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By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Shirley S. Chater's future as Social Security commissioner ran into a potentially serious roadblock yesterday as the chairman of the Senate Finance Committee blistered her for a lack of leadership and said he would hold up her nomination to a six-year term.Frustrated by Ms. Chater's refusal at her confirmation hearing to offer a prescription for preventing the Social Security system from going broke, Sen. Bob Packwood told Ms. Chater: "You're just ducking it. You don't want to answer these questions.
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NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Staff researcher Robert Gee contributed to this article | April 1, 1997
WASHINGTON -- White House aides say President Clinton has settled on a new Social Security commissioner, a rumpled liberal known for his easy manner, strong organizational skills and detailed knowledge of the federal budget.The choice to replace Shirley S. Chater is Kenneth S. Apfel, 48, a former aide to former Sen. Bill Bradley of New Jersey. Apfel began with the Clinton administration as an assistant secretary at the Department of Health and Human Services. He is now associate director for human resources at the White House Office of Management and Budget.
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NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | September 16, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The long-delayed nomination of Shirley Sears Chater to head the Social Security Administration, which has been without a permanent director for nearly a year, could come as early as today, according to a spokesman for the Department of Health and Human Services."
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writer John B. O'Donnell contributed to this article | November 12, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Citing a desire to spend more time with her children and grandchildren, Shirley S. Chater has announced that she is stepping down as Social Security commissioner after a rocky 3 1/2 years overseeing the nation's largest pension and disability programs."
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 10, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Nearly three months after he publicly blistered Social Security Commissioner Shirley S. Chater for an alleged lack of leadership, Senate Finance Committee Chairman Bob Packwood said yesterday that her nomination to a six-year term is "on the back-burner."The Oregon Republican was saying, in effect, that he has no plans to bring the nomination to a vote in his committee anytime soon, if ever, a decision that leaves Ms. Chater in an unusual and uncomfortable position.She will continue to head the 65,000-worker agency, headquartered in Woodlawn, that sends pension and disability checks to 50 million Americans each month and collects payroll taxes from another 135 million people and their employers.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 16, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Shirley S. Chater will be renominated as Social Security commissioner, President Clinton said yesterday, 13 months after she took over the troubled Woodlawn agency.Mr. Clinton said he would appoint Ms. Chater to a six-year term under a law he signed in August that makes Social Security an independent agency, separate from the Department of Health and Human Services.With 65,000 employees, including 14,200 in the Baltimore area, Social Security collects payroll taxes for 135 million Americans and pays disability and retirement benefits to another 46 million.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writer John B. O'Donnell contributed to this article | November 12, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Citing a desire to spend more time with her children and grandchildren, Shirley S. Chater has announced that she is stepping down as Social Security commissioner after a rocky 3 1/2 years overseeing the nation's largest pension and disability programs."
NEWS
By John M. Biers and John M. Biers,STATES NEWS SERVICE | June 28, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Officials of the Social Security Administration stoutly defended the agency yesterday against criticism that more and more taxpayer money is being used to pay salaries of employees whose work time is devoted to union activity.House Republicans have cited a report by the General Accounting Office showing that the annual government cost of union activities at the Woodlawn-based SSA more than doubled since 1993, to $12.6 million last year.Critics say that at a time when many Americans are fearful that Social Security will eventually run out of money, the agency should hardly be spending more money on union activity.
NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | September 10, 1993
WASHINGTON -- More than a month after the White House announced it had selected Shirley Sears Chater to head the Woodlawn-based Social Security Administration, Senate Finance Committee Chairman Daniel Patrick Moynihan is demanding to know why her nomination has not been submitted to Congress."
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In a stinging rebuke that further sours the Social Security Administration's relations with Congress, the chairman of a key House subcommittee has demanded that the agency's commissioner, Shirley S. Chater, resign."
NEWS
By John M. Biers and John M. Biers,STATES NEWS SERVICE | June 28, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Officials of the Social Security Administration stoutly defended the agency yesterday against criticism that more and more taxpayer money is being used to pay salaries of employees whose work time is devoted to union activity.House Republicans have cited a report by the General Accounting Office showing that the annual government cost of union activities at the Woodlawn-based SSA more than doubled since 1993, to $12.6 million last year.Critics say that at a time when many Americans are fearful that Social Security will eventually run out of money, the agency should hardly be spending more money on union activity.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In a stinging rebuke that further sours the Social Security Administration's relations with Congress, the chairman of a key House subcommittee has demanded that the agency's commissioner, Shirley S. Chater, resign."
NEWS
By Sarah Lindenfeld and Sarah Lindenfeld,Contributing Writer | August 12, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Fade to the story of Michael M. Maybin. Working hard to build a life for his family in Baltimore, he saw its happiness shattered when his wife died while giving birth. But since her death in January, Mr. Maybin's life has improved -- thanks to Social Security.His reassuring saga is featured in a new series of ads whose message is that the Social Security program, notwithstanding its critics, is fine, and benefits all Americans, not just the elderly. With Hillary Rodham Clinton at her side, Commissioner Shirley S. Chater yesterday launched a campaign to bolster trust in the Social Security program, which will turn 60 Monday.
NEWS
By Jean Haley | May 11, 1995
SHE WORE A shiny black ribbon on the lapel of her red suit jacket, the only visible sign that Social Security Administration Commissioner Shirley Chater had recently left tragedy in Oklahoma City.But when she talked, her immersion in the heartache was obvious.Ms. Chater spoke at the White House Conference on Aging last week. She had spent nearly a week in Oklahoma City after the Murrah Federal Building was bombed. Miraculously, 38 of the 53 employees in that Social Security office escaped.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 10, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Nearly three months after he publicly blistered Social Security Commissioner Shirley S. Chater for an alleged lack of leadership, Senate Finance Committee Chairman Bob Packwood said yesterday that her nomination to a six-year term is "on the back-burner."The Oregon Republican was saying, in effect, that he has no plans to bring the nomination to a vote in his committee anytime soon, if ever, a decision that leaves Ms. Chater in an unusual and uncomfortable position.She will continue to head the 65,000-worker agency, headquartered in Woodlawn, that sends pension and disability checks to 50 million Americans each month and collects payroll taxes from another 135 million people and their employers.
NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | April 28, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Her voice breaking at times, Social Security Commissioner Shirley S. Chater yesterday praised the 16 SSA employees believed killed in the Oklahoma City bombing, saying they left behind "a legacy of dignity, of strength and of being there for others."Ms. Chater, who returned to Baltimore from Oklahoma City Wednesday night, also praised the dozens of Social Security workers from Texas and elsewhere who immediately headed to Oklahoma to help with the workload there in the wake of the bombing.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Staff Writer | October 19, 1993
Shirley Sears Chater, described by her new boss as a woman of skill, vision and tenacity, took the oath of office yesterday as commissioner of the Social Security Administration at its Woodlawn headquarters.The 60-year-old educator will oversee a work force of more than 68,000, including more than 14,000 in the Baltimore area."If only Shirley Chater can do for America what she did for Texas Women's University," Donna E. Shalala, secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, said before swearing in the new SSA chief.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | July 18, 1993
DENTON, Texas -- This North-Texas city of 69,000 is having a love affair with Dr. Shirley Sears Chater and, if the truth be told, it will be heartbroken if she runs off to join the Clinton administration.Dr. Chater, 60, president of the Texas Woman's University (TWU) here since 1986, is the administration's likely nominee to head the vast Social Security Administration in the Baltimore suburb of Woodlawn."Denton is not big enough to keep her here," lamented Jeane Morrison, 54, wife and aide to Ed Morrison, 72, the chairman of the family-owned grain mill, Morrison Milling.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Shirley S. Chater's future as Social Security commissioner ran into a potentially serious roadblock yesterday as the chairman of the Senate Finance Committee blistered her for a lack of leadership and said he would hold up her nomination to a six-year term.Frustrated by Ms. Chater's refusal at her confirmation hearing to offer a prescription for preventing the Social Security system from going broke, Sen. Bob Packwood told Ms. Chater: "You're just ducking it. You don't want to answer these questions.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 16, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Shirley S. Chater will be renominated as Social Security commissioner, President Clinton said yesterday, 13 months after she took over the troubled Woodlawn agency.Mr. Clinton said he would appoint Ms. Chater to a six-year term under a law he signed in August that makes Social Security an independent agency, separate from the Department of Health and Human Services.With 65,000 employees, including 14,200 in the Baltimore area, Social Security collects payroll taxes for 135 million Americans and pays disability and retirement benefits to another 46 million.
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