Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChemical Bank
IN THE NEWS

Chemical Bank

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 11, 1997
An article Sunday about the condemned Riverdale Apartments in Essex-Middle River incorrectly described the status of the property. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has foreclosed on half of the complex; Chemical Bank, now part of Chase Manhattan Bank, holds a mortgage on the other half and has not foreclosed.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 9/11/97
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
At one point during the three years that Harbor Bank of Maryland operated under heightened federal scrutiny, a regulator asked CEO Joseph Haskins Jr. why he stuck it out. Why not just retire? But for Haskins, one of the founders of the Baltimore bank in 1982, walking away was not an option. "I've grown up not running from a challenge, but facing it head on and looking to find a solution," said Haskins, 65. "And so, it isn't in my DNA to wilt under pressure. In fact, it only strengthens my resolve.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 6, 1994
* Alfred Harvey, 80, who brought such cartoon characters as Casper the Friendly Ghost and Richie Rich the Poor Little Rich Boy to newsstands and TV and movie screens, died Monday in Larchmont, N.Y. His company, Harvey World Famous Comics, produced comic books and cartoons featuring such characters as Wendy the Good Little Witch; Spooky the Tuff Little Ghost; Baby Huey; Little Audrey; and Little Dot. It also published "Sad Sack," the military comic strip....
NEWS
September 11, 1997
An article Sunday about the condemned Riverdale Apartments in Essex-Middle River incorrectly described the status of the property. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has foreclosed on half of the complex; Chemical Bank, now part of Chase Manhattan Bank, holds a mortgage on the other half and has not foreclosed.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 9/11/97
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | July 6, 1995
NEW CANAAN, Conn. -- Smith Corona Corp. filed for bankruptcy court protection yesterday and said it could go out of business, as the personal computer has crushed its century-old typewriter business.Company attorney Laura Davis Jones said in a bankruptcy court hearing that a recent drop in revenue caused a cash-flow problem that forced the Chapter 11 filing. The company also said it sought court protection to help line up financing and carry out a plan to cut its work force by 26 percent.
NEWS
August 28, 1991
Eva Bertrand Adams, a gold miner's daughter who presided over the U.S. Mint for eight years, died at age 80 Friday at a hospital in Reno, Nev. Miss Adams was born in Wonder, Nev., a gold-mining town that diedwhen the gold ran out. She received a bachelor's degree from the University of Nevada, a master's degree in English from Columbia University, and a bachelor of laws degree and doctor of laws degree from George Washington University. She became a member of the bar in her home state and in the District of Columbia, as well as of the Supreme Court bar. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy named her director of the Mint.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau of The Sun | November 10, 1990
NEW YORK -- Maryland Cable Corp., the Prince George's County cable television operator, defaulted on its bank loans yesterday after extended negotiations with bankers to secure a waiver on principal repayment of its $92 million bank loan failed.The company has been given 30 days by a bank syndicate led by Citicorp to devise a comprehensive restructuring plan on its debt. In the meantime, service will continue for all subscribers."There will be no impact on our customers or our business," said John Motulsky, senior vice president for MultiVision, the Greenwich, Conn.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin | July 12, 1991
The average interest rate on a U.S. credit card still hovers in the stratosphere at 18.42 percent. But the head of a Maryland company that tracks credit cards says the heat is on the big Visa and MasterCard issuers to lower their interest rates."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | April 2, 1996
TROY, Mich. -- Kmart Corp. said yesterday that it reached agreement with Chemical Bank for a $3.7 billion credit facility that will allow the struggling store chain to clear its largest financial hurdle.The nation's second-largest retailer will use the lines of credit to replace about $3 billion in debt that comes due next year. The package also will give Kmart $700 million more in credit.The agreement is key to Kmart's revival, analysts said, because it bolsters the chain's financial flexibility and liquidity, and allows management to now focus on reviving earnings and stores.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | November 4, 1994
You can bank on it.Banking at home -- rather than the availability of hundreds of movies, interactive games or reference volumes -- could be the first profitable breakthrough on the information superhighway.It all adds up: Americans pay 400 million bills daily because they have no choice. There are more than 30 million home computers in this country and, thus far, only about 300,000 are used toaccomplish basic banking chores.Using technology to complete required tasks should take precedence in the long run over purely discretionary entertainment and information.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | April 2, 1996
TROY, Mich. -- Kmart Corp. said yesterday that it reached agreement with Chemical Bank for a $3.7 billion credit facility that will allow the struggling store chain to clear its largest financial hurdle.The nation's second-largest retailer will use the lines of credit to replace about $3 billion in debt that comes due next year. The package also will give Kmart $700 million more in credit.The agreement is key to Kmart's revival, analysts said, because it bolsters the chain's financial flexibility and liquidity, and allows management to now focus on reviving earnings and stores.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | July 6, 1995
NEW CANAAN, Conn. -- Smith Corona Corp. filed for bankruptcy court protection yesterday and said it could go out of business, as the personal computer has crushed its century-old typewriter business.Company attorney Laura Davis Jones said in a bankruptcy court hearing that a recent drop in revenue caused a cash-flow problem that forced the Chapter 11 filing. The company also said it sought court protection to help line up financing and carry out a plan to cut its work force by 26 percent.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | November 4, 1994
You can bank on it.Banking at home -- rather than the availability of hundreds of movies, interactive games or reference volumes -- could be the first profitable breakthrough on the information superhighway.It all adds up: Americans pay 400 million bills daily because they have no choice. There are more than 30 million home computers in this country and, thus far, only about 300,000 are used toaccomplish basic banking chores.Using technology to complete required tasks should take precedence in the long run over purely discretionary entertainment and information.
NEWS
July 6, 1994
* Alfred Harvey, 80, who brought such cartoon characters as Casper the Friendly Ghost and Richie Rich the Poor Little Rich Boy to newsstands and TV and movie screens, died Monday in Larchmont, N.Y. His company, Harvey World Famous Comics, produced comic books and cartoons featuring such characters as Wendy the Good Little Witch; Spooky the Tuff Little Ghost; Baby Huey; Little Audrey; and Little Dot. It also published "Sad Sack," the military comic strip....
BUSINESS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Staff Writer | January 14, 1993
Two months after winning a $4.6 million judgment against Eli S. Jacobs, a New York bank hopes to collect by going after money owed to the Orioles owner by the team.In papers filed in Baltimore Circuit Court, Manufacturers & Traders Trust Co. says its judgment against Mr. Jacobs, principal owner of the Orioles, remains "unpaid in whole." The debt is from a delinquent loan.The Orioles were notified of the action Tuesday and are required to respond in 30 days.The bank's action comes as Mr. Jacobs is said to be discussing a sale of the team with a group of investors led by Cincinnati businessman William O. DeWitt Jr. Mr. Jacobs, whose business empire has run into trouble, offered the team for sale two years ago, but the names of potential buyers emerged only recently.
BUSINESS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Staff Writer | November 24, 1992
Eli S. Jacobs has dropped his challenge to a lawsuit brought by Mercantile-Safe Deposit & Trust Co. in its attempt to collect a $21.6 million debt from the Orioles owner.In papers filed in Baltimore Circuit Court yesterday, Mr. Jacobs waived his objections to the bank's demand that he repay the delinquent loan.That effectively moves the dispute between Mr. Jacobs and the Baltimore bank out of the courts and into private negotiations. Baltimore Circuit Judge Joseph H.H. Kaplan agreed yesterday to cancel a scheduled deposition of Mr. Jacobs on Dec. 2 by Mercantile lawyers and a Dec. 7 court hearing.
BUSINESS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Staff Writer | November 24, 1992
Eli S. Jacobs has dropped his challenge to a lawsuit brought by Mercantile-Safe Deposit & Trust Co. in its attempt to collect a $21.6 million debt from the Orioles owner.In papers filed in Baltimore Circuit Court yesterday, Mr. Jacobs waived his objections to the bank's demand that he repay the delinquent loan.That effectively moves the dispute between Mr. Jacobs and the Baltimore bank out of the courts and into private negotiations. Baltimore Circuit Judge Joseph H.H. Kaplan agreed yesterday to cancel a scheduled deposition of Mr. Jacobs on Dec. 2 by Mercantile lawyers and a Dec. 7 court hearing.
BUSINESS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Staff Writer | January 14, 1993
Two months after winning a $4.6 million judgment against Eli S. Jacobs, a New York bank hopes to collect by going after money owed to the Orioles owner by the team.In papers filed in Baltimore Circuit Court, Manufacturers & Traders Trust Co. says its judgment against Mr. Jacobs, principal owner of the Orioles, remains "unpaid in whole." The debt is from a delinquent loan.The Orioles were notified of the action Tuesday and are required to respond in 30 days.The bank's action comes as Mr. Jacobs is said to be discussing a sale of the team with a group of investors led by Cincinnati businessman William O. DeWitt Jr. Mr. Jacobs, whose business empire has run into trouble, offered the team for sale two years ago, but the names of potential buyers emerged only recently.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau | April 14, 1992
NEW YORK -- Chemical Banking Corp., parent of the nation's second-largest bank, reduced the rate it charges on loans to top customers yesterday to the lowest level since 1976.The bank's move was not echoed by other major lenders, blunting its potential impact on the economy.Chemical's reduction in its prime rate to 6.25 percent from 6.5 percent comes in the wake of Friday's deliberate and effective effort by the Federal Reserve to drive down the wholesale cost of funds paid by financial institutions.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau | April 14, 1992
NEW YORK -- Chemical Banking Corp., parent of the nation's second-largest bank, reduced the rate it charges on loans to top customers yesterday to the lowest level since 1976.The bank's move was not echoed by other major lenders, blunting its potential impact on the economy.Chemical's reduction in its prime rate to 6.25 percent from 6.5 percent comes in the wake of Friday's deliberate and effective effort by the Federal Reserve to drive down the wholesale cost of funds paid by financial institutions.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.