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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 21, 1996
The men who revived the idea of charter government in Carroll County have decided to leave the rest of the work to the League of Women Voters.The county's eight mayors renewed the charter movement when they unanimously asked the County Commissioners last month to appoint a charter committee. The commissioners declined the request, 2-1, saying a petition drive would more accurately reflect public sentiment for charter.Signatures from 5 percent of the 71,000 registered voters would keep the charter issue alive, but the work involved probably ends any possibility that voters would see the issue on the November ballot.
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NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2005
Three charter school operators asked the Maryland Board of Education yesterday to resolve disagreements with Baltimore and Prince George's County school officials over how much autonomy and public money the independently run schools should receive. Arguing that the school systems are undermining the independent nature of public charter schools by giving them too little funding, lawyers for the charters asked the state board to determine how much money the schools are entitled to. "This is a statewide issue that requires a statewide answer," said Will DuBois, an attorney for City Neighbors Charter School in Northeast Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1996
Carroll County's eight mayors have asked the Board of County Commissioners to appoint a charter government committee, and they want an answer by Friday.The municipal leaders say charter government would mean an elected executive and county council, more autonomy and less reliance on the state legislative delegation."It was unanimous that we ask the County Commissioners to appoint a charter government committee," the mayors wrote in a letter sent to the commissioners Thursday."There has always been a groundswell for charter government; it's always in the background," said Mount Airy Mayor Gerald R. Johnson.
NEWS
By Matthew Mosk and Matthew Mosk,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1999
Just when Annapolis officials thought they had quelled the storm over a charter vessel that sought a long-term slip at the City Dock, new clouds are looming.This time, the tempest is not over longtime watermen losing their moorings. It's over the notion that an upstart charter company will get prime-time harbor placement that might have been denied to others."We have for years had people with charter vessels asking to rent slips from the city, and for years they've been turned down," said Alderman Louise Hammond.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 14, 1997
The Carroll County Citizens for Charter Government will collect signatures at several locations this weekend.Volunteers are looking for about 700 more signers to reach their goal of 4,000.A successful petition drive would force the County Commissioners to appoint a board that would write a charter. The charter issue could appear on the ballot as early as November 1998. If voters approved charter, the county government would change from three commissioners to a county executive and council.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1996
Carroll County's eight mayors have asked the Board of County Commissioners to appoint a charter government committee, and they want an answer by Friday.The municipal leaders say charter government would mean an elected executive and county council, more autonomy and less reliance on the state legislative delegation."It was unanimous that we ask the County Commissioners to appoint a charter government committee," the mayors wrote in a letter sent to the commissioners Thursday."There has always been a groundswell for charter government; it's always in the background," said Mount Airy Mayor Gerald R. Johnson.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1996
The Board of County Commissioners, deflecting pressure from Carroll's mayors, will not appoint a committee to draft charter government unless voters petition them.The commissioners voted 2-1 during a closed meeting Thursday to reject a request from the county's eight mayors to form a charter committee. That request came in a letter dated May 16; the mayors asked the commissioners to reply within eight days."When you have eight mayors from every corner of the county unanimously asking you to take a look at charter, why not look at it?"
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1998
Carroll's charter government initiative appears to have been as unattractive to people's wallets as it was to voters in the May 1 election.According to reports filed with the election board Tuesday, Carroll County Citizens for Charter Government, which favored a switch to a county executive and council, raised $2,469, including a $500 gift from the North Carroll Democratic club.The anti-charter group, Citizens Against Big Charter Government, raised nearly twice as much -- $4,733. But more than half of that amount came from two contributors.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1996
Charter government is gaining support in Carroll County, but advocates remain a long way from obtaining the nearly 3,700 signatures needed to create a charter-writing committee.After meetings in Mount Airy and Westminster this week, 30 residents signed petitions, bringing the total to about 200 -- far from the number needed."I have favored charter for some time as a more orderly way to make decisions," said Frances C. Nyce of Westminster, a recent signer. "It is important to have a written way to conduct county business."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | September 3, 1997
After five public hearings, the Carroll County Charter Board returns to writing the document that could change the county's form of government from three commissioners to an executive and council.The nine-member board reconvenes at 7 p.m. Sept. 11 at the Ag Center in Westminster to review issues -- some controversial -- that arose during the hearings. Most notably, they must decide whether the document should include a tax cap and provide for an elected or an appointed executive.The board also will determine whether a special election is needed.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1998
Carroll's charter government initiative appears to have been as unattractive to people's wallets as it was to voters in the May 1 election.According to reports filed with the election board Tuesday, Carroll County Citizens for Charter Government, which favored a switch to a county executive and council, raised $2,469, including a $500 gift from the North Carroll Democratic club.The anti-charter group, Citizens Against Big Charter Government, raised nearly twice as much -- $4,733. But more than half of that amount came from two contributors.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and James M. Coram and Mary Gail Hare and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1998
Carroll County chose tradition yesterday, voting nearly 2-to-1 in a special election to continue its current form of government, which has been in place since before the Civil War, instead of creating a system like that of other metropolitan counties in the region.Charter, which would have created a county executive and five-member County Council, failed, 11,107 to 7,227.It was the fourth time in three decades that Carroll residents have voted against such a proposal, and charter opponents say that the issue is likely dead for at least a decade.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1998
Three days before Carroll County voters go to the polls to decide whether to change their form of government, charter supporters and opponents yesterday brought their viewpoints to a statewide television audience.Both sides used the exposure to make final pleas to voters for support."People who have been here a long time are satisfied with the way things are. They are very much concerned that the people coming in want change," said former Carroll County Commissioner Julia W. Gouge, a member of Citizens Against Big Charter Government.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1998
When Winnie Bullock placed an ad in The Freedom Fighter, a South Carroll residents' publication, he thought it would generate appointments for cuts and shaves at his Eldersburg barbershop. Instead, it has sparked a flurry of angry calls to his business.What Bullock didn't realize when he paid $25 for the ad was that this issue of The Freedom Fighter, circulation 12,000, would be dedicated to the charter debate. And that all of the articles supported a change in the way this once-rural county's government is run. When charter opponents read it, the phone started ringing, and it hasn't stopped.
NEWS
March 1, 1998
Charter government would have hidden costs ...Several people have written letters to the editor extolling the virtues of charter government for Carroll County.It seems strange to me that these people moved to Carroll County because they loved Carroll County, yet now they want to change it. If they moved to Carroll because it was different from the locale they came from, why do you think they now want to change our government to the form of government they wanted to leave?I could care less, because I was elected as a commissioner by the largest vote for that office in 1994.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 19, 1998
Carroll County voters will choose how they want to be governed in a special election June 9.On the ballot will be a charter initiative that could change government from a system of three commissioners to an executive and county council. Also on the ballot will be a proposal to expand the number of commissioners to five.Voters will have a choice of yes or no on both issues. If both receive a majority of yes votes, charter takes precedence. If neither proposal receives a majority, the county will continue to be governed by three commissioners.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and James M. Coram and Mary Gail Hare and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1998
Carroll County chose tradition yesterday, voting overwhelmingly in a special election to continue its current form of government, which has been in place since before the Civil War, instead of creating a system like that of other metropolitan counties in the region.Charter, which would have created a county executive and five-member county council, failed, 11,107 to 7,227.It was the fourth time in three decades that Carroll residents voted against such a proposal, and charter opponents say that the issue is likely dead for at least a decade.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1998
Former county planning commission Vice Chairman Joseph H. Mettle, who cited health reasons and growing frustration at unchecked residential growth when he resigned 10 months ago, is hoping to accomplish on the Internet what he could not as a member of the development review panel.He wants to slow Carroll's growth and hold elected officials more accountable.With the help of slow-growth activist Gene Edwards, Mettle has developed a World Wide Web site he hopes will spur Carroll residents to choose a charter form of government, with a county executive and county council, instead of the current three-member Board of County Commissioners.
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