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BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 11, 1990
BEIJING -- Price and prejudice might combine to keep the average Chinese away from the Pizza Hut that opened in Beijing yesterday.Pizza means cheese, and cheese wrinkles Chinese noses.The Chinese have a marked aversion to dairy products in general and to cheese in particular. To a sensitive Chinese nostril, cheese packs a powerful and unpleasant reek of spoiled milk."To us, cheese smells rotten," said one young woman when told the ingredients of pizza.@
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FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard | October 2, 2014
At Lib's Grill in Perry Hall, Chef Daniel Chaustit welcomes the summer months with bright colors and the fresh flavors of seasonal fruits. This salad celebrates a variety of flavors and textures, combining crunchy fennel, meaty pistachios, tangy goat cheese, sweet strawberries and earthy beets. On the plate, the riot of color “screams summer,” says Lib's Grill manager Nick Liberatore. Great flavors, fun colors and wild textures? That's definitely something to shout about. Roasted Beets and Goat Cheese with Pomegranate Molasses & Fennel Salt Serves 4 2 pounds assorted beets 2 tablespoons neutral oil, such as vegetable oil Salt to taste ¼ cup toasted pistachios 1 tablespoon roasted fennel seeds ¼ cup strawberries, hulled 1 cup baby arugula 1 bulb baby fennel ¼ cup sherry vinegar ¿ cup kosher salt ¼ cup goat cheese Pomegranate molasses (available at most Middle Eastern or Asian markets)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2011
Baltimore's newest food truck is debuting today. It's a gourmet food truck named GrrChe. The basic menu includes "plain and simple" sandwiches on white or wheat. Specialty sandwiches include the Lobster Grill and the Crab Delight. GrrChe also will be selling gourmet breakfast sandwiches and desserts. The truck's website is here . The Facebook page is here . The Twitter page is here .  
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Thomas and For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
For tailgating purposes, avocados are mostly used for chip-dipping guacamole. However, it is easy to change things up and offer an amazing appetizer that most tailgate aficionados haven't even considered. When avocados are grilled, the inside turns soft and molten, with a hint of nutty flavor. It can be easily scooped with a spoon and enjoyed with a variety of toppings. This is a fantastic game-day appetizer. Grilled avocados with pulled pork Ingredients 6-8 fresh ripe avocados 2 cups prepared pulled pork 2 cups shredded cheese salsa The morning of the tailgate, cut the avocados in half, and remove the pits.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | December 10, 2005
Around this time of year, I start getting phone calls and e-mails asking for holiday entertaining advice. A cousin in North Carolina who is planning a large open house put in one such plea. A few days later a friend in Ohio solicited ideas for something special. At the finish of my holiday cooking classes, students line up for recipe counseling. This flurry of questions isn't surprising, because in the weeks between Thanksgiving and New Year's Eve we open our homes more often than during any other period of the year.
NEWS
By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,Newsday | October 10, 2007
How can I learn more about cheese? The best way to learn about cheese is from someone who knows. Seek out the "big cheese" at your local cheese counter. The rise of artisanal-cheese sales has been accompanied by an increase in cheese-related books. One good place to start is Cheese Essentials by Laura Werlin. Werlin's first book, The New American Cheese, is one of the best guides to the renaissance in American cheese-making. Now she addresses the cheese novice with clear instructions on how to navigate the cheese counter and how to read cheese labels, and explains the eight main styles of cheese and how best to eat and cook with various cheeses (including which melt best)
FEATURES
By Maria Hiaasen | October 15, 1997
* Item: Farm Rich Italian Four Cheese Sticks* Servings: About 5* Cost: $2.39* Preparation time: 6 minutes in conventional oven* Review: Two new frozen cheese snacks caught my kids' eyes recently -- Farm Rich's four-cheese sticks and OreIda Hot Bites stuffed jalapeno peppers. Sorry, OreIda. Farm Rich's four-cheese sticks won the taste test hands down. They're tangier than regular fried mozzarella sticks and much less stringy. OreIda's Hot Bites, on the other hand, didn't match the restaurant version of a fried jalapeno appetizer.
FEATURES
By Philip Lempert and Philip Lempert,Knight-Ridder Tribune | July 3, 1996
In today's low-fat times, cheese has been cast in the role of high-fat, artery-clogging villain. In response to that, manufacturers are refashioning cheese by lowering its fat content. Their success may be seen by the fact that cheese was the only refrigerated dairy product category to show increased sales in 1995.A study conducted by A. C. Nielsen for the International Dairy Foods Association found that cheese gained 2.7 percent in sales for the year ended Sept. 9, 1995, with $4.6 billion in sales.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | March 14, 1999
Editor's note: Wallace P. Flynn loves smelly cheese so much that his family leaves him, his pets can't stand to be around him and even the skunks have to move.There was an old man named Wallace P. FlynnWho lived in a house in the trees --You could smell him for several miles downwindBecause of his fondness for cheese.For the cheese that was dear to W.P.Was not the mild kind, such as Brie,The cheese of polite society --No, he liked cheese that was in your face!That smelled like socks from a marathon race,Cheese that really stank up the place!
FEATURES
By Pat Dailey and Pat Dailey,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 1, 1995
Move over mozzarella.Although this perennially popular pizza topper most assuredly will never be replaced as the best-selling Italian cheese, American markets have more types than ever to tempt shoppers away from it.From seductively creamy fresh cheeses to the sharp piquancy of an aged Parmigiano-Reggiano, here's a rundown on some of the treasures available in the United States:Asiago: Produced in the foothills of the Dolomites, originally from sheep's milk,...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
Susan Fisher from South Bend, Ind., was looking for a recipe making a cheese ball like the one she would buy some years ago that was made and sold by a sorority in Mishawaka, Ind., as a fundraiser. She would purchase several of them each year and says, "These cheese balls were absolutely wonderful. … Everywhere I took one, people would ask me for my recipe … but of course I couldn't give it to them. " The sorority stopped selling them years ago and she has been searching, with no luck, for the recipe ever since.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2014
Amy Dickman from Owings Mills was hoping someone would have the recipe for the garlic herb cheese that was served with the breadsticks at Harvey's restaurant, which used to be located at Green Spring Station in Baltimore County. The restaurant and its adjacent gourmet shop closed some years ago, and since then she has attempted to re-create the spread time and time again, but it never tasted exactly right. Barbra Rosenberg from Baltimore also was a big fan of the Harvey's cheese spread, and when the restaurant closed she launched her own search for a recipe.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Conrad, aconrad@tribune.com | February 24, 2014
Would you care for some Crazy Cheese? Why yes, yes I would. But I would also be OK with some Kraft Easy Cheese. Or some Wis Pride Port Wine spreadable cheese... On Sunday night's episode of "The Walking Dead" on AMC, Michonne tempts Carl with a can of aerosol spray cheese, referring to it as Crazy Cheese. Carl was all upset about the loss of younger sister Judith, and Michonne was trying to lighten his mood by spraying processed cheese product all in her mouth and groaning like a zombie.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | February 19, 2014
Maryland health officials are warning consumers not to eat any cheese products made by Roos Foods because they are “presumptively positive” for Listeria, a bacteria that can cause serious infection. Roos brands include Santa Rosa de Lima, Amigo, Mexicana, Suyapa, La Chapina and La Purisima Crema Nica. Officials at the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene continue testing the products to confirm the presence of Listeria in the cheese made by the Kenton, Del. Company, which did not respond to request for comment..
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 13, 2014
While you're hunkered down during the snowstorm, your body may cry out for comfort foods, such as macaroni and cheese, chips and hot chocolate. But there are ways to avoid temptation and eat healthily while stuck inside during the snowstorm, said Mary Beth Sodus, a registered dietician with the Center for Weight Management and Wellness at the University of Maryland Medical Center. Here are her health hibernation habits: 1. Practice mindful eating and ask yourself: "What am I really hungry for?"
NEWS
Susan Reimer | January 13, 2014
Can you believe it? Just when we need it most, there may be a shortage of Velveeta. The marigold-colored cheese product that melts so smoothly may be missing from your grocer's shelves - it doesn't require refrigeration - just as the NFL playoffs and Super Bowl loom. Football fans are facing a dip crisis. An enterprising reporter for Advertising Age magazine discovered the possibility of a Velveeta shortage when customers noticed there wasn't any to be had in a couple of East Coast grocery stores.
NEWS
By Robin Mather Jenkins and Robin Mather Jenkins,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 27, 2007
The first time I encountered the savory pleasures of chicken breast, ham and cheese was at my high school's honor society dinner in 1972: Chicken Cordon Bleu. It seemed so exotic: chicken pounded thin, stuffed with ham and Swiss cheese, then breaded and deep-fried. Then again, I was only 17. These days, I still like the combination of lean chicken breast, salty ham and creamy cheese. But I'm just as likely to use prosciutto and the creamy Italian cheese Taleggio, as this recipe does, and I wouldn't even dream of breading and deep-frying.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff Writer | January 18, 1995
The flavors of rum and Parmesan cheese invade these two recipes, one from Baltimore and the other from Quebec. They are miles apart in origin and flavor, but totally even in good taste.Lee Connelly of Baltimore wanted a recipe for those "wonderful rum buns once served in the Chestnut Room of the Hecht Co. at Charles and Fayette streets. That was many years ago but good food is haunting," she wrote.Her answer came from Marilyn Liebegott of Baltimore who was not sure her recipe was that of the Hecht Company kitchen.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
Smoke 'em if you got 'em. That might as well be the motto of the team at Annapolis Smokehouse & Tavern, the year-old restaurant where the smoke master tinkers with everything from fruit to duck. Opened in the Bay Ridge Shopping Center in December 2012, Annapolis Smokehouse is a fun place to hang out - the staff is friendly, and during our visit the bar was crowded from the time we got there until we left, when a band was busy setting up for the evening. But the real reason to visit is the smoky, interesting food.
SPORTS
By John Thomas, For The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
There are a couple of ways to make a juicy fail-proof burger for a tailgate. The easiest and most consistent way to do it is to stuff the burger with cheese. A stuffed burger is juicy by nature because the inside is oozing gooey cheese rather than dense beef. This gives you more flexibility at the tailgate because you can keep the burgers warm on the grill longer without worrying about drying them out. The addition of bacon and jalapenos to the cheddar cheese center of this burger provides a unique texture along with a spicy kick that will change the way you view a typical burger.
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