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By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
Former Ravens cornerback Cary Williams didn't leave his disdain for the New England Patriots here in Baltimore when he drove up I-95 and signed with the Philadelphia Eagles. While explaining to the Philadelphia Inquirer why he wasn't thrilled with the Eagles' upcoming joint practices with New England, Williams said Friday that the Patriots are “cheaters.” “I give them all the credit in the world, but one fact remains: they haven't won a Super Bowl since they got caught,” Williams said, in reference to the Patriots “Spygate” scandal in 2007.
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By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
Former Ravens cornerback Cary Williams didn't leave his disdain for the New England Patriots here in Baltimore when he drove up I-95 and signed with the Philadelphia Eagles. While explaining to the Philadelphia Inquirer why he wasn't thrilled with the Eagles' upcoming joint practices with New England, Williams said Friday that the Patriots are “cheaters.” “I give them all the credit in the world, but one fact remains: they haven't won a Super Bowl since they got caught,” Williams said, in reference to the Patriots “Spygate” scandal in 2007.
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SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | August 21, 2008
Seven members of the Joe Gibbs Racing team have been sanctioned by NASCAR for cheating, some suspended indefinitely. To cut to the chase, members on the mechanical side of the Gibbs team tried to thwart a chassis dyno test by placing magnetic spacers under the gas pedals of two cars used in the Nationwide Series. Now, I'd have a hard time explaining the difference between a magnetic spacer and a pencil sharpener, but it doesn't sound like something that can happen accidentally. So here's the question: Whether it's steroids in baseball, unethical taping of opponents in football, gambling-addicted basketball referees, fudging college athletes' transcripts, drugging horses or something called magnetic spacers in auto racing, is there a game anywhere that's on the level?
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2013
Toll cheaters who use Maryland E-ZPass lanes without a transponder will get hit with a $50 fine and could have their vehicle registration suspended under a law that took effect July 1. The Maryland Transportation Authority, operator of eight toll facilities, has begun the transition to the new collection process, which officials said will plug a loophole and allow them to recover as much as $7 million in overdue tolls. "It's not about money," said Bruce Gartner, MdTA acting executive secretary.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,Sun Reporter | January 30, 2008
The Maryland Racing Commission hopes to have rules in place by next year cracking down on "cheaters" who load up their horses with anabolic steroids, its chairman said yesterday. "We're going to have some form of regulation," chairman John Franzone said after the commission met yesterday at Laurel Park. "We're shooting to get this in place by January [2009]." The commission also approved a change yesterday in the live racing schedule at Laurel. Beginning March 2, the meet will move to a Thursday-through-Sunday schedule instead of the current Wednesday-Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By HARTFORD COURANT | August 3, 2003
Hester Prynne got off easy. For an adulterer of Kobe Bryant's stature, no scarlet letter "A" stitched to a basketball jersey would do. Instead, the tarnished NBA star branded himself on global television by confessing his infidelity (while denying a more serious sexual crime). But now, even Joe and Jane Cheater risk a degree of such high-profile exposure. Like a romantic emergency broadcast system, a Web site called cheatinglovers.com has been created to shame two-timers who lurk from bedroom to backseat to hotel suite.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Jeff Barker and Childs Walker and Jeff Barker,Sun reporters | October 6, 2007
East German female swimmers with impossibly broad shoulders. European cyclists who roared over the Pyrenees without ever seeming to tire. A Canadian sprinter whose thighs looked as big as a normal man's torso. Twenty years ago, our images of sports dopers dwelled on foreign competitors snatching titles and medals from U.S. athletes believed to be clean. It made for an easy hero-villain dichotomy. But with Marion Jones' admission yesterday that she lied in denying steroid use before the 2000 Olympics, the old story line was driven deeper into the past, and another prominent American athlete was implicated in the drug scandals sweeping sports.
SPORTS
February 19, 2004
Sports has a set of clear rules. Three strikes, you're out. Ten yards for a first down. Twenty-four seconds to shoot. To play the game, follow the rules. Using steroids is not following the rules. Remember the old playground taunt? "Cheaters never prosper." The problem is, in the current climate, cheaters do indeed prosper. They set records. They win championships. They may even endorse your favorite soft drink. It used to be that the smart player was the one who had the best feel for the game, who was always in the right place at the right time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [SAM SESSA] | January 11, 2007
The Cheaters at the 8x10 The lowdown -- Get ready to rock tomorrow night at the 8x10. Annapolis-based rock 'n' rollers the Cheaters are the headliners. They released their debut full-length, self-titled album last summer. Alternative rocker Viki Nova and eighty1south, a group fronted by guitarist Jennifer Van Meter and singer Caity Lynn Fisher, will also perform. If you go -- Doors open at 8 p.m. Tickets are $8. The venue is at 8-10 E. Cross St. For more information, call 410-625-2000 or go to the8x10.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 17, 1999
JUST WHEN you think it can't get any worse, it does.If you doubt that, you obviously haven't heard about "Cheaters." I hadn't heard about it myself until a reader faxed a news story to me. It seems that "Cheaters" is a new syndicated series where unfaithful partners are caught and confronted on camera.According to the article, it works like this. You suspect your partner is having an affair. You contact "Cheaters," which sends a private investigator out to confirm your fears. As the unfaithful lover is unknowingly filmed breaking vows and commandments right and left, "Cheaters" drops you into the scene like a hand grenade in a room full of crystal.
NEWS
July 8, 2011
Regarding Baltimore schools CEO Andrés Alonso's handling of the cheating scandal in which test scores were altered by school personnel, when these devious practices became public the guilty teachers should have been charged with committing a crime, brought to trial and punished accordingly — through reductions of salary, probation or firing. Also, it is quite evident that these teachers had absolutely no respect for Mr. Alonso once they believed they could do as they pleased.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | August 21, 2008
Seven members of the Joe Gibbs Racing team have been sanctioned by NASCAR for cheating, some suspended indefinitely. To cut to the chase, members on the mechanical side of the Gibbs team tried to thwart a chassis dyno test by placing magnetic spacers under the gas pedals of two cars used in the Nationwide Series. Now, I'd have a hard time explaining the difference between a magnetic spacer and a pencil sharpener, but it doesn't sound like something that can happen accidentally. So here's the question: Whether it's steroids in baseball, unethical taping of opponents in football, gambling-addicted basketball referees, fudging college athletes' transcripts, drugging horses or something called magnetic spacers in auto racing, is there a game anywhere that's on the level?
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun reporter | August 10, 2008
Over the past few weeks, even before the torch was lit, dozens of athletes from around the world have tested positive for banned drugs and have been barred from the Beijing Olympics. Sports officials say this shows their new anti-drug attack is working. "The gap between regulators and cheaters has narrowed, and it will continue to narrow," says David Howman, director of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), the international organization that oversees drug testing for the Olympics. WADA and the International Olympic Committee will perform more than 4,500 doping tests during the Olympics, almost 1,000 more than four years ago. The IOC's Beijing lab operates around the clock with 180 scientists and staffers.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,Sun Reporter | January 30, 2008
The Maryland Racing Commission hopes to have rules in place by next year cracking down on "cheaters" who load up their horses with anabolic steroids, its chairman said yesterday. "We're going to have some form of regulation," chairman John Franzone said after the commission met yesterday at Laurel Park. "We're shooting to get this in place by January [2009]." The commission also approved a change yesterday in the live racing schedule at Laurel. Beginning March 2, the meet will move to a Thursday-through-Sunday schedule instead of the current Wednesday-Saturday.
NEWS
By David Frenkil | December 28, 2007
The idea staggered me. I remembered, of course, that the World Series had been fixed in 1919, but if I had thought of it at all I would have thought of it as something that merely happened, the end of an inevitable chain. It never occurred to me that one man could start to play with the faith of fifty million people - with the single-mindedness of a burglar blowing a safe. - F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby (1925) Since the Mitchell Report was released this month, it has become almost a clich?
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,Sun reporter | December 22, 2007
Major League Baseball officials have spoken of former Sen. George Mitchell's report on steroids as a way to put a stamp of understanding on the past and move toward a cleaner future. But those who have battled doping for much longer in cycling, track and field, and other sports said that's wishful thinking. Hard experience has taught them that the economic and competitive drives behind doping inevitably lead athletes to newer, more effective, less detectable substances and methods. "What we have to do is constantly look at the advances that are being made in medical science in a proper way and imagine how they might be abused by athletes," said David Howman, director general of the World Anti-Doping Agency.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | November 6, 1990
Some would suggest that Election Day is the perfect time to raise the issue of whether cheaters really do prosper. It is merely a coincidence that I'm doing so, but in the words of Bill Bidwill (I've never actually heard him say this, but I'm sure he has many times), "Sounds good to me."Homer, the Greek poet and avid outdoorsman, first brought it up years ago, way back even before Artie Donovan was playing for the Colts. "Evil deeds do not prosper," he wrote. (An editor tightened up the language for him, according to legend.
NEWS
May 23, 2007
As any educator knows, cheating is as old as testing. So news that three students at Severna Park High School may have cheated on an Advanced Placement test is not surprising. But it's certainly disturbing. The Educational Testing Service, which administered the exam on behalf of the College Board, has rightly canceled the scores for more than 40 students in one testing room after finding that a proctor didn't do his job. Anne Arundel County school officials made the correct decision to keep those students from retaking the test tomorrow.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | December 15, 2007
More than 700,000 Maryland property owners are due to receive new state assessment notices this month and many know they won't be taxed on the full value of their homes, thanks to assessment caps the state and many local jurisdictions apply. But what they probably don't know is that a little-noticed change in Maryland's property tax laws has converted this protection from an automatic benefit to one that each homeowner must apply for -- although most homeowners will have five years to file the paperwork.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Jeff Barker and Childs Walker and Jeff Barker,Sun reporters | October 6, 2007
East German female swimmers with impossibly broad shoulders. European cyclists who roared over the Pyrenees without ever seeming to tire. A Canadian sprinter whose thighs looked as big as a normal man's torso. Twenty years ago, our images of sports dopers dwelled on foreign competitors snatching titles and medals from U.S. athletes believed to be clean. It made for an easy hero-villain dichotomy. But with Marion Jones' admission yesterday that she lied in denying steroid use before the 2000 Olympics, the old story line was driven deeper into the past, and another prominent American athlete was implicated in the drug scandals sweeping sports.
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