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ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case | October 23, 2013
Early last month, Canton lost a charming bar called Adam's Eve Gastropub. It was not transcendent or life-altering, nor did it aim to be. Instead, Adam's Eve provided comfort food and craft beers for locals needing a break from the well-worn establishments of O'Donnell Square. So when the announcement came that Adam's Eve would become The Chasseur (pronounced SHA-sur), I hoped it would operate in a similar manner: without pretentions. On a recent Saturday afternoon visit, The Chasseur retained Adam's Eve's low-key atmosphere and emphasis on a quality bar program.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | November 12, 2013
I'm a sucker for Baltimore-themed cocktails. I'm compelled to order them, in fact, no matter how unusual, random or potentially deadly they may turn out to be. So obviously, when I spotted Boyle's Baltimore Water on the menu at the Chasseur in Canton, I had to give it a go. And? Well, who knew a drink lovingly named after the infamy of our Mobtown tap water could taste so delicious? Bar manager Michael Zabora takes a rather cheeky approach to paying homage to our fair city. "I started making the drink a few years ago, when [Pinnacle Red Berry vodka]
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | November 12, 2013
I'm a sucker for Baltimore-themed cocktails. I'm compelled to order them, in fact, no matter how unusual, random or potentially deadly they may turn out to be. So obviously, when I spotted Boyle's Baltimore Water on the menu at the Chasseur in Canton, I had to give it a go. And? Well, who knew a drink lovingly named after the infamy of our Mobtown tap water could taste so delicious? Bar manager Michael Zabora takes a rather cheeky approach to paying homage to our fair city. "I started making the drink a few years ago, when [Pinnacle Red Berry vodka]
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case | October 23, 2013
Early last month, Canton lost a charming bar called Adam's Eve Gastropub. It was not transcendent or life-altering, nor did it aim to be. Instead, Adam's Eve provided comfort food and craft beers for locals needing a break from the well-worn establishments of O'Donnell Square. So when the announcement came that Adam's Eve would become The Chasseur (pronounced SHA-sur), I hoped it would operate in a similar manner: without pretentions. On a recent Saturday afternoon visit, The Chasseur retained Adam's Eve's low-key atmosphere and emphasis on a quality bar program.
NEWS
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2013
The Chasseur is a likable enough tavern. Think of it as the kind of place where you can sit down for a good square meal of well-prepared comfort food and then, if you're feeling perky, spend some time at the adjacent bar with your friends and neighbors. There's potential for The Chasseur to be more than just likable. Given time and effort, The Chasseur could develop into something even better — a winning tavern. Here we're talking about a place you'd work into your schedule, maybe spread the word about, or, if it's really special, keep it to yourself.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | November 28, 1998
ABOARD THE PRIDE OF BALTIMORE II -- "Let's shoot all four of them!" called Capt. Jan Miles, to the ship's eager gunner, John Paul Hope, who scurried into place."
FEATURES
By Janice Baker | February 24, 1991
What was most Hawaiian about Leilani's of Hawaii was Leilani Wallace, whose hearty, raucous cackle infused vitality and warmth into the dining rooms and the bar of this pretty, antique eating place. We liked her spirit. When she brought our entrees to the table, giggling coquettishly she apologized for not serving like a pro. "One of my waitresses called in to say her uncle died," she said. "I asked her if it was the same uncle who died last month in North Carolina. Oh no, she said, this uncle died in Virginia."
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2011
A seven-foot-long replica of the Pride of Baltimore II will go on permanent display Thursday at the Baltimore Visitor Center on Light Street. The scale model was commissioned by the nonprofit Pride of Baltimore Inc. and was built by volunteers from the Society for the Preservation of Federal Hill and Fells Point. It is designed to teach residents and visitors about the sailing vessel, which itself is a reproduction of a circa-1812 Baltimore Clipper topsail schooner, or "privateer," called the Chasseur.
FEATURES
By Henry Scarupa | October 23, 1990
Sails billowing in the wind, the Pride of Baltimore plows through running seas, carrying the city's name to a far corner of the globe. That dramatic image dominates the cover of "Sailing With Pride," a book of color photos of both the original Pride and Pride II by Baltimore photographer Greg Pease.The $49.95 book of 151 pictures is being released today on the second anniversary of the commissioning of the second Pride. The author will donate $1 per book from the sale of the first 5,000 copies to Pride of Baltimore Inc."
HEALTH
October 1, 2014
Think Pink Zumba Charity Event Zumba party to raise funds for two charities in Maryland assisting women battling with breast cancer : the Red Devils and Sisters Network Inc. Noon-2 p.m. Saturday at Downtown Cultural Arts Center, 401 N. Howard St., Baltimore. $10. the-red-devils.org Sweating for the Sisters Bokwa workout benefits the Tyanna Foundation. 9:30 am. Saturdays in October at Hard Rock Cafe Baltimore outdoor pier, 601 E. Pratt St. $10. tyanna.org/baltimore/events Equine Wine Festival Wine tasting and purchase, music, a food court, an outdoor horse arena with demonstrations, pony rides, horse-drawn wagon rides, artisans and more.
NEWS
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2013
The Chasseur is a likable enough tavern. Think of it as the kind of place where you can sit down for a good square meal of well-prepared comfort food and then, if you're feeling perky, spend some time at the adjacent bar with your friends and neighbors. There's potential for The Chasseur to be more than just likable. Given time and effort, The Chasseur could develop into something even better — a winning tavern. Here we're talking about a place you'd work into your schedule, maybe spread the word about, or, if it's really special, keep it to yourself.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | November 28, 1998
ABOARD THE PRIDE OF BALTIMORE II -- "Let's shoot all four of them!" called Capt. Jan Miles, to the ship's eager gunner, John Paul Hope, who scurried into place."
FEATURES
By Janice Baker | February 24, 1991
What was most Hawaiian about Leilani's of Hawaii was Leilani Wallace, whose hearty, raucous cackle infused vitality and warmth into the dining rooms and the bar of this pretty, antique eating place. We liked her spirit. When she brought our entrees to the table, giggling coquettishly she apologized for not serving like a pro. "One of my waitresses called in to say her uncle died," she said. "I asked her if it was the same uncle who died last month in North Carolina. Oh no, she said, this uncle died in Virginia."
NEWS
By ERNEST F. IMHOFF and ERNEST F. IMHOFF,SUN STAFF | December 5, 1997
For second mate Amy Strange's first voyage on The Pride of Baltimore II, the exciting part will be setting foot in China.Deckhand Jennifer Muther, on her third Pride trip, awaits those evenings when the boat cruises under a full moon and a heaven full of stars: "It's something completely magical."Captain Jan Miles has a veteran sailor's "concerned eye" about the threat of Pacific typhoons on what will be the Pride's first voyage to Asia and its farthest in mileage.He and his crew of 11 are preparing to leave the Inner Harbor at 4 p.m. tomorrow.
FEATURES
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 21, 2003
William Fell, the English colonist who gave his name to the Fells Point waterfront, was no admiral, not even a captain, perhaps not much of a seaman at all. "I don't think they themselves -[the Fells] - were masters of any vessels," says Lesley Humphreys, the exhibit coordinator at the new Fells Point Maritime Museum that opens today on Thames Street. "They built the ships, but I don't think they sailed them." Even how many ships they built is problematic, says Geoffrey Footner, a maritime historian who lives on Fell Street.
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