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By Julie Rothman, Special To The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2011
Tricia Grannell from Timonium was looking for a recipe for the mocha cheesecake she enjoyed some years ago at Maria's 300 restaurant in Little Italy. The restaurant is no longer open and unfortunately I did not have any luck locating the exact recipe. However, I did receive an excellent recipe from Monica Sugarman of Ellicott City. She said that she makes this cheesecake in her food processor, which gives it a smooth and silky texture, and is fast and easy. Sugarman strongly suggests that "you don't cheap on the chocolate" in this recipe.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Julie Rothman and For The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2014
Betty Jackson of La Porte, Ind., was trying to locate a recipe for a cheesecake that she used to purchase at a Chicago bakery but that they no longer carry. When she inquired, she was told the cake was made with cheese, but not cream cheese, and the bakery would not give her any specifics. She said the cake was somewhat taller then a normal cheesecake, perhaps by about 3 inches, and had a lighter texture. Carol Cipriani of South Bend, Ind., sent in her recipe for an Italian-style cheesecake made with ricotta cheese that she thought might be what Jackson was looking for. It has a graham cracker crust like many American-style cheesecakes, but Cipriani's recipe calls for fresh ricotta instead of cream cheese.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2013
Midweek Madness says "Happy Thanksgiving, pilgrims. " (That's '50s/'60s actress Barbara Nichols, in case you were wondering.)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2013
Midweek Madness says "Happy Thanksgiving, pilgrims. " (That's '50s/'60s actress Barbara Nichols, in case you were wondering.)
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 30, 2005
Thelma Novak of Baltimore has been searching for many years to find a recipe for cheesecake like the one her mother considered to be the best. It had somewhat unique ingredients in that it used cottage cheese, cream cheese and sour cream. Rachel Silbert from Ellicott City sent in her cheesecake recipe that she says has never failed her. It makes a traditional-tasting, rich cheesecake with a graham-cracker crust. The addition of the cottage cheese perhaps serves to make the cake somewhat less dense than other versions I have tried.
FEATURES
By GAIL FORMAN | February 23, 1992
Yes, I know that cheesecake is the ultimate rich and sensuous dessert. Yes, I know there's nothing "cheesy" about a good cheesecake. Still, I've never liked it -- not even the Lindy's famous New York cheesecake of my childhood.But for years my husband has been regaling me with tales of his grandmother's cheesecake, the best in the world, according to his taste memory. So I finally decided to see if I could reproduce it from his description.In the process I learned a lot about the genre. Cheesecakes vary from dense to airy, from tart to sweet and from smooth to textured.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 23, 2005
Frances Smith of Fayetteville, N.C., was looking for a recipe for a cheesecake made in a bundt pan. It had a graham-cracker crust and when the cake was turned out of the pan, the crust was on the top. It was sliced like a regular bundt cake. Cheryl Lisi from West Monroe, N.Y., sent in a recipe she found for a cheesecake that is designed to be made in a bundt pan. It is prepared just like a traditional-style cheesecake except that it is made in a bundt pan, not a springform pan. It makes a beautiful and deliciously rich cake with a nice hint of lemon.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | February 28, 2001
Item: Betty Crocker Cheesecake mix What you get: 1 cheesecake, 8 servings Cost: About $3.50 Nutritional content: Original - 400 calories per slice; 12 grams fat; 5 grams saturated fat; 240 milligrams sodium Preparation time: About 40 to 50 minutes, including baking in conventional oven Review: I counted on Betty Crocker to rescue me when I needed a last-minute dessert to take to a friend's potluck dinner. I wasn't disappointed. This plain cheesecake was creamy and sweet and had a crunchy graham-cracker crust.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | August 9, 2000
Item: Philadelphia Snack Bars What you get: Six bars Cost: About $3.29 Preparation time: Unwrap and eat Review: I tried as hard as I could to resist the siren call of these cheesecake bars. Then when I finally gave in, I couldn't find them in stock. The store's dairy manager said all four flavors tend to sell quickly. After trying the White Chocolate Raspberry and Chocolate Chip bars, I can see why. The bars, which also come in classic (plain) and strawberry flavors, aren't quite as fresh as cheesecake made from scratch.
FEATURES
By Charles Britton and Charles Britton,Copley News Service | January 26, 1992
For those gloomy days, when everything seems to be turning into dross, I have this note of encouragement to offer: We are living in the great age of cheesecake.It's a minor consolation, to be sure, but it's the best I can come up with at the moment.The decade of the '80s, notable for so many epochal events, also managed to bring cheesecake to new heights. The fashion for culinary Americana that set in during the mid-'80s brought cheesecake, always a popular standard, to high-profile dining.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special To The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2012
Janet Brunner from St. Augustine, Fla., was looking for a no-bake recipe for lemon Jell-O cheesecake. Mercedes Shideler from Sebastopol, Calif. shared her recipe for lemon cheesecake that she hopes is the one that Brunner is looking for. This likely is the cheesecake many of us grew up with. Unlike the real deal, even a novice cook can make this and expect good results. With this recipe, you get all the delicious lemon cheesecake flavor without all the extra effort. It's light and tangy — and best of all, it is no-bake.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman and Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2010
Emily Senatore from Kodak, Tenn., was looking for a recipe for making a cheesecake similar to the one made by Sara Lee and sold in supermarkets. She says that the light and creamy dessert is no longer to be found in the freezer section of her market and she would like to be able to make it at home. Darla Cole from Brooklyn, in South Baltimore, sent in a recipe for cheesecake that she calls a Sara Lee clone. I remember fondly the cheesecake made by Sara Lee, and I was pleasantly surprised to find that Cole's simple and quick recipe produced something very close in taste and appearance to the original.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | June 9, 2008
OMAHA, Neb. -- For four days, the menu has been propped up in Katie Hoff's hotel room, opened to the picture of a gooey slice of cheesecake smothered in caramel and chocolate. Swiped from a nearby restaurant - perpetrator unknown - it has served as a motivational tool as good as any devised by Vince Lombardi. Hoff made herself this promise: Three best times at the Mutual of Omaha Swimvitational and a slice of that cake was hers. At first glance, the goal might have seemed beyond reach.
NEWS
By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,McClatchy-Tribune | May 14, 2008
By definition, cheesecake is creamy, luscious, rich and decadent. But the Center for Science in the Public Interest put the Cheesecake Factory's 6 Carb Original on its 10 Worst Foods You Should Never Eat list. Calorie-count.com concurs, giving commercially prepared cheesecakes a D+. The culprit is saturated fat, which typically hovers at 30 to 50 grams per serving. An average person who consumes a 2,000-calorie diet with 30 percent calories from fat should consume about 67 grams in an entire day. Two ways to beat a failing grade?
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to the Sun | June 20, 2007
Anna Pitt of Fallston was looking for a recipe for what she thought was called a Smearcase Cheesecake. It was made with cottage cheese and had a thin layer of crust on the bottom. She thinks that the recipe came from a free recipe booklet put out by the Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. some years ago. Carole Wagner of Middle River still had a copy of the cookbook published by BGE called Maryland Classics, which had the recipe that Pitt was looking for in it. (The book calls it smierkase cake; in German, schmierkase means smeared cheese.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | March 23, 2003
What Am I Doing Wrong? My Cheesecake, So I'm Told, Is Very Good. It's Fluffy and Moist, but Only in the Middle., Once I Remove It From the Oven and It Cools Down, It's Always Cracked Across the Top. I Camouflage It Very Well With Topping, but I Need to Know How to Prevent This. I Was Told Steam Gets Into It, but When? There are certain mysteries of life that never get solved. And right up there at the top of the Enduring Question List is: Why does the top of my cheesecake resemble the Grand Canyon?
NEWS
By Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | October 26, 2003
What's the correct way to rehydrate sun-dried tomatoes? Previously, I just soaked them in water and used them in my recipe, but they tasted bitter -- not at all like the sweet, juicy, plump tomatoes I've tasted in restaurant dishes. Thanks for your help. Unless you buy your sun-dried tomatoes packed in oil, they will need to be rehydrated with liquid. A rule of thumb is to cover sun-dried tomatoes with warm water and soak for two hours at room temperature. You can get a feel for how long they should soak by feeling how flexible they are -- the stiffer they are, the longer they should soak.
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