other DJ-designed forms of electronic dance music). This was to be the final nail in the coffin of rock and roll, the high-tech trend that would once and for all wean us away from the antediluvian clangor of electric guitar.But a funny thing happened on the way to the future -- rock didn't go away. Indeed, it turned out that the most popular examples of electronica were those that sounded most like rock and roll, particularly "big beat" singles like Fatboy Slim's "The Rockafeller Skank."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case | June 3, 2011
When it came time for Ethan Rosenberg, guitarist of Baltimore funk band the 14th Circuit, to record the group’s latest album, Monkey Juice, he didn’t have to look far for an engineer or mixer. That’s because Rosenberg not only mans the six-string and occassional keyboards, but he also knows his way around a recording studio. Music is the constant in his life, whether he’s writing, performing or mixing a new track. When we met at a downtown coffee shop, he couldn’t help but recommend a new pair of headphones on my way out of the door.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE | July 26, 2007
Chemical Brothers -- We Are the Night (Astralwerks) Electronic big-beat dance-music geeks get old, too, so maybe that's what explains "The Salmon Dance," the novelty number on the Chemical Brothers' sixth album. It sounds like a demo for a drum-programmed children's record. But besides that foray into unabashed goofiness, the Bros are mostly up to their old excellent tricks of bass-drum-powered ravers such as "Saturate," and swooshy head trips such as "The Pills Won't Help You Now," a collaboration with Midlake.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | November 14, 1996
Because trip-hop is not band music, some people think it will never succeed in a concert format. As they see it, how exciting could it be to watch a couple of DJs?Obviously, these folks have never seen the Chemical Brothers. Although this British duo -- Ed Simons and Tom Rowlands -- work with the usual assortment of samples and loops, they approach trip-hop with a rock and roll attitude, emphasizing aggression as much as groove. In fact, the group's current single, "Setting Sun," quotes "Tomorrow Never Knows" and boasts a vocal from Oasis' Noel Gallagher.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | April 17, 1997
The Chemical BrothersDig Your Own Hole (Astralwerks 6180)There's a reason the Chemical Brothers have the music industry abuzz -- nobody makes dance records that rock as hard as theirs do. "Dig Your Own Hole," the duo's second album, may kick off with the sampled announcement that the Chemicals are "back with another one of those block rockin' beats," but it isn't just the rhythm that makes this music jump. Like the Bomb Squad, Public Enemy's old production crew, the Chemicals recognize that texture is the key to controlling musical momentum.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case | June 3, 2011
When it came time for Ethan Rosenberg, guitarist of Baltimore funk band the 14th Circuit, to record the group’s latest album, Monkey Juice, he didn’t have to look far for an engineer or mixer. That’s because Rosenberg not only mans the six-string and occassional keyboards, but he also knows his way around a recording studio. Music is the constant in his life, whether he’s writing, performing or mixing a new track. When we met at a downtown coffee shop, he couldn’t help but recommend a new pair of headphones on my way out of the door.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 25, 1995
THE SHOWThe Soundtrack (Def Jam 314 529 021)What makes rap soundtrack albums so attractive is that they're nothing but singles -- a string of potential hits instead of the usual album array of two or three good tracks and a whole lot of filler. With "The Show" (the movie opens in theaters today), that ,, come-on is intensified by a lineup that looks like a Who's Who of modern hip-hop: Snoop Doggy Dogg, Dr. Dre, 2Pac, the Notorious B.I.G., Mary J. Blige, Method Man, Warren G and A Tribe Called Quest, to name but a few. The album doesn't quite deliver what the marquee promises, since Dr. Dre, Slick Rick and Treach don't actually rap -- their tracks are just soundbites on the state of the music.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2012
Before America embraced Skrillex, Swedish House Mafia and David Guetta, there was Norman Cook, aka Fatboy Slim, the 48-year-old British DJ and producer who won over fans with quirky music videos (who could forget Christopher Walken prancing around an empty hotel in 2001's "Weapon of Choice"?) and big-beat dance music. More than 15 years after his first album, "Better Living Through Chemistry," Cook still attacks the road like a rookie proving his worth. Last year, he performed at more concerts than ever before.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE | July 26, 2007
Chemical Brothers -- We Are the Night (Astralwerks) Electronic big-beat dance-music geeks get old, too, so maybe that's what explains "The Salmon Dance," the novelty number on the Chemical Brothers' sixth album. It sounds like a demo for a drum-programmed children's record. But besides that foray into unabashed goofiness, the Bros are mostly up to their old excellent tricks of bass-drum-powered ravers such as "Saturate," and swooshy head trips such as "The Pills Won't Help You Now," a collaboration with Midlake.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dean Kuipers and Dean Kuipers,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 3, 2005
The Chemical Brothers have crafted an inconsistent coup, an evolution in big beat and sweet dance-pop loyalty as hard-hitting as their mid-'90s works Exit Planet Dust or Dig Your Own Hole. "Galvanize," the first single on Push the Button, makes it plain the brothers have left breakbeat behind for pop radio takeover. It's a well-made hip-hop pastiche designed to further upset the modern-rock-hip-hop-dance club balance, with Q-Tip rapping over a Middle Eastern string hook and tabla beat.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | June 22, 1999
Last year, music industry pundits assured us that the Next Big Thing would be "electronica" (the catch-all term given techno, trance, drum 'n' bass and other DJ-designed forms of electronic dance music). This was to be the final nail in the coffin of rock and roll, the high-tech trend that would once and for all wean us away from the antediluvian clangor of electric guitar.But a funny thing happened on the way to the future -- rock didn't go away. Indeed, it turned out that the most popular examples of electronica were those that sounded most like rock and roll, particularly "big beat" singles like Fatboy Slim's "The Rockafeller Skank."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | April 17, 1997
The Chemical BrothersDig Your Own Hole (Astralwerks 6180)There's a reason the Chemical Brothers have the music industry abuzz -- nobody makes dance records that rock as hard as theirs do. "Dig Your Own Hole," the duo's second album, may kick off with the sampled announcement that the Chemicals are "back with another one of those block rockin' beats," but it isn't just the rhythm that makes this music jump. Like the Bomb Squad, Public Enemy's old production crew, the Chemicals recognize that texture is the key to controlling musical momentum.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | November 14, 1996
Because trip-hop is not band music, some people think it will never succeed in a concert format. As they see it, how exciting could it be to watch a couple of DJs?Obviously, these folks have never seen the Chemical Brothers. Although this British duo -- Ed Simons and Tom Rowlands -- work with the usual assortment of samples and loops, they approach trip-hop with a rock and roll attitude, emphasizing aggression as much as groove. In fact, the group's current single, "Setting Sun," quotes "Tomorrow Never Knows" and boasts a vocal from Oasis' Noel Gallagher.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 25, 1995
THE SHOWThe Soundtrack (Def Jam 314 529 021)What makes rap soundtrack albums so attractive is that they're nothing but singles -- a string of potential hits instead of the usual album array of two or three good tracks and a whole lot of filler. With "The Show" (the movie opens in theaters today), that ,, come-on is intensified by a lineup that looks like a Who's Who of modern hip-hop: Snoop Doggy Dogg, Dr. Dre, 2Pac, the Notorious B.I.G., Mary J. Blige, Method Man, Warren G and A Tribe Called Quest, to name but a few. The album doesn't quite deliver what the marquee promises, since Dr. Dre, Slick Rick and Treach don't actually rap -- their tracks are just soundbites on the state of the music.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | October 14, 2004
The Butchies' album Lesbian punk rock trio the Butchies hit the Royal Saturday in support of their new album, Make Yr Life. The trio describes the album as being "like waking from a coma, or like having your dog lick away your tears, or like the first kiss with that sexy girl with moonlight splashed on her face." The Butchies headline Saturday's show, which also features performances by Misty Letts and Secret Crushed Society. Doors open at 7 p.m., and tickets are $8 in advance and $10 at the door.
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