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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2013
The Baltimore City school board approved three new charter schools to open beginning in 2014, including two schools that will be subject to heightened scrutiny throughout their contracts. The Lillie May Carroll Jackson School, which will be operated by a nonprofit organization created by Roland Park Country School and educate girls in grades 5-8, won a smooth approval to open in 2014. But the Green Street Academy, which has been operating as a "transformation" school with an environmental theme for the past three years, "stretched certain standards," city schools CEO Andrés Alonso said in recommending to grant the school charter status.
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NEWS
May 24, 2013
As a teacher, I totally agree with Morna McDermott's assessments of city school CEO Andrés Alonso's performance ("The fallacy of reform," May 18) over the past six years. She speaks the truth. Mr. Alonso has proven to be a fine salesman. Surely, the school board, mayor and state think so. They have practically given him carte blanche. But where are the "goods" in terms of student performance (passing test scores, learning outcomes)? None. Goes to prove that "everything new and shiny isn't always best.
NEWS
May 22, 2013
Saturday's "your turn" pieces on education reform ("The fallacy of reform" and "Diversity, choice key for schools," May 18) did not seem to address Baltimore City schools' educational history nor requirements in a practical, yet considerate way. Schools CEO Andrés Alonso cut the staff at headquarters, then used the space to benefit at-risk students. He built consensus to achieve improved attendance, test scores, and graduation rates. Additionally, why do some live in the past and complain schools are crumbling?
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
The Baltimore school board unanimously passed a $1.2 billion budget Monday that essentially remained intact since it was presented. The last budget of outgoing schools CEO Andrés Alonso includes cuts to per-pupil funding and high schools but retains spending power for principals and adds academic programs. The $793 million that would go to schools represents a 36 percent increase since 2008, when Alonso implemented the "Fair Student Funding" structure — which funds schools based on enrollment and gives principals autonomy over their budgets and hiring.
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2013
Unimpressed with the elementary school in her Baltimore neighborhood, Bobbi Macdonald set out to create her own. She founded the City Neighborhoods Foundation in 2003, the year her oldest daughter started kindergarten and the state of Maryland began allowing charter schools. Ten years later, the nonprofit is running three schools: City Neighbors Charter School, City Neighbors Hamilton and City Neighbors High School. All are known for student engagement and attendance rates that top 90 percent.
NEWS
May 17, 2013
In their commentary ("Six steps for post-Alonso school reform," May 14), Thomas Wilcox, Diane Bell-McKoy and Laura Gamble use many lofty and idealistic sounding words to promote their vision. However, it bears noting that education "reformers" are well-versed in using terms that have an appeal, yet bear little substance. It's part of the script to sell the public on a model for education that actually requires a deeper analysis and understanding. Words like "choice" and "accountability" have done for the corporate-model of education reform what buzz words like "whole grain" and "real fruit juice" have done for the food processing industry.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
The city school board is considering proposals for seven charter schools that include two named for female trailblazers, another attempt at an all-male, college-preparatory program in East Baltimore, and an elementary school for at-risk youths. The new programs were presented to the Baltimore school board Tuesday as part of the district's annual charter application process. The applicants, the majority of which want to open in 2014, had made it through at least one round of interviews with a district charter advisory board.
NEWS
By Gwendolyn Glenn | April 30, 2013
Laurel Boys and Girls Club officials have not only decided to put off plans to open a charter high school in their Montgomery Street headquarters indefinitely, but they will not renew the lease of its current tenant, Princeton Day Academy, for next year. According to club president Levet Brown, the charter school is being delayed because club officials have not been able to raise the money needed to bring the building up to code in order to house a school in the facility. Brown said Princeton Day, a private high school with about 40 students, was using space in the annex portion of the building free of charge.
NEWS
March 5, 2013
I recently had the privilege of speaking to an enthusiastic and hopeful crowd gathered in Annapolis to urge lawmakers to pass a bill allowing the state of Maryland to renovate or rebuild Baltimore City's school buildings over the next 10 years through an innovative financing arrangement ("Thousands rally for city schools construction plan," Feb. 26). We are not asking for additional funds but a simply a long-term commitment of funds already allocated by the state so that the city's school buildings can be brought on a par with those in the counties and with charter schools.
EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | March 5, 2013
Hoping to open Carroll County's first Montessori public charter school by the fall of 2014, a group of parents is now working on an application to submit to the county by April 1. Sustainable Futures hosted a public meeting at South Carroll High School on Feb. 25 to discuss its proposal for a tuition-free public school for county children in grades 1-5. The group had submitted a letter of intent to Carroll County Public Schools in December and,...
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