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By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 23, 2006
Just as Chaucer's pilgrims traveled to Canterbury in April, so has the Royal Shakespeare Company chosen this month to journey to Washington's Kennedy Center with its adaptation of The Canterbury Tales. The three-week run is the sole American engagement of this two-part, six-hour Chaucer marathon. Bawdy, brazen, belligerent, and at times tedious, the production is a demanding exercise for the 20-member cast -- and for the audience. THE CANTERBURY TALES / / Through May 7 / / Kennedy Center, Washington / / 800-444-1324 or kennedycenter.
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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2013
Last year at the American Copy Editors Society's conference in New Orleans, David Minthorn and Darrell Christian of the Associated Press Stylebook announced some revisions of the stylebook, among them a relaxation of the prohibition on hopefully as a sentence adverb. This was greeted with excitement.* ACES is meeting in St. Louis in April, and there is still time to make good on some necessary changes to stun and excite this year's audience I [cough] have a couple of suggestions.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 9, 2003
When Christy Stanlake was introduced to the Naval Academy as a graduate student, she never expected the military school to have a theater program, let alone to teach its midshipmen the essentials of drama in a few years time. But in her second year as English department faculty member leading the academy's Masqueraders acting troupe, Stanlake hopes to build on last year's successes with a performance of John Guare's Chaucer in Rome. Stanlake, 31, got her introduction to the military school while performing Harold Pinter's two-person play Ashes to Ashes at a conference in London, where she ran into Anne Marie Drew.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2012
I am not a bomb-throwing anarchist; I observe the stanch/staunch distinction and never identify plastic foam cups or dishes as Styrofoam. Nevertheless, there is a good deal of rubbish in the Associated Press Stylebook , entries that are badly outdated or simply wrong-headed. Moved purely by a spirit of generosity, I offer a few suggestions for improvement . The split verbs entry There is nothing wrong with placing an adverb between the preposition to and a verb in English, and never has been since Chaucer was a schoolboy.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | April 2, 1995
Havre de Grace. -- In the cool nights the libidinous crescendo of the peepers almost shakes the house. Cows, their hormones raging, ignore their nursing calves and bawl for the bull. Egg-laden rockfish are moving into the Chesapeake shallows. It must be April.T.S. Eliot, who never fed cattle through a February cold snap or spent a steambath August working in Baltimore, obscurely called April the cruelest month. Could he have meant that in an intellectual sense? Anyway, in the winter-deadened brain of an aging English major, when April comes old memories stir.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2013
Last year at the American Copy Editors Society's conference in New Orleans, David Minthorn and Darrell Christian of the Associated Press Stylebook announced some revisions of the stylebook, among them a relaxation of the prohibition on hopefully as a sentence adverb. This was greeted with excitement.* ACES is meeting in St. Louis in April, and there is still time to make good on some necessary changes to stun and excite this year's audience I [cough] have a couple of suggestions.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2012
I am not a bomb-throwing anarchist; I observe the stanch/staunch distinction and never identify plastic foam cups or dishes as Styrofoam. Nevertheless, there is a good deal of rubbish in the Associated Press Stylebook , entries that are badly outdated or simply wrong-headed. Moved purely by a spirit of generosity, I offer a few suggestions for improvement . The split verbs entry There is nothing wrong with placing an adverb between the preposition to and a verb in English, and never has been since Chaucer was a schoolboy.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | October 24, 1993
Q: My daughter is a serious student of Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales." Can you tell me if there is a day-trip tour from London to Canterbury following in the footsteps of the pilgrims?A: Tour Guides International, a group that represents guides registered with the London Tourist Board, is a specialist in theme tours, of which yours would be one.The company says that a one-day tour to Canterbury along the route of the pilgrims would take about 10 hours. It would start at Old London Bridge in Southwark, on the south bank of the River Thames, where the pilgrims gathered.
FEATURES
By Evie Rapport and Evie Rapport,KANSAS CITY STAR | July 28, 1996
You get off the coach from London in Canterbury's modest little bus station, trot down Gravel Walk past a parking lot and come face to face with the Marlowe Arcade.The Marlowe Arcade? As in Christopher Marlowe? This is appalling. A shopping center named for the playwright murdered 400 years ago? Shopping bags bearing the name of the pyrotechnic creator of "Dr. Faustus" and "The Jew of Malta"?If they've done that to Marlowe -- who was only born here in 1564 -- what have they done to Geoffrey Chaucer, the 14th-century poet who immortalized the town in "The Canterbury Tales"?
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 9, 2005
Three directors, two dozen actors and three musicians will bring 19 of Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales to life when the Royal Shakespeare Company performs Mike Poulton's two-part adaptation of the late-14th century stories at Washington's Kennedy Center, April 15-May 7. The use of three directors - RSC associate director Gregory Doran along with Jonathan Mumby and Rebecca Gatwood - is intended to reflect the numerous voices in the Tales, a...
NEWS
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 23, 2006
Just as Chaucer's pilgrims traveled to Canterbury in April, so has the Royal Shakespeare Company chosen this month to journey to Washington's Kennedy Center with its adaptation of The Canterbury Tales. The three-week run is the sole American engagement of this two-part, six-hour Chaucer marathon. Bawdy, brazen, belligerent, and at times tedious, the production is a demanding exercise for the 20-member cast -- and for the audience. THE CANTERBURY TALES / / Through May 7 / / Kennedy Center, Washington / / 800-444-1324 or kennedycenter.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 9, 2003
When Christy Stanlake was introduced to the Naval Academy as a graduate student, she never expected the military school to have a theater program, let alone to teach its midshipmen the essentials of drama in a few years time. But in her second year as English department faculty member leading the academy's Masqueraders acting troupe, Stanlake hopes to build on last year's successes with a performance of John Guare's Chaucer in Rome. Stanlake, 31, got her introduction to the military school while performing Harold Pinter's two-person play Ashes to Ashes at a conference in London, where she ran into Anne Marie Drew.
FEATURES
By Evie Rapport and Evie Rapport,KANSAS CITY STAR | July 28, 1996
You get off the coach from London in Canterbury's modest little bus station, trot down Gravel Walk past a parking lot and come face to face with the Marlowe Arcade.The Marlowe Arcade? As in Christopher Marlowe? This is appalling. A shopping center named for the playwright murdered 400 years ago? Shopping bags bearing the name of the pyrotechnic creator of "Dr. Faustus" and "The Jew of Malta"?If they've done that to Marlowe -- who was only born here in 1564 -- what have they done to Geoffrey Chaucer, the 14th-century poet who immortalized the town in "The Canterbury Tales"?
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | April 2, 1995
Havre de Grace. -- In the cool nights the libidinous crescendo of the peepers almost shakes the house. Cows, their hormones raging, ignore their nursing calves and bawl for the bull. Egg-laden rockfish are moving into the Chesapeake shallows. It must be April.T.S. Eliot, who never fed cattle through a February cold snap or spent a steambath August working in Baltimore, obscurely called April the cruelest month. Could he have meant that in an intellectual sense? Anyway, in the winter-deadened brain of an aging English major, when April comes old memories stir.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | October 24, 1993
Q: My daughter is a serious student of Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales." Can you tell me if there is a day-trip tour from London to Canterbury following in the footsteps of the pilgrims?A: Tour Guides International, a group that represents guides registered with the London Tourist Board, is a specialist in theme tours, of which yours would be one.The company says that a one-day tour to Canterbury along the route of the pilgrims would take about 10 hours. It would start at Old London Bridge in Southwark, on the south bank of the River Thames, where the pilgrims gathered.
NEWS
November 22, 2009
On November 19, 2009, Michael Brian Gold Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS., INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road, at Mount Wilson Lane on Sunday, November 22 at 3 P.M. Interment Hebrew Young Mens Cemetery, 5800 Windsor Mill Road. Please omit flowers. Contributions in his memory may be sent to the charity of your choice. In mourning at 4550 Chaucer Way, #205, Owings Mills, MD 21117 thru Tuesday. sollevinson.com
NEWS
By Margaret Doyle | February 14, 1997
In Chaucer's wood, the branches bud with birds.Song showers fill the air.Each little heart, no bigger than a corn,with diminutive lust is stirredfor on this date,the legends say, each birdwill surely find its mate.Now windswept parking lots are bare.Under eaves, small birds cluster,vociferous in the drug store's neon light.They mustseem choir to pilgrims come to venerate,in shrines of scent and powder and paint,the candy heart of the old red satin saint.Pub Date: 2/14/97@
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