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By J. Wynn Rousuck | April 17, 1997
As chroniclers of WASP society, A. R. Gurney and the late John Cheever would appear to be soul mates. So it seems fitting that Gurney has written "A Cheever Evening" -- a dramatization of Cheever short stories, which opens tomorrow at Theatre Hopkins."
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By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | December 24, 2006
American Bloomsbury: Louisa May Alcott, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, Nathaniel Hawthorne and Henry David Thoreau: Their Lives, Their Loves, Their Work Susan Cheever Simon & Schuster / 240 pages / $26 At a time when it can often seem this country has lost touch with the cultural and social idealism which once undergirded American democracy, Susan Cheever's enthralling new literary history serves to remind us of a time when unbridled intellectual excitement,...
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | January 10, 1999
"Note Found in a Bottle: My Life as a Drinker," by Susan Cheever. Simon & Schuster. 192 pages. $23.Susan Cheever has written another affecting memoir of autobiographical speculation. This time she focuses on how alcoholism ruled her life for close to 50 years. Her father, short story writer John Cheever, was famously alcoholic and Cheever reveals how the landscape of her early life was colored by drinking. When she was 6, her Cheever grandmother taught her "how to make a perfect dry martini."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Clarinda Harriss and Clarinda Harriss,Special to the Sun | April 4, 2004
I want to be swept up and carried to a glittering peak on giant wings where I resist, go limp, rise transfigured. I want to be bemused and astonished. I want to be enfolded and sweetly rocked. I want to be struck between the eyes. I want to bathe, perchance to drown, in a great whirl of syntax. Reader, you have felt this way. You have craved the sweet knuckle-chop of "Call me Ishmael" and "My dear, I don't give a damn." You have been magicked by Ecclesiastes' or the Preacher's "There is a time ..."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 1, 1997
John Cheever and A. R. Gurney. It's a match made in WASP literary heaven.Gurney's 1994 play "A Cheever Evening," now playing at Theatre Hopkins, adapts 17 Cheever stories for the stage, with occasionally overlapping characters. The snooty people and social milieu the late Cheever chronicled in his short stories and novels are so close to Gurney's typical dramatic fare, you half expect their characters to know each other.Theatre Hopkins, which has done well by playwright Gurney in the past, proves up to the task again with a cast of six nimbly playing more than 60 roles.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | January 28, 1994
Novelist Benjamin Cheever comes to the word processor with a heritage that could cause major writer's block: a lifetime as the son of the late, Pulitzer Prize-winning author John Cheever.As if that were not daunting enough, Mr. Cheever, 45, spent a lot of the past decade contemplating John Cheever's life -- and his relationship to it -- as he edited a collection of his father's personal letters.The Cheever family's decision to publish these letters, as well as John Cheever's journals, was a bold act that some observers called brave and others called exploitative.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2001
Standing atop a flight of rusty stairs, high above the U.S. Coast Guard Yard in Curtis Bay, the Ancient Mariner watches the battered ships come in. He is older than most of the cutters. He's even outlived some. In nearly 40 years in the Coast Guard, he has steered ships through Arctic storms and war zones, white-knuckled nights and nail-biting days. At 61, Capt. William S. Cheever is an old sea dog. But the elements that wear down the ships seem to invigorate Cheever, the commanding officer of the Coast Guard Yard that straddles the border between Baltimore City and Anne Arundel County.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2001
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. - Dale Earnhardt was fixing to win himself another IROC race at Daytona International Speedway, and Eddie Cheever was fixing to win himself a bottle of whiskey from Earnhardt. Neither got what they wanted. Dale Jarrett won the first International Race of Champions race of the season yesterday. Earnhardt went for a ride in the grass thanks to one, two, three hits from Cheever, who was trying to take the lead with three laps to go. And the only thing Cheever got from Earnhardt was his own ride in the grass when Earnhardt intentionally rear-ended him on the cool-down lap. "Before the race, Dale and I were joking about a sign for cheap whiskey that was being pulled overhead by an airplane," Cheever said.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | December 24, 2006
American Bloomsbury: Louisa May Alcott, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, Nathaniel Hawthorne and Henry David Thoreau: Their Lives, Their Loves, Their Work Susan Cheever Simon & Schuster / 240 pages / $26 At a time when it can often seem this country has lost touch with the cultural and social idealism which once undergirded American democracy, Susan Cheever's enthralling new literary history serves to remind us of a time when unbridled intellectual excitement,...
NEWS
By BARBARA SAMSON MILLS Title: "A Very Private Plot" Author: William F. Buckley Jr. Publisher: Morrow Length, price: 269 pages, $20 and BARBARA SAMSON MILLS Title: "A Very Private Plot" Author: William F. Buckley Jr. Publisher: Morrow Length, price: 269 pages, $20,LOS ANGELES TIMES Title: "Adventures of a Young Verbivore" Author: Richard Lederer Publisher: Pocket Books Length, price: 277 pages, $21 | March 20, 1994
Title: "Thirteen Uncollected Stories by John Cheever"Editor: Franklin H. DennisPublisher: Academy Chicago PublishersLength, price: 227 pages, $19.95 This is not the martinis-on-the-veranda, yacht-club-and-family-gatherings Cheever of the collected stories. This is the Cheever who, in real life, was paralyzed by his fear of bridges, the Cheever who would dutifully put on a suit and hat each morning and travel down in the elevator of his New York apartment building to the storage bin in the basement that he used as his "office."
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2002
INDIANAPOLIS - The Memorial Day holiday has become a three-day weekend in the United States and here, where the Indianapolis 500 is part of that celebration, the question is whether tomorrow may turn into a holiday in Brazil. The impressive Brazilian presence at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway includes pole-sitter Bruno Junqueira (Jun-CARE-a) and five other countrymen in the starting lineup for tomorrow's 86th Indianapolis 500. Four of them are among the top six qualifiers. "People in Brazil use any excuse for a party.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2002
INDIANAPOLIS - One day about two months ago, race-car driver Sarah Fisher was out of a job. Yesterday, she was sitting in her garage at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, contemplating her good fortune. She is here, driving a suddenly viable, Infiniti-powered race car that she qualified on the outside of the third row, in ninth place, for the start of Sunday's 85th annual Indianapolis 500. "One week, I was out of a job; the next, I was in a race car, and two weeks after that, I was putting a program together for Indy," Fisher said, her blue eyes dancing.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2001
Standing atop a flight of rusty stairs, high above the U.S. Coast Guard Yard in Curtis Bay, the Ancient Mariner watches the battered ships come in. He is older than most of the cutters. He's even outlived some. In nearly 40 years in the Coast Guard, he has steered ships through Arctic storms and war zones, white-knuckled nights and nail-biting days. At 61, Capt. William S. Cheever is an old sea dog. But the elements that wear down the ships seem to invigorate Cheever, the commanding officer of the Coast Guard Yard that straddles the border between Baltimore City and Anne Arundel County.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2001
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. - Dale Earnhardt was fixing to win himself another IROC race at Daytona International Speedway, and Eddie Cheever was fixing to win himself a bottle of whiskey from Earnhardt. Neither got what they wanted. Dale Jarrett won the first International Race of Champions race of the season yesterday. Earnhardt went for a ride in the grass thanks to one, two, three hits from Cheever, who was trying to take the lead with three laps to go. And the only thing Cheever got from Earnhardt was his own ride in the grass when Earnhardt intentionally rear-ended him on the cool-down lap. "Before the race, Dale and I were joking about a sign for cheap whiskey that was being pulled overhead by an airplane," Cheever said.
SPORTS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 28, 2000
INDIANAPOLIS - Eddie Cheever is too old and his racing portfolio too extensive and too impressive for him to serve as "poster boy" for an Indy Racing League that remains adrift in unfulfilled aspirations. Tony Stewart emerged from Midwest short-oval proving grounds to fulfill that role. But he won an IRL championship and bolted for NASCAR Winston Cup racing. No other young hero has surfaced from the grass-roots upbringing Indianapolis Motor Speedway president Tony George envisioned upon his 1996 IRL launch in conflict with the established CART open-wheel series.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1999
Race car drivers who have to spend two hours or more circling Dover Downs International Speedway's high-banked, one-mile oval seldom wind up telling stories of the heart.But before the MBNA Mid-Atlantic 200 today, at least two Indy Racing League drivers were talking about their hearts, though they were telling two totally different stories.Eddie Cheever, the former Formula One racer who reinvented himself as an Indy car driver in 1990 and won the 1998 Indianapolis 500, talked about his heart rate.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1999
Race car drivers who have to spend two hours or more circling Dover Downs International Speedway's high-banked, one-mile oval seldom wind up telling stories of the heart.But before the MBNA Mid-Atlantic 200 today, at least two Indy Racing League drivers were talking about their hearts, though they were telling two totally different stories.Eddie Cheever, the former Formula One racer who reinvented himself as an Indy car driver in 1990 and won the 1998 Indianapolis 500, talked about his heart rate.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2002
INDIANAPOLIS - One day about two months ago, race-car driver Sarah Fisher was out of a job. Yesterday, she was sitting in her garage at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, contemplating her good fortune. She is here, driving a suddenly viable, Infiniti-powered race car that she qualified on the outside of the third row, in ninth place, for the start of Sunday's 85th annual Indianapolis 500. "One week, I was out of a job; the next, I was in a race car, and two weeks after that, I was putting a program together for Indy," Fisher said, her blue eyes dancing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | January 10, 1999
"Note Found in a Bottle: My Life as a Drinker," by Susan Cheever. Simon & Schuster. 192 pages. $23.Susan Cheever has written another affecting memoir of autobiographical speculation. This time she focuses on how alcoholism ruled her life for close to 50 years. Her father, short story writer John Cheever, was famously alcoholic and Cheever reveals how the landscape of her early life was colored by drinking. When she was 6, her Cheever grandmother taught her "how to make a perfect dry martini."
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 25, 1998
INDIANAPOLIS -- The first time Eddie Cheever came to the Indianapolis 500 and the place they call The Speedway, it terrorized him."I didn't start my career thinking of ovals," said Cheever, a 40-year-old American who grew up in Europe. "I thought I'd win the Formula One race at Monaco."The first time I came here [1990], I didn't understand the speed. I'm still learning ovals. When I first came here, they warned me about the wall, but they'd call it 'the fence.' When I saw it, I said, 'That's not a fence; that's a wall.
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