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By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Staff Writer | December 22, 1994
All in all, this is probably not the best of times for the fast-food industry.I say this because of the latest alarming study, which indicates that greasy hamburgers and other fatty foods may diminish intelligence.Apparently it wasn't enough that these foods can make you heavy. Now it seems they could make you stupid, too.In any event, the study, conducted by a dietitian and a psychology professor at the University of Toronto, measured the responses of 40 rats kept on a high-fat diet for six months.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special To The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2011
The Beef Brother's $8.49 cheeseburger special could be another food court snoozer that satisfies your cravings but leaves your taste buds sulking. It's not. It's also not Kobe. It's not a grass-fed, shade cooled, sung-lullabies-at-bedtime wonder burger. If anything, the burger at this stall in the Charles Center Plaza food court is ordinary. So what's the attraction? For one thing, the fries. Fresh cut, natural cut, Boardwalk — whatever you call skins-on, deep-fried, golden brown, slightly under-salted spuds served in a paper cup with a hint of cooking oil — that's the style.
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BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | March 11, 2004
WASHINGTON - The House voted yesterday to ban liability lawsuits that blame fast-food restaurants or other parts of the food industry for anyone's weight gain, obesity or related health condition. The vote was 276-139. The legislation now goes to the Senate, where its chances for passage are considered slim. "We need to get back to the old-fashioned principles of common sense and personal responsibility, and get away from this new culture where everybody plays the victim and blames other people for their problems," said Rep. Ric Keller, the Florida Republican who is chief sponsor of the measure.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2009
Lillian Burr of Baltimore was looking for a recipe for a cheeseburger pie. She was pretty sure it had some kind of a pancake topping but could not remember much else. Janet Morrissey, also of Baltimore, had a recipe for a cheeseburger pie that she found many years ago on a box of Bisquick baking mix. She said that her kids loved it when they were growing up. This is a kid-friendly dish if there ever was one. It's a snap to make and has everything kids and grown-ups are bound to like. When served with a green salad, it makes an ideal weeknight supper for the family.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 11, 2005
When you eat at Cheeseburger in Paradise - or write a review about it - you're bound to get the Jimmy Buffett song stuck in your head. So let's deal with it at the start and all sing together: "I like mine with lettuce and tomato, Heinz 57 and french-fried potatoes." The Pasadena location, which opened in March, is the first Maryland restaurant in the growing chain, but others are expected to follow soon in California, Md., and in Waldorf. The bigwigs behind Cheeseburger in Paradise - a partnership between Buffett's Margaritaville Holdings and Outback Steakhouse - have their work cut out for them trying to convince Cheeseburger patrons they're in paradise, not a shopping center on Ritchie Highway.
NEWS
July 15, 2007
When this Owings Mills dentist wants a cheeseburger in paradise, he just steps out his front door to a garden Jimmy Buffett would love. You can read about Hubert's slice of tropical paradise online tomorrow at baltimoresun.com/gardener.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Richardson and Cameron Barry and David Richardson and Cameron Barry,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 29, 2000
The expensive, late-model foreign cars parked outside McCabe's aren't indigenous to the restaurant's Hampden neighborhood. They're a testament to people's willingness to drive to find a classic neighborhood bar with good food and friendly service. There's almost always a line for a table here. If you don't want to wait, your best bet is to put together a party of at least five and get a reservation. We've eaten at McCabe's frequently over the years, waiting as long as 30 minutes on a weeknight for a table just to have a superior cheeseburger and a pint of DeGroen's Marzen (now discontinued)
FEATURES
June 4, 2004
Tom Ponton doesn't like being called a parrothead, as fans of Jimmy Buffett are known, because it makes him sound like someone who dresses like a cheeseburger - in paradise, get it? - for the singer's concerts. Still, it beats being called a cicadahead, which could happen after the airing of a radio show that he and pal Pat O'Leary put together for Buffett's Internet station, Radio Margaritaville. Click on www.radiomargarita ville.com at 9 a.m. tomorrow when he and O'Leary offer music and comedy about cicadas.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | July 27, 1991
OLDE PHILADELPHIA INN9510 Philadelphia Road, White Marsh. Hours: 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays; 10 a.m. to midnight Fridays and Saturdays and 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sundays. Call 687-5757.Hardly anybody calls this friendly, appetite-satisfying place by its real name. Go there once and it becomes "the OPI," one of those tavern/restaurant establishments that have earned the honored title of neighborhood eatery.Previously located across Philadelphia Road in a quaint old corner house, the restaurant moved a couple of years ago into this corner of a shopping center.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | April 16, 2008
This hurts to admit, but their ballpark food is better than ours. The concession-stand eats I sampled at the new Washington Nationals Park are superior to those I ate at Camden Yards. This represents a shift in culinary climate. Three years ago when I compared the fare at Camden Yards with that served at RFK Stadium, then the home of the Nationals, Camden Yards food was the clear winner. "Things are better in Baltimore," I wrote then. "Isn't that music to our ears? I never claimed to be neutral."
NEWS
By Marcia Cephus | November 9, 2008
Corridor transportation strategies talk Thursday The Corridor Transportation Corp. will present a "Moving Mid-Maryland: Baltimore-Washington Corridor Transportation Summit II" from 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., Thursday at the BWI Marriott, 1743 W. Nursery Road, Linthicum. The summit will focus on strategies for regional cooperation, identifying and offering creative solutions, the potential of funding options and establishing achievable goals. The cost is $115 for a full day, $65 for the morning session (including breakfast)
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | April 16, 2008
This hurts to admit, but their ballpark food is better than ours. The concession-stand eats I sampled at the new Washington Nationals Park are superior to those I ate at Camden Yards. This represents a shift in culinary climate. Three years ago when I compared the fare at Camden Yards with that served at RFK Stadium, then the home of the Nationals, Camden Yards food was the clear winner. "Things are better in Baltimore," I wrote then. "Isn't that music to our ears? I never claimed to be neutral."
NEWS
July 15, 2007
When this Owings Mills dentist wants a cheeseburger in paradise, he just steps out his front door to a garden Jimmy Buffett would love. You can read about Hubert's slice of tropical paradise online tomorrow at baltimoresun.com/gardener.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | November 22, 2006
About a year and a half after opening, the popular Cold Spring Lane eatery Miss Shirley's Cafe has shut its doors. Not to worry. It's opened new doors catty-corner across the street. Eddie Dopkin, who owns the restaurant with son David, says the two found they had a "good problem" with the original location. "At lunch, and all day Saturday and Sunday, the demand exceeded the capacity we could handle," Dopkin says. He says there were often people waiting for tables crowded inside the front door and out onto the parking lot. So when Big Sky Bakery closed across the street, the Dopkins saw the larger space as a perfect new home for Miss Shirley.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 11, 2005
When you eat at Cheeseburger in Paradise - or write a review about it - you're bound to get the Jimmy Buffett song stuck in your head. So let's deal with it at the start and all sing together: "I like mine with lettuce and tomato, Heinz 57 and french-fried potatoes." The Pasadena location, which opened in March, is the first Maryland restaurant in the growing chain, but others are expected to follow soon in California, Md., and in Waldorf. The bigwigs behind Cheeseburger in Paradise - a partnership between Buffett's Margaritaville Holdings and Outback Steakhouse - have their work cut out for them trying to convince Cheeseburger patrons they're in paradise, not a shopping center on Ritchie Highway.
FEATURES
June 4, 2004
Tom Ponton doesn't like being called a parrothead, as fans of Jimmy Buffett are known, because it makes him sound like someone who dresses like a cheeseburger - in paradise, get it? - for the singer's concerts. Still, it beats being called a cicadahead, which could happen after the airing of a radio show that he and pal Pat O'Leary put together for Buffett's Internet station, Radio Margaritaville. Click on www.radiomargarita ville.com at 9 a.m. tomorrow when he and O'Leary offer music and comedy about cicadas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Richardson and Cameron Barry and David Richardson and Cameron Barry,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 21, 2000
It may have an ordinary rowhouse exterior, but inside, Kisling's is a noisy, friendly bar attracting crowds of hungry and thirsty patrons. The place successfully bridges the gap between the old Southeast Baltimore and the new, hipper Canton. At the intersection of Aliceanna, Boston and Chester streets, it's even geographically on the cusp. On our visits, we had the chance to meet some fixed-to-the-bar old-timers as well as a 3-year-old who happily announced what he was having (mussels)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Restaurant Critic | May 22, 1992
Smart. Owners Dion and Maryann Dorizas have kept the Owl Bar almost exactly as it was in its heyday: the mahogany paneling and booths, the stained glass, the magnificent bar that dominates the room. They had the brick walls sandblasted and the ceiling repainted,but other than that,nothing has changed but the cast of characters.And the menu, of course. It seems somehow trendier than I remember it, although I can't say for sure. The old Owl Bar had huge cheeseburgers and crab cakes and such.
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | March 11, 2004
WASHINGTON - The House voted yesterday to ban liability lawsuits that blame fast-food restaurants or other parts of the food industry for anyone's weight gain, obesity or related health condition. The vote was 276-139. The legislation now goes to the Senate, where its chances for passage are considered slim. "We need to get back to the old-fashioned principles of common sense and personal responsibility, and get away from this new culture where everybody plays the victim and blames other people for their problems," said Rep. Ric Keller, the Florida Republican who is chief sponsor of the measure.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 7, 2004
It may have been wintertime, but the temperature the other day topped 60 degrees - just the weather for a hot-dog outing. A few days earlier, I had stumbled on the perfect destination, Power Dogs, on Pier 4 in the Inner Harbor. Power Dogs sits on the first floor of a building adjacent to the old Power Plant, now the home of a bookstore, restaurants and other establishments. Outside, Power Dogs displays what threatens to become the most tourist-photographed object at the harbor, a statue of a smiling hot-dog man, wearing a folded white paper hat. Inside, Power Dogs is covered in chrome, still gleaming four months after the small eatery opened.
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