Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChemical Agents
IN THE NEWS

Chemical Agents

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr | January 18, 1991
Although there was no chemical payload aboard Iraqi missiles that exploded in and around Tel Aviv, Israel, yesterday, Iraq is known to possess such weapons.A spokesman for the Israeli military said that early reports that the missiles carried chemical weapons were unfounded.Iraq has the capability to use both nerve agent, which kills within minutes, and mustard agent, a lethal blistering substance best known from its use in World War I, U.S. Army and chemical weapons experts have said.The type of nerve agent Iraq has stockpiled and reportedly loaded into some missiles is non-persistent nerve agent.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2014
A team of civilian specialists from Aberdeen Proving Ground is headed to the Mediterranean Sea for what is being called a historic mission to destroy Syria's chemical warfare stockpile - an effort that could serve as a model in the drive to rid the world of weapons of mass destruction. The 64 civilians and contractors from the Edgewood Area are at the center of an international mission to neutralize up to 700 tons of chemical agents surrendered by the government of Syrian President Bashar Assad.
Advertisement
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Staff Writer | May 14, 1992
Rep. Tom McMillen proposed yesterday that a congressionally mandated deadline for the destruction of the nation's aging mustard agent -- including that stored at Aberdeen Proving Ground -- be extended from 2000 to at least 2010 by linking it to a pending disposal agreement by the International Convention on Chemical Weapons.His bill would require study of alternative disposal technologies.A controversial incinerator at Aberdeen, where 5 percent of the overall stockpile is stored, is scheduled for construction in 1995.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
In a world of tanks and fighter jets, chemical hazard detection devices aren't exactly high profile. But nothing brings them into the light like a sarin gas attack. Officials at Smiths Detection, which makes detectors locally and overseas that are small enough to take into the field, said they have spotted the firm's units used in Syria as international peacekeepers search for more details about attacks that killed civilians in the war-torn country. "We can't get into, really, specifics of who has our systems or how they're used because of the proprietary nature, but there have been photos that I've seen and others have seen with our LCDs in the hands of U.N. weapons inspectors," said Aaron M. Gagnon, Smiths Detection's director of product management for chemical, biological, trace explosives and radiation protection systems.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 21, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The chairwoman of a federal panel investigating the illnesses of veterans of the 1991 Persian Gulf war said yesterday that she believed that the veterans were clearly experiencing more health problems than other veterans, and that Iraqi chemical weapons and other chemical agents might be to blame for many of their ailments.The chairwoman, Dr. Eula Bingham, a toxicologist who is the former head of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, said it was too early to rule out Iraqi chemical or biological weapons as the cause of many of the illnesses of the veterans, given how little was known about the weapons' long-term health effects.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Staff Writer | October 11, 1992
ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND -- In a victory for critics of the Army's plan to incinerate its old chemical agents here and elsewhere, Congress has told the service it must take a second look at possibly safer and cheaper ways of destroying the lethal material.What to do with the stockpiles at the proving ground in Harford County and at seven other U.S. sites has been an evolving question since the mid-1980s, when Congress first told the Army to dispose of the mustard and nerve agents.It is a highly charged issue here, where residents worry about health and safety, and a global diplomatic issue, as negotiators around the world prepare to sign an accord early next year calling for the destruction of all chemical weapons.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 8, 1996
WASHINGTON -- As evidence mounts that more Persian Gulf war troops might have been exposed to chemical weapons than earlier believed, scientists say there still is little evidence that such exposure could result in some of the long-term illnesses reported by veterans and collectively known as gulf war syndrome.But researchers said that the lack of a link between low-level exposures to chemical agents, such as nerve gases or blistering chemicals, and later chronic illnesses could result from a lack of study.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | November 2, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The federal government is launching a pilot program to determine whether a range of illnesses suffered by thousands of Persian Gulf War veterans may have been triggered by exposure to chemical weapons used by Iraq.The government expects to take the program nationwide once doctors develop a regimen of neurological and other exams to best detect exposure to chemical agents.The testing program was sparked by the Defense Department's acknowledgment last week that Czech troops detected low levels of chemical agents during the 1991 conflict, Veterans Affairs Secretary Jesse Brown said yesterday.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1990
The current crisis in the Middle East and concern over Iraqi chemical weapons has prompted the U.S. Marine Corps to place a mult-million order for chemical detectors made by Environmental Technologies Inc. of Towson.The value of the contract or the number of detectors ordered was not revealed for security reasons, a company spokesman said.The contract calls for immediately delivery of the hand-held instruments, which weigh only a half pound and can detect a wide variety of chemical agents.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | August 9, 1992
The U.S. Army and Greenpeace ended a community meeting Monday by agreeing to disagree on what to do with the military's aging stockpile of mustard agent.To the Army, plans to incinerate mustard agent should proceed until another method of disposal is available, although it could take a decade or more before such technology is developed.But to Greenpeace, any of the possible alternatives would be preferable to incineration, and it may be better to wait for the methods to be developed.Representatives of the Army and Greenpeace met at the session sponsored by the Committee for National Security, a Washington-based educational organization that works to inform the public on arms control and national security issues.
NEWS
By Lenny Siegel | September 25, 2013
Globally, chemical weapons demilitarization has been difficult, slow and costly, but with technologies that have been developed over the past two decades, the safe destruction of Syria's chemical weapons stockpile is feasible. While the diplomats work out the principles for sequestering and eliminating Syrian chemical warfare materiel, our government and others should be developing a strategy for safe, secure demilitarization. That work must begin now, not only because it will take time, but also because it is likely to raise issues that the diplomats will need to resolve.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | January 4, 2006
Joseph Epstein, a research chemist and former chief of defense research at Edgewood Arsenal, died of kidney failure Saturday at Northwest Hospital Center. He was 87. Born and raised in Philadelphia, the son of Polish immigrants, he earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry in 1938 from Temple University in Philadelphia, his master's from the University of Pennsylvania in 1940, and a doctorate in 1966 from the University of Delaware. Dr. Epstein began his civilian career at the Army's Edgewood Arsenal in 1940, and during a 40-year career there became an acknowledged expert in chemical warfare, detoxification, treatment of contaminated water supplies and safe disposal of chemical weapons.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2003
If a "smoking gun" is found to support President Bush's assertion that Iraq possesses weapons of mass destruction - a primary justification for the current war - it might be discovered in a tiny glass tube inside an obscure brick building labeled E-5100, 25 miles north of Baltimore. It is there, at Aberdeen Proving Ground's Forensic Analytical Center, that scientists are studying samples of suspected nerve and blister agents found by soldiers from the Army's 101st Airborne Division this month near Karbala, 50 miles south of Baghdad.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 9, 2003
WASHINGTON - Samples of suspected chemical agents found at an agricultural site in Iraq are being flown to Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland to determine whether they are prohibited nerve and blister agents, defense officials said yesterday. Preliminary tests indicated the presence of chemical agents, according to Col. Tim Madere, the senior chemical warfare officer for the Army's V Corps. But more sophisticated testing is needed to confirm any findings. The tests at Aberdeen take about 72 hours to produce a final result.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2001
In the United States' preparedness battle against chemical and biological warfare, Aberdeen Proving Ground is a formidable weapon - a point U.S. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski drove home yesterday in a tour of the facility's Edgewood area. "Aberdeen has always been ... the center for developing weapons of war to meet needs for today and the future," the Maryland Democrat said, adding that many research findings at Aberdeen are of "dual use" - valuable to the military and civilians. She said she plans to work with President Bush to keep the post on the leading edge of research and development.
NEWS
By David Goldstein and David Goldstein,Knight Ridder/Tribune | October 1, 1999
WASHINGTON -- It is a normally quiet corner of the city, an enclave of wealth and prestige whose winding, leafy lanes are home to foreign ambassadors and other members of the capital's upper crust.It is also home, however, to some ghosts from an antique age, and it's taking more than $25 million and the combined efforts of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the city to exorcise them.Beneath the green lawns and ornamental gardens of the South Korean ambassador's back yard lies a burial pit for World War I-era chemical weapons and munitions.
NEWS
By David Rocks and David Rocks,Contributing Writer | December 2, 1993
PRAGUE, Czech Republic -- U.S. officials said yesterday that they accept a Czech report that traces of chemical warfare agents were found on several occasions during the Persian Gulf war, but said no link has been found so far between the findings and illnesses plaguing veterans of the conflict."
NEWS
March 9, 1994
The United States and Russia are retargeting their nuclear weapons to fall harmlessly into the sea. Ukraine has agreed -- or has it? -- to give up its nuclear armory. The stories are welcome signs that the Cold War is over. But not forgotten.For one thing, there are still nearly 50,000 nuclear warheads in the hands of the United States and the Soviet successor states. It takes time and money to get rid of them. The U.S. Energy Department is trying to dismantle 1,400 a year; over 10 years it should be possible to get the American arsenal down to a target of 3,500 warheads.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | January 9, 1998
As the United Nations struggles with Iraq over chemical and biological weapons, the U.S. Army -- in a little-noticed event -- is poised to demolish one of the most prominent symbols of its chemical warfare history: Building E5625 at Aberdeen Proving Ground.For almost a half-century, in strictly enforced secrecy, scientists at the "Pilot Plant" produced and experimented on an array of lethal compounds.They worked with mustard agent, a carcinogen that blisters the skin, eyes and lungs, and with an LSD-like substance that causes hallucinations and disorientation.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1997
Prompted by concerns from area residents, officials at Aberdeen Proving Ground have postponed the scheduled detonation of hundreds of pounds of munitions -- including some containing chemical agents.Army officials had planned to blow up 14 chemical rounds and 112 nonchemical rounds at the Edgewood area of APG from Tuesday to mid-May, and planned to announce it through an advertising blitz.But after word got out early and prompted an outcry, base officials began organizing a meeting with elected officials to discuss educating residents in nearby communities in Harford, Cecil, Kent and Baltimore counties about the detonation.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.