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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2012
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NEWS
August 1, 2014
A recent article raised a number of questions about medical marijuana in Maryland and the risk its use poses to public trust in the medical community ("Medical pot rules raise concern," July 26). As health care providers for this city's children, adolescents and young adults, we witness the harmful effects of chronic marijuana use on health and development in our practice every day. We are thus skeptical of Del. Dan K. Morhaim's assertion that the requirement for continuing medical education for physicians prescribing medical marijuana in Maryland is too burdensome.
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BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | May 21, 1992
Every May, when I was little, Mother would go through an annual ritual in our Pikesville home called "spring cleaning."Grim-faced and determined, she compulsively emptied and dusted the kitchen closets, scrubbed the dishes, took down the heavy winter drapes, "slip-covered" the couch and chairs for summer, beat the dirt from the carpets and hung out all of my heavy wool suits and coats to air. ("Son, have you bathed recently?")Recalling that ancient rite of spring, Ticker presents, 65 years later, a 1992 spring checkup -- this one for your money:(1)
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
The Chesapeake Bay's health improved last year, University of Maryland scientists reported Wednesday, and the leader of the troubled estuary's annual checkup said he sees signs the cleanup effort is making progress. The bay's overall health earned a 'C' grade for 2012, up from a D-plus the year before, according to the analysis by UM's Center for Environmental Science. Most indicators of bay water quality and biological vitality increased, said William Dennison, the center's vice president for science applications.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | January 12, 1996
PALO ALTO, Calif. -- We have been in California little more than a week and already I have a new identity. Or at least a new identity card and enough new passwords, codes, phone numbers, e-mail and other addresses to feed a multiple-personality disorder.Landing on the Stanford campus as a visiting professor, I have begun to feel like one of those birds that gets tagged so it can be tracked as it migrates from one habitat to another.We have migrated here out of the snow for what is amusingly called the winter term.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN REPORTER | May 4, 2008
Turn the tables on your doctors: Do a checkup on them before they conduct one on you. Armed with an Internet connection, you can make sure the medical professionals you're seeing - or considering - are licensed, find out if they have board certification in their specialties, see quality ratings for the hospitals where they practice, get feedback from their patients and weigh in with your own opinions. It's the wired-age version of asking everyone you know for recommendations. "There's an ever-growing appetite for this information," said Scott Shapiro, a spokesman for HealthGrades (healthgrades.
FEATURES
By James Dulley and James Dulley,Contributing Writer | June 5, 1993
Q: My central air conditioner is getting older, but I can't afford a new one. What simple maintenance and improvements can I make to cut my electric bills?A: A simple do-it-yourself maintenance checkup can keep your electric bills as low as possible and avoid unnecessary repair calls. You can also make some simple improvements to your air conditioner to make it more efficient and improve the summertime comfort in your home. First, shut off the electricity to the air conditioner at the circuit breaker or fuse box. Go outdoors and remove the sheet-metal housing.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Evening Sun Staff | November 12, 1990
A Baltimore HMO is paying some of its patients to take care of themselves.As part of a new prenatal health program, the Johns Hopkins Health Plan is giving $10 vouchers to expectant mothers, covered under the state's medical assistance plan, for having regular checkups and attending health-education classes.The voucher system, which will be extended to pregnant women who also attend smoking cessation or drug-detoxification programs, is the "incentive" part of Better Beginnings, a prenatal health and education program started by the health maintenance organization Nov. 1.Better Beginnings is open to all HMO members enrolled at the plan's four city offices, but only medical assistance patients are "being offered that incentive to attend their appointments," says Karen Brodsky, program coordinator.
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER | July 19, 2007
Clay Buchholz must be getting lonely. As we entered the 2007 season, the minor leagues seemed sure to be dominated by a passel of young pitchers who popped scouts' eyes with their stuff and warmed analysts' hearts with their strikeout-to-walk ratios. Phil Hughes, Homer Bailey, Tim Lincecum, Yovani Gallardo. We were supposed to look forward to them all summer, growing a little more excited with each gem tossed at Triple-A. Well, this year, they gave us dessert the minute we walked in the door.
BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY and ANDREW LECKEY,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | June 18, 2006
Higher interest rates and gasoline prices are infecting the family finances of millions of Americans in 2006. Not all at once, but a few dollars here and there gradually add up. Interest-rate, inflation, financial-market and pension worries make a midyear checkup more important than usual this year. Even if you made New Year's resolutions for your money, the scenario has since changed and your family situation may have too. Unfortunately, many Americans don't know where their money goes each month, which is a hazardous situation now that we're entering a period in which inflation could rise further.
EXPLORE
By Gwendolyn Glenn | October 26, 2012
Linda Teixeira, of Laurel, is no stranger to emergency rooms. Her daughter is on dialysis and has other related health issues that require emergency care on a regular basis. What is new for Teixeira is that on this particular evening, she's waiting for her daughter in Laurel Regional Hospital's waiting room. "We live up the street and could walk here, but she was here a couple of times in the past and the service wasn't good, so we had been going to Howard General," Teixeira said.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2012
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NEWS
September 30, 2011
Whether one supports or opposes President Barack Obama's health care reform law, the administration's choice not to prolong the appeals in the legal challenges to the act and to move the matter to the Supreme Court for review in the upcoming term should be welcome news. Much is at stake in the debate, and advocates and foes alike have now had an adequate opportunity to generate their arguments. Naturally, last week's decision generated endless speculation inside the Capitol Beltway about the political implications of a possible Supreme Court ruling next June in the midst of a presidential election campaign.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2011
Going back to school, particularly if it's a new school, can be a daunting time for kids and their parents. There's a lot to consider, from sleep schedules to proper nutrition and immunizations. Much can be accomplished by establishing good habits, says Dr. Julie Yeh, a pediatrician at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, who answered questions about handling the coming school year. How do I get my child off a summer sleep schedule and back to a school schedule? How much sleep does a child need for school, and does it vary by age?
LIFESTYLE
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2011
It's Men's Health Week, and public health officials are encouraging men to pay more attention to their bodies. Not only should they be paying more attention to little changes that don't seem right, they should be getting annual checkups. Diseases common in older men such as prostate cancer can be treated when found early, and other conditions can be prevented from getting worse, says Mercy Medical Center urologist Dr. Ira Hantman. How often do men need to get a general checkup, and what do doctors look for?
NEWS
By Paul West | paul.west@baltsun.com | December 14, 2009
A Baltimore medical researcher has earned the dubious distinction of landing on a national hit list of questionable stimulus projects. But criticism of her work by a pair of Republican senators might have missed the mark. "Stimulus Checkup," a watchdog report prepared by Sen. Tom Coburn of Oklahoma and released in conjunction with Sen. John McCain of Arizona, gives a misleading explanation of a research project involving the highly addictive drug methamphetamine. Coburn and McCain, the Senate's leading critics of wasteful pork-barrel spending, accuse the federal government of awarding University of Maryland researchers "nearly $30,000 to determine whether methamphetamine gives female rats an overpowering desire to have sex."
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | May 24, 2009
Tim Myers, an 18-year-old discus thrower participating in the state track meet at Morgan State University on Saturday, took a break from the heat and dashed into the university student center, where a team of doctors from Johns Hopkins Hospital had set up a makeshift heart checkup program. The Elkton teen slipped off his red mesh jersey and lay down on his side as Ken Cresswell, a cardiac stenographer, placed electrodes on his chest. A mix of blues, greens, oranges and yellows pulsated as an ultrasound showed blood pumping through the aortic valve of his heart.
FEATURES
By James Dulley and James Dulley,Contributing Writer | October 17, 1992
Q: I want to keep my old gas furnace running as efficiently as possible and not buy a new one. What simple things can I do to get it ready for winter and keep it running well?A: It is always a good idea to do some minor maintenance eacfall. By spending an hour or two, you should be able to cut at least $100 off your annual utility bills. A gas (natural or bottled) furnace should be inspected by a qualified service technician every two years.Your fall checkup should include a change of the furnace filter.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West , Paul.west@baltsun.com | December 14, 2009
Washington - -A Baltimore medical researcher has earned the dubious distinction of landing on a national hit list of questionable stimulus projects. But criticism of her work by a pair of Republican senators might have missed the mark. "Stimulus Checkup," a watchdog report prepared by Sen. Tom Coburn of Oklahoma and released in conjunction with Sen. John McCain of Arizona, gives a misleading explanation of a research project involving the highly addictive drug methamphetamine. Coburn and McCain, the Senate's leading critics of wasteful pork-barrel spending, accuse the federal government of awarding University of Maryland researchers "nearly $30,000 to determine whether methamphetamine gives female rats an overpowering desire to have sex."
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | May 24, 2009
Tim Myers, an 18-year-old discus thrower participating in the state track meet at Morgan State University on Saturday, took a break from the heat and dashed into the university student center, where a team of doctors from Johns Hopkins Hospital had set up a makeshift heart checkup program. The Elkton teen slipped off his red mesh jersey and lay down on his side as Ken Cresswell, a cardiac stenographer, placed electrodes on his chest. A mix of blues, greens, oranges and yellows pulsated as an ultrasound showed blood pumping through the aortic valve of his heart.
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