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NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | November 22, 2013
Roland Park Country School has received permission from the Baltimore City Public Schools to open a public charter school for middle school girls in 2015. Roland Park Country, a girls school, is believed to be the first private school in the nation to win approval for a public charter school, although several schools in Hawaii are trying, Roland Park Country School spokeswoman Nancy Mugele said. The charter school, to be named for Lillie May Carroll Jackson, a civil rights pioneer and early leader of the NAACP in Baltimore, is scheduled to open in fall 2015.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
After five years of below-average performance, Baltimore County's only charter school will lose its license to operate in July, but will continue as a regular public school next year. The Baltimore County school board voted Tuesday night to pull the charter from Imagine Discovery Public Charter School, the Woodlawn-area school that families had fought for years to keep open. Imagine Discovery parents are generally satisfied with the transfer of leadership because they believe the school will remain open with the same principal and teachers, said Charles Sydnor, who is on the school's PTA leadership team.
NEWS
By David Driver, For The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
Josh Pratt hadn't met Tim Stedman until this year, but the two men who share similar athletic and educational backgrounds quickly found they have common ground in other areas as well. They are about the same age and both have young children, and they discovered they lived just a few minutes from each other in Crofton. These days, Pratt takes his young son to watch youth football games in which Stedman's son plays. "It's a small world," says Pratt, 42. "We hit it off. " But those particular mutual interests aren't what brought Stedman, 41, the athletic director at Chesapeake Science Point Public Charter School in Hanover, and Pratt together.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
The Baltimore school board will no longer back loans for charter school facilities, a move that the city's coalition of charter operators calls "short-sighted" and said could deter those looking to open the in-demand schools. The district has served as guarantor for three charter schools, City Neighbors, Baltimore Leadership School for Young Women and the Baltimore Design School, to either purchase or conduct large renovations of their facilities. But board members said now that they have the $1 billion task of rebuilding and renovating the school district's infrastructure ahead of them — a process that is financed by debt — the district cannot risk more capital improvement bills.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
Less than a week after the Baltimore-based Children's Guild started construction on a new school in Anne Arundel County scheduled to open in August, the nonprofit received formal approval from the county Board of Education to move forward with plans for yet another school that could open in two years. At its Wednesday meeting, the board approved a contract for the Monarch Academy Public Charter School, Central Campus, at a site to be determined. The school board had voted in July to build the new charter school.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | October 8, 2013
With frustration building over Washington's refusal to behave in the public interest, perhaps it's worth noting a drastic solution tried by the Irish. Last Friday, Irish voters cast ballots on a referendum to abolish the country's Upper House, known as the Seanad. Prime Minister Enda Kenny said Ireland didn't need all of its politicians and they should be made to suffer along with everyone else as the country continues to struggle economically. The measure to abolish the Seanad lost by just 42,500 votes out of more than 1,226,000 cast (51.8 percent to 48.2 percent)
NEWS
August 26, 2013
As Baltimore school board officials search for a new city schools CEO, they might do well to note the big gains in student achievement at schools in the District of Columbia where educators have made a longer school day part of the reform effort. It's worked well enough in Washington that Baltimore might well benefit from emulating that city's success. More instructional time in the classroom appears to have helped D.C. children not only boost their performance on standardized tests but do so more rapidly than their peers at schools with traditional 7.5-hour schedules.
FEATURES
By Nicole Sakin, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2013
Sammi Nelson-Saunders stood in a crowd of blue and purple shirts, dirt on her hands and a smile on her face. Behind her, music was blasting and flowers were being planted as more than 300 volunteers built a new playground for students at KIPP Baltimore. The rising third-grader at KIPP, a Knowledge is Power Program charter school in Northwest Baltimore, had been used to playing on an empty field adjacent to the school. "I was very excited because we never had a playground, and now we have a playground to play on," Nelson-Saunders said.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2013
The Baltimore City school board approved three new charter schools to open beginning in 2014, including two schools that will be subject to heightened scrutiny throughout their contracts. The Lillie May Carroll Jackson School, which will be operated by a nonprofit organization created by Roland Park Country School and educate girls in grades 5-8, won a smooth approval to open in 2014. But the Green Street Academy, which has been operating as a "transformation" school with an environmental theme for the past three years, "stretched certain standards," city schools CEO Andrés Alonso said in recommending to grant the school charter status.
NEWS
May 24, 2013
As a teacher, I totally agree with Morna McDermott's assessments of city school CEO Andrés Alonso's performance ("The fallacy of reform," May 18) over the past six years. She speaks the truth. Mr. Alonso has proven to be a fine salesman. Surely, the school board, mayor and state think so. They have practically given him carte blanche. But where are the "goods" in terms of student performance (passing test scores, learning outcomes)? None. Goes to prove that "everything new and shiny isn't always best.
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