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NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | March 27, 1995
Chattanooga. -- On a USAir flight into town, steward Mike Piland enthuses about Chattanooga's electric buses and downtown transit, interesting restaurants, the restored Warehouse Row selling designer clothes at discount prices and the Tennessee Aquarium.Neal R. Peirce writes a column on state and urban affairs.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2013
Shirley D. Patterson, a retired chemist who taught at what is now Community College of Baltimore County at Essex, died July 15 of heart failure at her Chattanooga, Tenn., home. She was 68. The daughter of an educator and a homemaker, Shirley Dale Patterson, who was known as Dale Patterson, was born and raised in Baltimore. After graduating from Western High School in 1961, she earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry in 1965 from Washington College in Chestertown, where she was president of the Washington College Society of Sciences and was co-winner of the Clark-Porter Medal for having most clearly improved campus life through her character and integrity.
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NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | May 3, 1992
CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. -- In search of a Baltimore-style rejuvenation, this conservation-oriented city on the Tennessee River has joined the growing ranks of American cities that have opened aquariums.A mile-long parade of 700 children dressed as schools of fish launched a three-day "Festival of Rivers" that Chattanooga is throwing this weekend to celebrate the opening of the $45 million Tennessee Aquarium, which Mayor Gene Roberts calls "our very own, home-grown cathedral of conservation.""The aquarium will establish us as men and women who celebrate clean water and clean air as the lifeblood which sustains us all," he said in opening ceremonies Friday.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun and By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2013
You probably won't hear these buses coming. If they show up as expected on the Howard Transit Green Route in the spring of 2015, they'll be the first of their kind in Maryland to run a municipal loop. They will likely be greeted with fanfare, even if they won't make much noise themselves - since they'll run entirely on electricity. "They're very quiet," said John Powell, administrator for the county's Office of Transportation. "One of the interesting aspects of the electric buses is you hear everything else" but the engine.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | March 22, 1997
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. -- The train stopped running for Chattanooga last night.Coach Mack McCarthy and his Mocs from the Southern Conference had their heartwarming stay in the Southeast Regional end in a 71-65 semifinal loss to Providence, which itself didn't exactly head into the NCAA tournament with great expectations.When it meets Arizona in tomorrow's regional final at the Birmingham-Jefferson Civic Center, 10th-seeded Providence (24-11) will attempt to become the lowest seed to reach the Final Four since 1986, when Louisiana State got there as a No. 11.The Providence-Chattanooga game was the first meeting in tournament history between a No. 10 seed and a No. 14, as the Mocs were only the second No. 14 to get this far.Before last week, the Friars, the lone Big East school in the Sweet 16, had gone 10 years between wins in the NCAA tournament, but they've been impressive in wins over Marquette, Duke and Chattanooga.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1997
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- This one was all about the "R" word. Respect.Or lack thereof for a school from a smaller conference that was considered an appendage of the University of Tennessee.The team wants to be known as simply Chattanooga, not Tennessee-Chattanooga, with the nickname Mocs, referring to the mockingbird, the state bird. No more Moccasins. And no more Chief Mocanooga on the logo.After yesterday's outing in the NCAA Southeast Regional, their identity problem has been eased.The 14th-seeded Mocs thought Illinois was taking a little too much for granted during a pre-game celebration and vented their anger on the court with a 75-63 victory that propelled them into the Sweet 16 for the first time.
TRAVEL
By TOM UHLENBROCK and TOM UHLENBROCK,ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH | November 20, 2005
The girls were in softball jerseys, and their families were everywhere. They lined up at the doors of the Tennessee Aquarium in Chattanooga and filled the Southern Belle riverboat for an evening cruise. They beat the heat by running through the spray of a river park fountain and startled the other tourists in Ruby Falls cave by using its acoustics to amplify their battle cry: "Who are we? Crushers! Who are we? Crushers! Who are we? Crushers!" The National Softball Association chose Chattanooga for a fast-pitch-division World Series this summer -- yet another indication that the city has raised itself from a smoldering mess to one of the New South's top family vacation destinations.
SPORTS
December 2, 2004
Auto racing 3 p.m.Ford 400 (T)SPEED Men's college basketball 8 p.m.UT-Chattanooga at Virginia TechCSN 9:30 p.m.Nebraska at UABESPN2 1:30 a.m.UT-Chattanooga at Virginia TechCSN Women's college basketball 7:30 p.m.Duke at TennesseeESPN2 Pro basketball 8 p.m.Houston at DallasTNT 10:30 p.m.Cleveland at DenverTNT College football 7:30 p.m.Miami (Ohio) vs. ToledoESPN 3 a.m.Miami (Ohio) vs. Toledo (T)ESPN
SPORTS
July 17, 1992
CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. -- Dan Halldorson birdied three of the last four holes to finish with a 9-under-par 63 for the first-round lead.Halldorson, whose best finish this year is a tie for 10th at the St. Jude Classic, played the front nine in 5-under. He did not have a bogey and leads John Huston and Mitch Adcock by two strokes.Halldorson birdied No. 15 with a 15-foot putt, No. 16 with a 45-footer and the par-5 18th from four feet."At 16 I was just trying to get the ball close," Halldorson said.
NEWS
By Neal R. Peirce | June 22, 1998
CAN REGIONS collaborate to devise better futures than congestion plagued roads and uncontrolled sprawl?The communities of "Chatlanta," the fast-developing 115-mile corridor along Interstate 75 from Atlanta, Ga., to Chattanooga, Tenn., believe so.Instead of waiting for the asphalt-minded Georgia and Tennessee transportation departments to come up with their familiar roads-and-more-roads formula, the Chattanooga and Atlanta regions are agitating for an intriguing 21st century alternative.Bullet trainsTheir idea: Bullet trains serving not just the city centers and the fast-urbanizing growth corridor, but their airports, too. The underutilized Chattanooga airport, for example, could become a reliever for Atlanta's traffic-drowned Hartsfield International.
NEWS
June 12, 2013
Baltimore Democrat Rep. Elijah Cummings says the investigation of the IRS has been concluded ("Cummings calls for end to IRS probe," June 9). Yet only last week Congressman Cummings was outraged because the people on his street were struggling while money was being wasted by the IRS. He sounded like he wanted to learn who was responsible. This week he has decided his people in Baltimore don't need to know who was responsible. Did someone tell him to back off? This is typical Washington politics.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2011
Tiger sharks glided swift and smooth, moray eels darted into submerged caves and, in a full-blown rain forest re-created indoors, leafy and humid, tropical birds flitted past tamarin monkeys. John Racanelli, on his first visit to Baltimore's National Aquarium, was nothing short of astounded. Aquariums, he had thought, were dark, dank and strange. This ecological theater was anything but. Racanelli wasn't just a suit on a business trip. Like many representing other cities that hoped an aquarium might do for their town what this one did for Baltimore, he considered himself a pilgrim.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 10, 2007
CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. -- Summer is settling onto Missionary Ridge, which overlooks this southeast Tennessee city. Swallows glide on the warm breeze rustling the hackberry trees, kudzu vines sprout along the hillside, and the goats are back at work. Chattanooga's goats have become unofficial city mascots since the Public Works Department decided last year to let them roam a city-owned section of the ridge to nibble on the kudzu, the fast-growing vine that throttles many a Southern landscape.
SPORTS
By Special to The Sun | November 25, 2006
LAS VEGAS -- There were 24 lead changes and 10 ties before Gary Neal's driving layup with 7.9 seconds left in the game decided the final as Towson edged Tennessee-Chattanooga, 56-55, in third-round play of the Las Vegas Invitational yesterday at the Orleans Arena. The victory ended a two-game losing streak for the Tigers, who improved to 3-2. The largest lead in the game was five points, once in the first half by Towson at 12-7 and once by the Mocs (2-3) at 48-43 in the second half. The Mocs managed a 30-28 halftime lead to set up a back-and-forth second half.
NEWS
January 13, 2006
GEORGE R. SCOGGINS, JR., 82, passed away at his home on January 10, 2006 in Chattanooga, TN. Born in Baltimore MD, George spent the first 69 years ofhis life in Dundalk. He retired from Bethlehem Steel after 37 years of service. A WWII veteran, he loved telling stories of his past and we loved listening. He loved boats and operated his own marina for many years. He was a devoted husband to his wife, Kathy of Chattanooga. He was a loving father to his sons, Bruce and Ricky of Baltimore, his daughters, Georgia Sheeley of Baltimore and Peggy Geho of Rockledge, FL. We will miss him dearly.
TRAVEL
By TOM UHLENBROCK and TOM UHLENBROCK,ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH | November 20, 2005
The girls were in softball jerseys, and their families were everywhere. They lined up at the doors of the Tennessee Aquarium in Chattanooga and filled the Southern Belle riverboat for an evening cruise. They beat the heat by running through the spray of a river park fountain and startled the other tourists in Ruby Falls cave by using its acoustics to amplify their battle cry: "Who are we? Crushers! Who are we? Crushers! Who are we? Crushers!" The National Softball Association chose Chattanooga for a fast-pitch-division World Series this summer -- yet another indication that the city has raised itself from a smoldering mess to one of the New South's top family vacation destinations.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,Sun Staff Writer | February 22, 1994
The stage has been set for a U.S. Interregional Soccer League indoor championship showdown Sunday between the unbeaten Baltimore Bays and unbeaten Atlanta Magic.All top-seeded Baltimore (12-0) and second-seeded Atlanta (14-0) have to do is win two preliminary-round games to make it to Sunday's final at 3 p.m. at Du Burns Arena.Baltimore and Atlanta do not meet in the preliminary rounds Friday and Saturday. Baltimore got the top seed on goal differential, outscoring its opponents 176-42, compared to Atlanta's 94-31 margin.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,Sun Staff Writer | February 27, 1994
Mark Mettrick played like a man possessed yesterday, scoring eight goals to lead the Baltimore Bays to a 15-10 victory over the Tulsa Roughnecks.But it wasn't enough to get the Bays into today's U.S. Interregional Soccer League championship game at Du Burns Arena.The Bays also needed the Chattanooga Express to upset the streaking Atlanta Magic in the second game last night. That didn't come close to happening.Atlanta won its 35th straight USISL game with an 11-3 romp over the Express, leaving the Bays to play in today's 2 p.m. consolation game against Tulsa.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | November 13, 2005
I know how you feel. Sometimes it's hard to swallow the sports news. Just last week ... A Philadelphia Phillies pitcher was jailed, accused of attacking five men with machetes and pouring gas on them in an attempt to light them on fire. And that same day, six Chattanooga (Tenn.) football players were charged with raping a female student. Also last week, we learned that Terrell Owens doesn't play well with others, and the University of Virginia suspended four football players for undisclosed reasons.
SPORTS
March 29, 2005
Philadelphia Regional Semifinals At Philadelphia Sunday Tennessee 75, Texas Tech 59 Rutgers 64, Ohio State 58 Championship Today Tennessee (29-4) vs. Rutgers (28-6), 9 p.m. Chattanooga Regional Semifinals At Chattanooga, Tenn. Saturday LSU 90, Liberty 48 Duke 63, Georgia 57 Championship Yesterday LSU 59, Duke 49 Kansas City Regional Semifinals At Kansas City, Mo. Sunday Michigan State 76, Vanderbilt 64 Stanford 76, Connecticut 59 Championship Today Michigan State (31-3) vs. Stanford (32-2)
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