Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChautauqua
IN THE NEWS

Chautauqua

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 27, 2004
On July 24, 2004, RUTH KRAVITZ (nee Shapiro); beloved wife of the late Hyman Kravitz; loving mother of Dr. Robert Kravitz of Philadelphia, PA and Willard Kravitz of Baltimore, MD; adored grandmother of Heather Friedman and Michael Kravitz; dear great-grandmother of Amanda Friedman, dearest friend and long time companion of Doris Kroll. Services and interment on Wednesday, July 28, 2004 at 1 PM at the Baltimore Hebrew Congregation Cemetery, 2100 Belair Rd. Please omit flowers. Contributions in her memory should be directed to the Chautauqua Foundation, P.O. Box 28, Chautauqua, NY 14722-0028.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 14, 2006
Grier C. Taylor, a poet and retired vocal soloist, died of a heart attack Jan. 1 at her Homeland residence. She was 58. Born in Baltimore and raised in Homeland, she was a 1966 graduate of Bryn Mawr School. She earned her bachelor's degree in music and voice in 1970 from what is now Towson University. During her 30-year career as a soloist, Miss Taylor performed locally and in Europe. She won honorable mention in the American Opera Society's voice contest in Washington, and received a scholarship to the Chautauqua Institution in Chautauqua, N.Y., where she trained with Frances Yeend, a Metropolitan Opera star.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 1, 2004
On Monday, August 30, 2004, SYLVIA L. VOGEL (nee Levinson), age 96, loving wife of the late H. Leonard Vogel; beloved mother of Dr. Robert Vogel, of Edgewater, MD, and the late Janet Vogel Dorfman; devoted mother-in-law of Sharyn Vogel and Paul Dorfman; dear sister of Dr. Leonard Levinson, of Sarasota, FL, devoted sister-in-law of Irene Levinson. Also survived by five loving grandchildren and eleven loving great-grandchildren. Sylvia was a masterful New York City school teacher for 35 years, world traveler, and an independent spirit.
NEWS
November 30, 2005
On November 22, 2005, RICHARD C. DONKERVOET beloved husband of Carolyn M. Donkervoet, loving father of Daralice Donkervoet Boles, Sharon Donkervoet Credit and John Cornelius Donkervoet, dear brother of Ann Sweet and Helene Buell, cherished grandfather of Leslie, John and Laura Boles, Katherine, Kimberly and Jodi Credit, Oliver and Emily Donkervoet. A memorial service will be celebrated in Brown Memorial Woodbrook Presbyterian Church, 6200 N. Charles Street on Friday, December 2, at 2 P.M. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in Mr. Donkervoet's name to the Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum Drive, Baltimore, MD, 21218 and/or the Chautauqua Foundation Development Office, POB 28, Chautauqua, NY, 14722.
NEWS
November 30, 2005
On November 22, 2005, RICHARD C. DONKERVOET beloved husband of Carolyn M. Donkervoet, loving father of Daralice Donkervoet Boles, Sharon Donkervoet Credit and John Cornelius Donkervoet, dear brother of Ann Sweet and Helene Buell, cherished grandfather of Leslie, John and Laura Boles, Katherine, Kimberly and Jodi Credit, Oliver and Emily Donkervoet. A memorial service will be celebrated in Brown Memorial Woodbrook Presbyterian Church, 6200 N. Charles Street on Friday, December 2, at 2 P.M. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in Mr. Donkervoet's name to the Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum Drive, Baltimore, MD, 21218 and/or the Chautauqua Foundation Development Office, POB 28, Chautauqua, NY, 14722.
NEWS
January 14, 2006
Grier C. Taylor, a poet and retired vocal soloist, died of a heart attack Jan. 1 at her Homeland residence. She was 58. Born in Baltimore and raised in Homeland, she was a 1966 graduate of Bryn Mawr School. She earned her bachelor's degree in music and voice in 1970 from what is now Towson University. During her 30-year career as a soloist, Miss Taylor performed locally and in Europe. She won honorable mention in the American Opera Society's voice contest in Washington, and received a scholarship to the Chautauqua Institution in Chautauqua, N.Y., where she trained with Frances Yeend, a Metropolitan Opera star.
NEWS
By Compiled from the archives of the Historical Society of Carroll County | July 13, 1997
25 years ago Although Bell's Snack Bar, outside of Taneytown on the Emmittsburg Road, had been swamped with water to the roof during the flood last month and one of the ice cream freezers ended up in a tree 15 feet above the ground, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Livesay are hopeful that they will be back in business this weekend. The silver panel truck, circled in the Record's flood picture last week, was standing high and dry on the other side of the building where the current had swept it. But a small key to one of the appliances still lay where it had been placed before the flood, unmoved by waters which had swirled over it. -- The Carroll Record, July 13, 1972.
NEWS
By Neal R. Peirce | June 16, 1997
CHAUTAUQUA, N.Y. -- America's first-ever ''Chautauqua'' on regional governance was held June 1-4 where great discourse on society's future has flourished since the 1870s -- the Chautauqua Institution south of Buffalo in upstate New York.Delegates came from 15 states and Canada, including such citi-state areas as Chattanooga, Cleveland, Portland, Oregon, and Hamilton-Wentworth, Ontario. They brought success stories of reinvigorating inner cities, strengthening older suburbs, combating sprawl and pushing sustainable economic development.
FEATURES
By Jean Allen and Jean Allen,SUN-SENTINEL, SOUTH FLORIDA | December 7, 1997
Do you have any information about an enclave in Michigan with a program like that of the famous Chautauqua in New York state?The Midwestern near-clone of Chautauqua is Bay View, in Petoskey, Mich. The city is a comfortable, slightly old-fashioned place along Little Traverse Bay, an arm of Lake Michigan, about 250 miles northwest of Detroit. Petoskey has been a summer resort for Midwesterners ever since the first railroad arrived in 1873, and Bay View has existed nearly that long.Since the 1890s, the original Chautauqua, on the identically named lake in central New York state, has attracted thousands of visitors per week in summer, offering "intellectual stimulation, spiritual balm and cultural enrichment."
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | August 28, 2005
Music, art and philosophy, It's all right here for you to see. 50 cents is all you pay, So get your Daily here today. THE CHAUTAUQUAN (N.Y.) Daily, that is, serious-minded, going strong and breaking even financially. Oh, and basking in the affection of its readers! Is this journalistic heaven, a product that's good for the reader and good for the community? Probably - and probably not possible elsewhere in this complex world. But maybe The Chautauquan Daily represents, at age 132, a niche paper for today and tomorrow.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | August 28, 2005
Music, art and philosophy, It's all right here for you to see. 50 cents is all you pay, So get your Daily here today. THE CHAUTAUQUAN (N.Y.) Daily, that is, serious-minded, going strong and breaking even financially. Oh, and basking in the affection of its readers! Is this journalistic heaven, a product that's good for the reader and good for the community? Probably - and probably not possible elsewhere in this complex world. But maybe The Chautauquan Daily represents, at age 132, a niche paper for today and tomorrow.
NEWS
September 1, 2004
On Monday, August 30, 2004, SYLVIA L. VOGEL (nee Levinson), age 96, loving wife of the late H. Leonard Vogel; beloved mother of Dr. Robert Vogel, of Edgewater, MD, and the late Janet Vogel Dorfman; devoted mother-in-law of Sharyn Vogel and Paul Dorfman; dear sister of Dr. Leonard Levinson, of Sarasota, FL, devoted sister-in-law of Irene Levinson. Also survived by five loving grandchildren and eleven loving great-grandchildren. Sylvia was a masterful New York City school teacher for 35 years, world traveler, and an independent spirit.
NEWS
July 27, 2004
On July 24, 2004, RUTH KRAVITZ (nee Shapiro); beloved wife of the late Hyman Kravitz; loving mother of Dr. Robert Kravitz of Philadelphia, PA and Willard Kravitz of Baltimore, MD; adored grandmother of Heather Friedman and Michael Kravitz; dear great-grandmother of Amanda Friedman, dearest friend and long time companion of Doris Kroll. Services and interment on Wednesday, July 28, 2004 at 1 PM at the Baltimore Hebrew Congregation Cemetery, 2100 Belair Rd. Please omit flowers. Contributions in her memory should be directed to the Chautauqua Foundation, P.O. Box 28, Chautauqua, NY 14722-0028.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 20, 2002
MOUNTAIN LAKE PARK - After running a children's summer camp in Garrett County for nearly 20 years and living there year-round, you would think Fred and Nancy Learey would decide to take it easy. But instead the couple decided to renovate and expand a historic cottage not far from the camp. "That was hard work and a lot of responsibility," Fred Learey said about running Camp Minnetoska. "We reached the point where it was time to do something different." The Leareys knew they wanted to stay in the area after selling the camp.
TRAVEL
By Deborah Williams and Deborah Williams,Special to the Sun | January 28, 2001
The tundra swans have already flown south after a brief winter appearance on Chautauqua Lake, but winter enthusiasts are flocking to this idyllic southwestern corner of New York for skiing, ice fishing, sleigh rides and festivals. Though the 781-acre Chautauqua Institution on the shores of Chautauqua Lake is essentially a summer community, the institution welcomes guests year-round. The 127-year-old facility is a national historic district known for its artsy, intellectual summers. The institution was founded in 1874 as a summer study and conference center for liberal arts and religious instruction.
NEWS
August 25, 1999
CHAUTAUQUA, N.Y. -- Even the people who own homes on the grounds of the Chautauqua Institution must pay a fee to get in during the season.Chautauqua is a gated community; admission is charged every day but Sunday, although children under 12 and adults over 90 get in free. Tickets range from $6 for an afternoon, to $190 for a week, to $815 for the nine-week season.Once you're in, there are other expenses. Admission is charged for some entertainment (this year's performers included Wynonna and the Beach Boys)
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 3, 1999
Despite the lingering piles of snow that remain as a reminder of the 56 inches that blanketed Mountain Lake Park over the winter, daffodils there are starting to poke their heads up through the ground. The cold is releasing its grip on this once-fashionable Garrett County resort, which dates to 1881.Soon shutters will be thrown back and wicker porch furniture returned to broad Victorian porches as its 1,300 residents prepare for another summer in what was once called "America's ideal summer resort."
NEWS
By GEORGE HAHN II | March 31, 1991
The recently-announced University of Maryland plan for "distance learning" may make for good instruction. But make no mistake. It will not be good education.A branch of an Orwellian system called "Mind Extension U," the program, with admirable intention, would bring courses into the comfort of the home via cable television and video to reach students -- salesmen, housewives and other busy people -- who cannot take time to travel to the campus. A high-tech democratic version of a chicken in every pot, the system would put a professor in every parlor and ultimately a B.A. on many resumes.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1999
MOUNTAIN LAKE PARK -- Dolores Hayden can't get over how hot it's been. On her spacious front porch last week, shaded from the afternoon sun, it must have been all of 85 degrees.A century ago, when Baltimore streets sweltered, city dwellers who could afford to boarded trains to escape to this small Garrett County community. From the early 1880s until about 1920, this was one of the mid-Atlantic region's premier summer resorts.Deep Creek Lake has long since supplanted Mountain Lake Park as Western Maryland's vacation destination.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 3, 1999
Despite the lingering piles of snow that remain as a reminder of the 56 inches that blanketed Mountain Lake Park over the winter, daffodils there are starting to poke their heads up through the ground. The cold is releasing its grip on this once-fashionable Garrett County resort, which dates to 1881.Soon shutters will be thrown back and wicker porch furniture returned to broad Victorian porches as its 1,300 residents prepare for another summer in what was once called "America's ideal summer resort."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.