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NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | July 18, 1995
WHEN IT comes to news reporting, the old city-room edict is always: first, get the story; and second, get it right. When the writer gets it wrong, it's a mess. It gets the reader who knows better all upset, confuses history and puts an error in the record books. I know; I've had my share of errors.Recently, the New York Times, which is known for its excellence, included what some of us around Baltimore consider a glaring error. On Sunday, July 9, the Times published an article about Baltimore in its travel section, called "What's Doing in Baltimore," by writer Melinda Henneberger.
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NEWS
October 12, 2014
In reference to the front page article on Oct. 7, "$1 fare eyed for free buses," I for one will not use the Charm City Circular if $1 charge is imposed; that's only one way, so the cost is really $2. I have a hybrid car, but in my opinion having a hybrid vehicle does not mean I can still drive because I use less gas and cause less damage to the atmosphere; no, it means that I too still have to drive less. The $1 (two-way, $2) charge is way more then the cost of me driving my hybrid.
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NEWS
December 4, 2012
In 1985 I bought a small house in the Cedmont neighborhood in Northeast Baltimore. At the time, I knew nothing about Formstone ("Formstone would be banned on new buildings under proposal," Dec. 1). I have found it to be beautiful, especially up close when it includes subtle shades of pale pink, blue, and gray with sparkles. Several years ago, a storm damaged a small piece of Formstone. I had some difficulty finding a person who could repair it properly, and I am pleased the Formstone artist blended in the new with the old. Baltimore has many charms we can all enjoy, and I'm very pleased to live here and have a unique home.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
A painting of a confident-looking bulldog wearing a Baltimore Orioles baseball cap propped outside the artist Robert McClintock's studio bears a caption reading, "How 'bout dem O's, hon!" The artist Tom Matarazzo's hand-painted screens of the Orioles Bird, with jauntily tipped cap and grinning beak, have never been more in demand than they are this month. Steve Mull's colored-marker drawing of an Orioles team jersey, mitt and a pair of steamed crabs evokes such strong associations with the city that you can practically taste the Old Bay seasoning on those crustaceans.
NEWS
March 23, 2011
I read with interest your feature about Baltimore workers and former citizens moving to Pennsylvania ( "Md. transplants seen as helping to drive growth of York County, Pa.," March 22). I wish you would write about the city dwellers and home owners like me. We occasionally see stories about high-end rehab buyers in the Real Estate section, people who are living in neighborhoods like Patterson Park, Butchers Hill, Federal Hill and Canton. But what about the rest of us who bought in the 1990s?
NEWS
June 15, 2013
The problem in the city regarding trash is the city residents themselves ("A better bag tax," June 12). I drive the Fulton/Monroe corridor every day, and if there's a pile of trash accumulating on the street, every day it just gets larger. Car occupants dump their ashtray or will drop a McDonald's bag out the car window onto the street. What's lacking in a city is not a bag tax, its pride in your city. R.J. Stryjewski, Baltimore
NEWS
October 6, 2014
I have visited a lot of major cities in my lifetime, but until now I was never inclined to email or write a letter to the editor of the city newspaper to comment about the city and its people. From a recent visit I had to Baltimore, I have found that you have some of the nicest, friendliest and most helpful people I have ever encountered. In particular I owe a debt of gratitude to a gentleman named Mark who helped my wife and I when we got stranded at the train station trying to see the Orioles' last home game.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2013
Christina Spearman dug out her best high school formal gown, took the day off work and headed down to the Inner Harbor on Friday morning to realize the dream of a lifetime. She was getting an Oscar. OK, that's a stretch. What she was actually getting, thanks to an 11-city Oscar Roadtrip that stopped in Baltimore, was the chance to pose with an Oscar — to hold the 81/2-pound gold-plated statuette for a few seconds and have her picture snapped with it. But the degree of difference between her and the movie folks who actually will walk away with an Oscar on Feb. 24, when the Academy Awards are presented in Hollywood, was pretty minimal.
NEWS
By Marta H. Mossburg | March 18, 2011
Sun columnist Marta Mossburg, relatively new to Maryland, has a solution for all of our problems ("Baltimore: the view from 2021," March 16). Cut taxes and all will be well. Sure, the taxes in Baltimore are high. Baltimore is the home of many non-profits that don't pay property taxes. They are institutions that benefit the whole state. How do you solve that problem? Texas and Florida don't have income taxes and have far greater financial problems than Maryland. Maryland is number one in education while Florida and Texas are near the bottom.
NEWS
September 13, 2011
I drove to Baltimore on Labor Day weekend, parked in the lot of the Dollar General at Washington Boulevard and Martin Luther King Boulevard and went into the store. The sign in the lot said "vehicles parked illegally and non-permitted vehicles will be towed. " This is not too clear, but I figured that since I was a store customer it must not be illegal. I crossed Martin Luther King Boulevard and soon found that I was in the middle of the American Le Mans auto race. This was rather interesting so I stayed for a while and watched.
NEWS
October 6, 2014
I have visited a lot of major cities in my lifetime, but until now I was never inclined to email or write a letter to the editor of the city newspaper to comment about the city and its people. From a recent visit I had to Baltimore, I have found that you have some of the nicest, friendliest and most helpful people I have ever encountered. In particular I owe a debt of gratitude to a gentleman named Mark who helped my wife and I when we got stranded at the train station trying to see the Orioles' last home game.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ellen Fishel and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
My story isn't all that groundbreaking. I'm 23, officially a year removed from the University of Maryland-College Park and walking that ever-shaky line between being a functional adult and an irresponsible mess. It's a story you've heard many times before (probably in some form of Internet listicle). And it's also one that many of you are probably experiencing right now, or at least can remember when you were. My column will try to shed light on what being in this awkward half-stage of life really means.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
The Baltimore Running Festival consistently generates about $40 million in economic impact each year, according to official estimates, and at its peak, the Grand Prix of Baltimore pumped $47 million into area hotels, restaurants and stores. Organizers of 2012's Star-Spangled Sailabration say that weeklong event poured even more money - about $166 million - into the local economy. But city officials say this week's Star-Spangled Spectacular - which marks 200 years since troops in Baltimore beat back a British invasion and the national anthem was written - could surpass all those totals.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
Oh, say can you see a new slogan for Baltimore City? Councilman James B. Kraft can. He petitioned his fellow City Council members to pass a resolution Monday declaring a new official motto for the city: "Baltimore - Birthplace of The Star-Spangled Banner. " The new declaration coincides with the bicentennial commemoration of the War of 1812, which begins Wednesday. "Every day someone around this globe is singing 'The Star-Spangled Banner,'" Kraft said, "and that 'Star-Spangled Banner' started here, right in the harbor, right down the street.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
How's "Baltimore - Birthplace of the Star-Spangled Banner" sound for a new city slogan? City Councilman James B. Kraft is expected to introduce legislation at Monday's meeting to set a new official slogan to "celebrate Baltimore's essential link to our national anthem. " Kraft, who represents Southeast Baltimore, is asking for immediate adoption of a resolution to set the new slogan. He's also expected to file a companion bill. It's too soon to tell if the slogan will have more staying more power than the city's last: "Baltimore: A Great Place to Grow," which was unveiled by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake in 2011.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
After poring through 20 boxes of Betsy Bonaparte's correspondence at the Maryland Historical Society, Natalie Wexler's heart sank. In 2005, Wexler had been captivated by a portrait she'd seen of the Baltimore-born beauty, who wed Jerome Bonaparte, Napoleon's youngest brother, against the French emperor's wishes. Wexler is an author, a historian and an attorney. She itched to tell Betsy's story - until she started reading the letters. "Betsy was really not a very pleasant person," says Wexler, now 59 and a Washington resident.
NEWS
June 6, 2011
Just when I thought Baltimore couldn't become less charming, it manages to do so. I've never seen a place that works so hard to ruin what's attractive and fun. To me, Honfest and all associated with it represent quintessential camp. Now the word "Hon" and vaguely associated merchandise have become restricted items ("'Hon' flap flares again as festival time nears," June 4). And we let this happen! Citizens of Baltimore — you should be ashamed! When someone goes to such length to destroy a cute happening that makes Baltimore a fun place to visit, I'm disgusted.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2011
Let's face it. Baltimore is ripe for satirizing. We've probably got more offbeat people, more distinctive edifices, more colorful history and habits per block than any metropolitan area in the country. Oh yeah, and some crime. The folks at Second City Theatricals, a wing of the venerable Chicago-based Second City enterprise, burrowed earlier this season into our little world, with all of its carefully demarcated neighborhoods. The material they gathered from the experience has been fashioned into a customized show that has settled into Center Stage for a long, no doubt profitable, run. "The Second City Does Baltimore" may be a little long for its own good, and may hit some obvious targets in, well, obvious ways, but there is an awful lot of fresh and very funny stuff here.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
Horseshoe Casino Baltimore has added Charm City Cakes to its dining lineup.  The $442 million gaming complex announced that the Remington-based bakery, made famous on the cable TV show "Ace of Cakes," will "provide a wide array of baked goods, experiences and merchandise" to guests at the casino, which has announced an Aug. 26 opening.  The bakery will produce custom desserts for the casino's Jack Binion Steakhouse and will also...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
William G. "Bill" Evans, an award-winning Baltimore advertising executive who was the creative force behind the enduring "Charm City" advertising campaign of the early 1970s, died June 20 of cancer at the Hospice of Queen Anne's in Centreville. He was 83. "Bill certainly came out of the 'Mad Men' world. He was one of the first new breed of intellectual advertising writers. And he was definitely a character. There is no question about that. He was a very unique guy and writer," recalled ad executive Allan Charles, who began working with Mr. Evans in the early 1970s.
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