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NEWS
May 11, 2004
NEARLY 10 years ago, Russia decided to launch a pre-emptive war. An offending government was ousted, even as objectives became blurred - and even as the fighting dragged on. The war was declared to be over (several times), and was eventually portrayed as one against "terrorism." And there is, indeed, no denying that Islamic extremists of a violent and opportunistic bent have been attracted to the fight against an imperialistic, occupying power. This was in Chechnya, of course, where on Sunday the Kremlin's hand-picked leader, Akhmad Kadyrov, was blown up by an artillery shell planted under a reviewing stand.
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NEWS
March 3, 2014
I can not agree with the recent letters to The Sun written about the unrest in Ukraine. Although the U.S. has current economic problems, our nation has always shown the resiliency to overcome them in the long run, fueled by a democratic, capitalistic and innovative society ( "Ukraine not unlike the U.S.," Feb. 27). This, unfortunately, is not characteristic of the Ukraine, formerly part of the communist Soviet Union. As for the writer who insists that Russia has every right to claim interference with its sphere of influence ( "The U.S. should speak softly on Ukraine," Feb. 27)
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NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | January 5, 1995
Paris -- The attack on Chechnya has been an attempt by Boris Yeltsin's government to solve one crisis by creating another. It has been an attempt to distract Russians from the country's dramatic political and economic situation by giving them a successful war of colonial reconquest in the Caucasus. This has gone wrong, and the result may be very bad.The gamble deserves to have gone wrong since it was not only cruel but stupid. There was no real justification for this attack -- for all this killing and destruction, and for the precedents that now have been set for Moscow's dealings with the non-Russian peoples once part of the Czarist and Soviet empires.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | October 19, 2008
Russian soldiers killed by rebels near Chechnya ROSTOV-ON-DON, Russia : At least two Russian soldiers were killed and 10 others were wounded yesterday when rebels ambushed a military convoy in a volatile Russian province near Chechnya, officials said. The Russian Interior Ministry in the southern province of Ingushetia said about a dozen militants ambushed a military convoy on a forest road in the Sunzha region yesterday. It said in a statement that the attackers fired automatic weapons and grenades at military trucks, killing two soldiers and wounding others.
NEWS
By Gregory Freidin | December 22, 1994
A SUBTLE but significant change of government has occurred in Russia. The dispatch of Russian soldiers and security forces into Chechnya, the breakaway republic, and the protest it has caused among supporters of reform and "democrats," has realigned the political forces in Russia, more so than did the disbanding of the Parliament in October 1993. Authoritarian rule may be gaining momentum.However distasteful many democrats might have found President Boris N. Yeltsin's decision to shell the Parliament building more than a year ago, they by and large closed ranks behind him. Indeed, the confrontation between Mr. Yeltsin and the retrograde Parliament was the basis for a renewal of the alliance between him and the Western-oriented intellectuals who entered Russia's political fray in the days of "perestroika."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 21, 2003
MOSCOW - A truck exploded yesterday near a government complex in Chechnya in what officials said was the fourth suicide bombing in or near the republic in five weeks. At least two people, believed to be suicide bombers, died, and several more were wounded, the officials said. The attack occurred in the afternoon in the Staropromyslovksy district of Chechnya's capital, Grozny, not far from a police headquarters and a regional office of Russia's Interior Ministry. The force of the blast gouged a deep crater in the road and badly damaged several buildings, but initial accounts - as well as the toll of dead and injured - were wildly contradictory.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | December 19, 1994
MOSCOW -- Fighting intensified throughout the day yesterday in Chechnya, but the Russian aim still seems to be to place maximum psychological pressure on the breakaway republic rather than trying to overrun it in a full-scale assault.As heavy skirmishing was taking place on the outskirts of Grozny, the Chechen capital, President Boris N. Yeltsin's chief of staff warned last night that Chechen President Dzhokhar Dudayev had only "several hours" in which to order his men to lay down their arms.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | February 17, 1995
MOSCOW -- Boris N. Yeltsin, so unsteady a week ago that his aides were forced to guide him by the elbows, delivered a firm and clearly spoken address to the Russian parliament yesterday, defending his policy on Chechnya but acknowledging that much of its execution has gone seriously wrong.The Russian president has been little seen since he ordered 40,000 troops into the breakaway republic 10 weeks ago, fueling speculation that his health was deteriorating badly just as the country was descending into a bloody and potentially disastrous conflict.
NEWS
May 4, 2000
This article first appeared in the Economist: MOSCOW -- If this is victory, what would a stalemate look like? Even in winter, when the Chechen fighters were at their most vulnerable -- cold, hungry and visible through the bare trees -- the Russian forces, which outnumber them at least tenfold, failed to destroy them. Now spring is making conditions in the mountains friendlier for the Chechens. The war goes on. On April 27, Russia reported 10 dead from a Chechen ambush; another one the day before killed 15. The fighting is in areas which Russia claims to have controlled for weeks.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 23, 1995
DUBA-YURT, Russia -- As Russian fighter jets swooped over his village in Chechnya, 69-year-old Magomed Elbuzdukayev shook a fist in anger -- not at the bombers but at the young man running with a rifle toward the neighborhood under fire."
FEATURES
October 23, 2007
Oct. 23 2002 Gunmen seized a crowded Moscow theater, taking hundreds hostage and threatening to kill them unless the Russian army pulled out of Chechnya.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 28, 2007
MOSCOW -- A Russian military helicopter crashed during a combat mission against separatist guerrillas in Russia's southern republic of Chechnya yesterday, killing at least 18 soldiers, authorities said. Initial reports said the craft was brought down by rebel fire, but officials said later that mechanical failure was more likely the cause. Three insurgents were also reported killed in the battle, but others apparently escaped into nearby mountains. The exact death toll remained unclear, with the Russian news agency RIA Novosti citing an unnamed local security source, reporting yesterday evening that 20 severely burned bodies had been found near the crash site.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Sun Foreign Reporter | April 24, 2007
CLARIFICATION The April 24 obituary of Boris Yeltsin carried a Moscow dateline and identified the writer as a Sun foreign reporter. The writer, Will Englund, was a Sun Moscow correspondent who reported on Yeltsin, and who is now on the newspaper's editorial board. MOSCOW -- Boris N. Yeltsin, the Russian leader who broke the Soviet Union and the system it had created, died yesterday in Moscow of complications from chronic heart problems. He was 76. Mr.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,Los Angeles Times | March 17, 2007
MOSCOW -- Russian federal police in war-battered Chechnya regularly engage in torture of detainees, the republic's Kremlin-backed president declared yesterday, as he announced a criminal investigation into the alleged abuse. President Ramzan Kadyrov, whose own Chechen forces have faced frequent allegations of human rights abuses, including kidnappings, torture and murder, singled out a detention facility known as ORB-2 run by the Russian Interior Ministry in the town of Urus-Martan. "The situation at the Operative and Investigative Bureau No. 2, where detainees are systematically subjected to torture, is totally unacceptable," Kadyrov told journalists in the Chechen capital, Grozny, according to the Russian news agency Interfax.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,Los Angeles Times | March 3, 2007
MOSCOW -- A Kremlin-backed strongman who has spearheaded efforts to pacify war-battered Chechnya through a mix of repression and economic reconstruction won legislative approval yesterday as president of the region in southern Russia. Ramzan Kadyrov, the son of a former Chechen president who was assassinated in 2004, is a former prime minister. He has been the most powerful figure in the region since his father's death but didn't turn 30, the minimum age for the presidency, until October.
NEWS
October 11, 2006
Russia is a country run by means of fear - not terror, by and large, but a quietly pervasive in-the-background fear. Fear of Chechens, fear of the law, fear of the arbitrariness of the state, fear of power. It serves President Vladimir V. Putin's purposes well because it distracts people, cows them, induces them to leave the politicians alone. To be not afraid is to be subversive. Anna Politkovskaya was not afraid, and now she is dead. She was the third journalist with Novaya Gazeta to be murdered since 2000.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2003
NEW YORK - Russian authorities have gone to tremendous lengths to isolate Chechnya and the war there from outside eyes, and for four years intrepid and dedicated reporters and human rights champions have been striving to document the brutalities of the conflict. But a few are now starting to ask themselves in discouragement whether there's any point to their own efforts. Does it matter what the world knows about Chechnya? Will the world act on what it does know? The record so far suggests that the answer is: Not likely.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 5, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Sergei Kovalyov, fired from Russia's top human rights post for his outspoken opposition to the bloody repression in Chechnya, called on President Clinton yesterday to condemn the Chechen conflict when he meets with Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin next week.Mr. Kovalyov said he worries that Mr. Clinton will employ "customary Western politeness" when he criticizes Russia's role in the breakaway republic, diluting the message to the point that it can be misunderstood by Russian politicians.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | October 8, 2006
MOSCOW -- A well-known Russian journalist who reported critically, relentlessly and fearlessly on everything from the Kremlin's policy in Chechnya to corruption in the military was shot dead yesterday, officials said, the latest in a string of killings of reporters in recent years. A neighbor found the body of Anna Politkovskaya, an investigative reporter for the newspaper Novaya Gazeta, in the elevator of her apartment building in Moscow, a handgun and four bullets nearby, Russian news agencies reported.
NEWS
September 15, 2006
The president of Chechnya - the rebellious redoubt in the Caucasus Mountains that was famous for kidnappings and beheadings and organized crime until the Russian army essentially blew it to smithereens, so that it is now principally famous for jihad and ambushes and wreckage and corruption - believes it has an image problem. He says Chechnya is a Russian word that by now is loaded with negative associations. He suggests that the whole world would feel better about the place if the people there adapted a local term and began calling it the Republic of Nokhchiin instead.
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