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By Jerry Bembry | November 21, 1991
He had been a successful football coach at every level before coming to the Navy, so it's no surprise that the administrators at the academy are completely behind coach George Chaump, despite the team's 0-9 start.As he has said the entire season, Navy athletic director Jack Lengyel reiterated yesterday that the struggling football team is in good hands."I'm pleased with George Chaump as a football coach, as I've said all along," Lengyel said. "He has done a fine job under extenuating football circumstances.
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By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1995
Early Sunday morning, when the Naval Academy football team returned home after a 27-17 defeat at Rutgers, the entire brigade of midshipmen waited in a driving rainstorm to applaud the team's determined effort.The scene reflected the way new head coach Charlie Weatherbie's enthusiasm has infected the campus, where losing football games had become a habit over the past 12 seasons. Weatherbie, who guided the Mids to a stunning, 33-2 victory over Southern Methodist in his Navy debut, takes a 1-1 team into tomorrow night's homecoming game against Wake Forest (0-3)
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By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Evening Sun Staff | October 24, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Coach George Chaump sees all these Nav freshmen and sophomores performing before him, and he's not sure what to make of the spectacle.No fewer than seven plebes are making major contributions. Tom Pritchard, the Mids' leading receiver, has started since the opener, the first plebe to do that since World War II.Another freshman, Jim Kubiak, has started once and may start again when the 0-6 Middies entertain 6-1 Delaware Saturday in their homecoming game at Navy-Marine Corps Stadium.
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By BILL TANTON | September 7, 1995
"Maybe now things will get back to normal," says Cal Ripken, major-league baseball's new champion iron man, Mr. 2,131.Maybe things will get back to normal, whatever that is. They've been anything but normal lately at Camden Yards.After the Hollywood-like love-ins of the last two nights as Cal caught Lou Gehrig and then passed him, you have to believe a return to normalcy is going to take a while.For one thing, this unassuming, clean-living, 35-year-old family man from little Aberdeen, has changed Baltimore.
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By Jerry Bembry | September 11, 1990
Former Navy quarterback Gary McIntosh, who apparently left the team last week after not being named the starter, met briefly with coach George Chaump yesterday to discuss the situation.The meeting, which McIntosh requested, came four days after the senior was told that Alton Grizzard would start last Saturday's game against Richmond. McIntosh left the team after being told."He came in to visit me and we had a nice chat, but he didn't ask to come back on the team," Chaump said last night. "It was a friendly chat, but there are no new developments."
SPORTS
By From Staff Reports | November 27, 1993
Navy has extended the contract of football coach George Chaump, who heads into next week's game against Army with an 11-32 record in four years at the academy.Chaump is in the final year of a four-year contract. Neither Chaump nor athletic director Jack Lengyel revealed terms of the extension or the options that it includes. Lengyel said he recommended the extension to the academy's athletic board of control, and that it was approved yesterday by Naval Academy Superintendent Rear Admiral Thomas C. Lynch.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry | November 21, 1991
He had been a successful football coach at every level before coming to Navy, so it's no surprise that the administrators at the academy are completely behind coach George Chaump, despite the team's 0-9 start.As he has said the entire season, Navy athletic director Jack Lengyel said yesterday that the football team is in good hands."I'm pleased with George Chaump as a football coach, as I've said all along," Lengyel said. "He has done a fine job under extenuating football circumstances. When he has an opportunity under a full four-year football structure, he will bring the Navy team back to its successful mode of the past."
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By Bill Tanton | December 6, 1990
GEORGE CHAUMP, in his first year as football coach at Navy, appears to be doing what many thought impossible at the academy: winning. The easier schedule notwithstanding, Chaump's Middies have a 5-5 record and will finish with Navy's first winning season in eight years if they beat Army Saturday in Philadelphia."
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By Phil Jackman | December 2, 1993
Reading Time: Two Minutes.One of the things that has been driving Navy coach George Chaump nuts for the past month is who or what sprang the trap door that turned a promising Middies season into well, bilge water?"
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By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | December 2, 1993
When Naval Academy officials went against standard operating procedures by rehiring George Chaump before the end of the season, it served the dual purpose of lending continuity to the football program while also serving as a motivational weapon for the Midshipmen in their traditional battle with Army on Saturday.Only last week at a pre-game news conference at Giants Stadium, athletic director Jack Lengyel said Chaump's future would be weighed by the Athletic Board of Control after the Army game.
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By PHIL JACKMAN | December 19, 1994
The weekend Navy suffered its third straight devastating loss to Army in football and George Chaump lost his coaching job at the academy, Art Schlichter lost his freedom. Schlichter, recall, was a first-round choice and fourth overall in the NFL draft for the Baltimore Colts in 1982.Politics isn't the only pastime that makes for strange bedfellows, as the saying goes. Add sports to the list.Chaump and Schlichter will always be linked closely, particularly in the minds of Ohio State football fans.
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By BILL TANTON | December 6, 1994
In the yard at the Naval Academy, there was no visible sign that The Big Game had been lost once again, and no sign at all that another head football coach was packing up and leaving Annapolis.As classes changed in the early afternoon yesterday, midshipmen in their Navy blues flooded the area and called out to classmates about other things."Seven days from tomorrow I'll be getting on a plane," one shouted ecstatically."You coming to the basketball game tonight?" another Middie called to a friend.
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By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Writer | December 6, 1994
Doug Williams said yesterday that he did not consider himself ready to apply for the head football coaching job at the Naval Academy after George Chaump's firing Sunday.Williams came to the academy this season as an assistant coach in charge of running backs and later became quarterback coach."It was a great learning experience working for George this year," said Williams, who first met Chaump in 1979 when he was quarterback for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and Chaump was an assistant coach."But I don't think I'm a candidate at this time," Williams said.
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By PHIL JACKMAN | December 5, 1994
Next to the words duty, honor and country, perhaps no word is heard more often around the military academies than that of mission.At Navy, just one of every 10 applicants is chosen to undertake a regimen designed "to prepare midshipmen morally, mentally and physically to be professional officers in the naval service."Maybe it's time to add the words "to win football games and defeat Army in particular" to the stated charge of the military reservation on the banks of the Severn River.For the third time in just eight years and the second time in the six-year career of Jack Lengyel as athletic director, Navy has dumped its football coach, in this case George Chaump.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Writer | December 5, 1994
Before Saturday's frustrating, 22-20 loss to Army in Philadelphia, Naval Academy football coach George Chaump was asked by a sportscaster whether he thought it was more important to have a winning record or beat West Point."
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Writer | December 2, 1994
With his future as the Naval Academy's football coach reportedly in jeopardy, George Chaump has taken a strong stance in his defense on the eve of the season-ending game with Army in Philadelphia.This time a year ago, Chaump received a vote of confidence from athletic director Jack Lengyel in the form of a year's contract extension."We wanted to give George a chance to teach his senior class of kids he personally recruited," said Lengyel. "But now we'll follow our usual procedure of evaluating the situation as soon as the season ends."
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By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Writer | December 5, 1994
Before Saturday's frustrating, 22-20 loss to Army in Philadelphia, Naval Academy football coach George Chaump was asked by a sportscaster whether he thought it was more important to have a winning record or beat West Point."
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | December 2, 1993
When Naval Academy officials went against standard operating procedures by rehiring George Chaump before the end of the season, it served the dual purpose of lending continuity to the program while also serving as a motivational weapon for the Midshipmen in their traditional battle with Army on Saturday.Only last week at a pre-game news conference at Giants Stadium, athletic director Jack Lengyel said Chaump's future would be weighed by the Athletic Board of Control after the Army game. But Lengyel said yesterday that there was no need to wait.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Writer | November 23, 1994
PHILADELPHIA -- Every day since spring football drills began April 9, Navy coach George Chaump has started practice in Annapolis by placing a ball on the right hash mark of the 8-yard line.Sophomore place-kicker Ryan Bucchianeri carefully marks off his steps and remembers to keep his head down as holder Tony Solliday receives the snap and sets the ball in proper kicking position. Bucchianeri then swings his right foot through and the ball almost invariably splits the goal posts."I'd say we've had close to 90 practices this season," said Chaump, "and I recall Ryan making every field goal but one."
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Writer | November 20, 1994
His football team turned in its most impressive performance of the season in upsetting Rice, 29-17, but yesterday Navy coach George Chaump expressed regrets."
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