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Cheese Ball

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By Laura Werlin and Annie Rush and Laura Werlin and Annie Rush,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 3, 2003
As admitted cheese nerds, we know that many of our cheese fascinations seem, well, a bit strange. But we were recently flipping through some vintage cheese books - The Dairy Cook Book (1941), Encyclopedia of Cheese & Cheese Cookery (1966), Better Homes and Gardens Cooking With Cheese (1966) and A Salute to Cheese (1966), among others - and came across a common thread among the recipes: the cheese ball. This got us thinking: Whatever happened to that nut-coated creamy sphere that lent its profile to the otherwise flat spread at our mothers' dinner parties?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
Susan Fisher from South Bend, Ind., was looking for a recipe making a cheese ball like the one she would buy some years ago that was made and sold by a sorority in Mishawaka, Ind., as a fundraiser. She would purchase several of them each year and says, "These cheese balls were absolutely wonderful. … Everywhere I took one, people would ask me for my recipe … but of course I couldn't give it to them. " The sorority stopped selling them years ago and she has been searching, with no luck, for the recipe ever since.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
Susan Fisher from South Bend, Ind., was looking for a recipe making a cheese ball like the one she would buy some years ago that was made and sold by a sorority in Mishawaka, Ind., as a fundraiser. She would purchase several of them each year and says, "These cheese balls were absolutely wonderful. … Everywhere I took one, people would ask me for my recipe … but of course I couldn't give it to them. " The sorority stopped selling them years ago and she has been searching, with no luck, for the recipe ever since.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2012
Dianne Bernsten from Baltimore was looking for a recipe for making pub cheese similar to one she remembers from the Hilltop Inn and Lounge in Bowie many years ago. She said she has tried several store-bought versions over the years and has not liked any. The Web is full of pub cheese recipes, the majority of which start with processed cheese like Velveeta as a base, but a recipe for a homemade Irish cheddar and ale pub spread that I came...
FEATURES
By Renee Enna and Renee Enna,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 17, 2007
Eric Larson, owner of Marion Street Cheese Market outside Chicago, has fond memories of the cheese ball when his folks entertained. But he also knows that it has been shunned for many reasons -- not least of which is that many cheese balls of yore tasted as bad as they looked. It doesn't have to be that way. "Cheese purists think you shouldn't manipulate cheese like that," Larson said. "Other people think of it as not an exciting way to entertain." But Larson wants to bring the cheese ball back into everyone's good graces.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2012
Dianne Bernsten from Baltimore was looking for a recipe for making pub cheese similar to one she remembers from the Hilltop Inn and Lounge in Bowie many years ago. She said she has tried several store-bought versions over the years and has not liked any. The Web is full of pub cheese recipes, the majority of which start with processed cheese like Velveeta as a base, but a recipe for a homemade Irish cheddar and ale pub spread that I came...
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | December 12, 1990
Cheeseballs make great holiday gifts and hostess presents. They require few ingredients, most of which are in your cupboard, and they can be prepared very quickly.Serve with crackers and/or fresh vegetables. Makes 3 cups.-- Better Homes and Gardens MagazineSilky Roquefort Spread6 ounces blue cheese1 (3-ounce) package cream cheese1/4 pound (1 stick) butter or margarineDash of Worcestershire saucePlace both kinds of cheese and butter in the bowl of an electric mixer and allow to come to room temperature.
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 11, 2006
Gerry Smaidris of Woodstock, Ill., was looking for a recipe for a carrot casserole made with sliced carrots, yellow onion, cheddar cheese and cream of celery soup. She had lost all her recipes in a fire and is trying to replace her favorites. Regina Evans of Knoxville, Tenn., sent in a nice recipe for a carrot casserole that she found in the Taste of Home Casserole Cookbook. The recipe by Lois Hagen of Stevens Point, Wis., is a winner and she says that "each time I make this dish, people rave about how good it is."
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | November 29, 1990
Director Rob Reiner, reported to have said that ''Misery'' wasn't his kind of film, admits he was accurately quoted.''But I wasn't attracted to the story because of its violence,'' he said. ''I'm not interested in making violent films.''The movie is 106 minutes long, and there is very little horror. We intentionally tried to de-gore it. That's not my thrust. I was more interested in the fact that this is also a story about an author who has had great success with a certain genre, hopes to leave it and wonders if he will lose his audience if he does.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Columnist | November 14, 2006
Just in time for the holidays, comedian Amy Sedaris has published an entertaining guide that will have people talking about your parties well into the new year. But probably not in a good way. I Like You: Hospitality Under the Influence (Warner Books, $27.99) is a cheese-ball collection of recipes, party tips, decorating and gift suggestions. And Sedaris loves cheese balls. They are the centerpiece of all her parties -- she puts an extra one in the bedroom to "de-clump" the guests -- and her favorite time-saving tip is to re-form the cheese balls at the end of the night and use them again at your next party!
FEATURES
By Renee Enna and Renee Enna,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 17, 2007
Eric Larson, owner of Marion Street Cheese Market outside Chicago, has fond memories of the cheese ball when his folks entertained. But he also knows that it has been shunned for many reasons -- not least of which is that many cheese balls of yore tasted as bad as they looked. It doesn't have to be that way. "Cheese purists think you shouldn't manipulate cheese like that," Larson said. "Other people think of it as not an exciting way to entertain." But Larson wants to bring the cheese ball back into everyone's good graces.
NEWS
By Laura Werlin and Annie Rush and Laura Werlin and Annie Rush,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 3, 2003
As admitted cheese nerds, we know that many of our cheese fascinations seem, well, a bit strange. But we were recently flipping through some vintage cheese books - The Dairy Cook Book (1941), Encyclopedia of Cheese & Cheese Cookery (1966), Better Homes and Gardens Cooking With Cheese (1966) and A Salute to Cheese (1966), among others - and came across a common thread among the recipes: the cheese ball. This got us thinking: Whatever happened to that nut-coated creamy sphere that lent its profile to the otherwise flat spread at our mothers' dinner parties?
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and By Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | August 25, 2002
In pointing out that their gift shop offers a wide array of merchandise, the folks who run the Spam Museum in Minnesota say "Spam is more than just something to eat!" The remark seems culturally unplugged to a breathtaking degree. After it is a tired national joke, a cultural signifier, a Monty Python schtick, an amusing sculptural medium, an emblem of food awfulness and more recently a noun and a verb associated with junk e-mail -- after all this, Spam is actually something to eat. Hormel Foods sponsors annual competitions around the country in which people concoct recipes and win prizes, all to drum up press for their product and emphasize a point that might get lost in the shuffle.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Staff Writer | July 5, 1992
To win in the NBA, a team has to have the horses.Nobody understands that better than Washington Bullets general manager John Nash, who is trying to piece together an NBA contender after years of mediocrity at the Capital Centre.And Nash is a man who knows his horses -- literally.For 20 years, the basketball executive has owned thoroughbreds that have competed on the Philadelphia-New Jersey circuits, basically in lower- to mid-level claiming races.He even had a small interest with Robert Levy, chairman of Atlantic City Race Course, in Bet Twice, a Belmont Stakes and Pimlico Special winner who was also second in the 1987 Kentucky Derby and Preakness.
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