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NEWS
December 4, 2012
In 1985 I bought a small house in the Cedmont neighborhood in Northeast Baltimore. At the time, I knew nothing about Formstone ("Formstone would be banned on new buildings under proposal," Dec. 1). I have found it to be beautiful, especially up close when it includes subtle shades of pale pink, blue, and gray with sparkles. Several years ago, a storm damaged a small piece of Formstone. I had some difficulty finding a person who could repair it properly, and I am pleased the Formstone artist blended in the new with the old. Baltimore has many charms we can all enjoy, and I'm very pleased to live here and have a unique home.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
A local chain of running stores plans to host free, fundraising runs on Saturday to raise money for a pair of charities that benefit victims of last year's Boston Marathon bombing. Charm City Run -- with locations in Annapolis, Baltimore, Bel Air, Clarksville and Timonium -- will host the free runs at their stores starting at 9 a.m. Employees will take donations for the Erika Brannock Fund and the One Fund Boston. The chain will also match up to the first $5,000 in donations and donate 10 percent of sales on Saturday to the Brannock Fund, which benefits the Towson preschool teacher who was seriously injured at the marathon last year.
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NEWS
March 23, 2011
I read with interest your feature about Baltimore workers and former citizens moving to Pennsylvania ( "Md. transplants seen as helping to drive growth of York County, Pa.," March 22). I wish you would write about the city dwellers and home owners like me. We occasionally see stories about high-end rehab buyers in the Real Estate section, people who are living in neighborhoods like Patterson Park, Butchers Hill, Federal Hill and Canton. But what about the rest of us who bought in the 1990s?
FEATURES
By Jada Vanderpool, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
Following religious values taught as a youth can be difficult for many when entering adulthood, but Charm City Tribe, a two-year-old program in the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore, aspires to reconnect people in their 20s and 30s to Judaic practices they may have lost along the road to independence. Local families funded a three-year grant initiative to reach non-Orthodox young Jewish adults and generate positive attitudes toward Jewish culture. Director of the program Rabbi Jessy Gross organizes events to connect the community and works individually with young people to help them identify their stances on Judaism.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | July 18, 1995
WHEN IT comes to news reporting, the old city-room edict is always: first, get the story; and second, get it right. When the writer gets it wrong, it's a mess. It gets the reader who knows better all upset, confuses history and puts an error in the record books. I know; I've had my share of errors.Recently, the New York Times, which is known for its excellence, included what some of us around Baltimore consider a glaring error. On Sunday, July 9, the Times published an article about Baltimore in its travel section, called "What's Doing in Baltimore," by writer Melinda Henneberger.
NEWS
June 15, 2013
The problem in the city regarding trash is the city residents themselves ("A better bag tax," June 12). I drive the Fulton/Monroe corridor every day, and if there's a pile of trash accumulating on the street, every day it just gets larger. Car occupants dump their ashtray or will drop a McDonald's bag out the car window onto the street. What's lacking in a city is not a bag tax, its pride in your city. R.J. Stryjewski, Baltimore
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2013
Christina Spearman dug out her best high school formal gown, took the day off work and headed down to the Inner Harbor on Friday morning to realize the dream of a lifetime. She was getting an Oscar. OK, that's a stretch. What she was actually getting, thanks to an 11-city Oscar Roadtrip that stopped in Baltimore, was the chance to pose with an Oscar — to hold the 81/2-pound gold-plated statuette for a few seconds and have her picture snapped with it. But the degree of difference between her and the movie folks who actually will walk away with an Oscar on Feb. 24, when the Academy Awards are presented in Hollywood, was pretty minimal.
NEWS
By Marta H. Mossburg | March 18, 2011
Sun columnist Marta Mossburg, relatively new to Maryland, has a solution for all of our problems ("Baltimore: the view from 2021," March 16). Cut taxes and all will be well. Sure, the taxes in Baltimore are high. Baltimore is the home of many non-profits that don't pay property taxes. They are institutions that benefit the whole state. How do you solve that problem? Texas and Florida don't have income taxes and have far greater financial problems than Maryland. Maryland is number one in education while Florida and Texas are near the bottom.
NEWS
September 13, 2011
I drove to Baltimore on Labor Day weekend, parked in the lot of the Dollar General at Washington Boulevard and Martin Luther King Boulevard and went into the store. The sign in the lot said "vehicles parked illegally and non-permitted vehicles will be towed. " This is not too clear, but I figured that since I was a store customer it must not be illegal. I crossed Martin Luther King Boulevard and soon found that I was in the middle of the American Le Mans auto race. This was rather interesting so I stayed for a while and watched.
NEWS
June 6, 2011
Just when I thought Baltimore couldn't become less charming, it manages to do so. I've never seen a place that works so hard to ruin what's attractive and fun. To me, Honfest and all associated with it represent quintessential camp. Now the word "Hon" and vaguely associated merchandise have become restricted items ("'Hon' flap flares again as festival time nears," June 4). And we let this happen! Citizens of Baltimore — you should be ashamed! When someone goes to such length to destroy a cute happening that makes Baltimore a fun place to visit, I'm disgusted.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Influential alt-rockers Jane's Addiction and punk-rock vets Rise Against will headline the Shindig Music Festival on Sept. 27. Like last year, the all-day festival will take place at Baltimore's Carroll Park. Other acts scheduled to perform include Gogol Bordello, Clutch, Fishbone, Halestorm, Lucero, J. Roddy Walston and the Business, Larry and His Flask, The Mahones, The Bots, Charm City Devils, Bad Seed Rising and one more local artist still to be announced. An "early bird presale" will take place April 1-3, with a general admission price set at $50 and $150 for VIP. General public sale ($60 for general admission, $165 for VIP)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2014
Baltimore beer company The Brewer's Art received a cease and desist letter from representatives of Ozzy Osbourne over the brewery's popular pale ale named "Ozzy," (pictured above, on the left side), Brewer's Art co-owner Tom Creegan said this afternoon. The canned version of the beer features a logo depicting a clenched fist with the letters O-Z-Z-Y spelled on the fingers, similar to the hard-rock singer's own left hand. Bat imagery also appears, which is likely a reference to one of Osbourne's most infamous on-stage stunts .  Creegan declined to comment further on the news, first reported today by City Paper.
NEWS
March 11, 2014
I would like to respond to the Lutherville resident who wants to end the tradition of Arabbers ( "Baltimore Arabbers on edge after rash of run-ins with cars," March 5). My wife and I moved to West Baltimore in 1970. Arabbers were a vital link for this community to secure fresh produce. We have lived in Baltimore continuously since that time and have grown to love the Baltimore tradition of Arabbing, respect its vital role in giving "food desert" communities a lifeline to fresh produce and appreciate the contributions of Arabbers to the community, such as providing local children pony rides during neighborhood festivals.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
Christina Goodman's hand-painted raven faces left in strict profile, and despite the miniature scale carries the flavor of Renaissance portraiture in the sober expression and fine detail. It's one of her contributions to a small collection of handmade jewelry celebrating Baltimore and Maryland icons. The ravens, crabs, white oaks, orioles, black-eyed Susans and Edgar Allan Poes were on view this weekend as thousands of browsers and buyers strolled through the Baltimore Convention Center for the American Craft Council Show, its 38th year in the city.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2014
UPDATE: Such a great week for Baltimore singles.  Some love from Zillow, a snugly snow day, and now this: Kiplinger's, a personal finance magazine, says Baltimore is the sixth best city to fly solo. So what makes Charm City so charming for single people?  Here's what Kiplinger's says, "An inflated income can help you stay afloat in this waterfront city. With typical earnings coming in 27.1% higher than the national median, Baltimore residents should be able to handle the above-average living costs.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
When Carnival Cruise Lines decided to leave Baltimore last summer, saying the port had become too expensive because of environmental regulations, it was with substantial regret. The world's largest cruise line regularly filled its Carnival Pride cruise ship at the port of Baltimore with affluent first-time cruisers who found the Mid-Atlantic jumping-off point convenient. Meanwhile, Maryland saw about $50 million a year in economic value from the ship. After hearing the Pride would be heading to Florida to cut costs, state officials immediately began trying to salvage the relationship.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2011
Let's face it. Baltimore is ripe for satirizing. We've probably got more offbeat people, more distinctive edifices, more colorful history and habits per block than any metropolitan area in the country. Oh yeah, and some crime. The folks at Second City Theatricals, a wing of the venerable Chicago-based Second City enterprise, burrowed earlier this season into our little world, with all of its carefully demarcated neighborhoods. The material they gathered from the experience has been fashioned into a customized show that has settled into Center Stage for a long, no doubt profitable, run. "The Second City Does Baltimore" may be a little long for its own good, and may hit some obvious targets in, well, obvious ways, but there is an awful lot of fresh and very funny stuff here.
NEWS
Lionel Foster | February 21, 2013
I never thought I'd hear a Baltimorean say such a thing. Last week, while reporting on the Rawlings-Blake administration's 10-year financial plan, I spoke with the mayor's press secretary, Ian Brennan. We covered a lot of ground in our hourlong phone conversation, but one comment in particular rewound itself repeatedly in my mind like a game-deciding, goal-line drive. One day, said Mr. Brennan, "We would love to be spoken of like … Pittsburgh as a city not suffering post-industrial urban decay any longer.
NEWS
January 28, 2014
Baltimore needs to stop seeing red over the speed camera debacle and start seeing the "green" of grass. Having failed to raise badly needed funds through what amounts to highway robbery with inferior technology, let it go green instead and start selling marijuana. The city could have "weed wagons" that would potentially create a lot of green for the cash-strapped city (and incidentally, put it's Arabbers back to work). This could have a double benefit as well, since everyone knows that a stoned driver is a slow driver.
NEWS
January 23, 2014
Let's see if I've got this right: A committee of the Baltimore City Council will discuss the passage of a 10-cent "bag tax," following its earlier approval of a 5-cent "bottle tax" ( "Shoppers in city may see 10-cent bag fee," Jan. 21). The council should just pass a "breathing tax" to make it a triple header of taxes starting with the letter "b. " Then no one will want to live or shop in Charm City. Terren M. Himelfarb, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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