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NEWS
September 11, 2002
Claudius Rogers Hall Jr., who practiced law in Westminster for many years, died of pneumonia Thursday at University of Virginia hospital in Charlottesville. He was 78 and formerly resided in New Windsor. Born and raised in Eldersburg, Mr. Hall was a graduate of Sykesville High School. He earned his bachelor's degree from the University of Maryland, and his law degree from the University of Baltimore. He served in the Marine Corps in the Pacific during World War II. Mr. Hall, who maintained a general law practice for years, started his career in the 1950s in Baltimore.
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SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2002
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. -- Now that the Maryland Terrapins have shown they know how to win on the road, it is time for them to erase one more blemish from their recent past and sustain the momentum that is carrying them as one of the nation's elite teams. And what better place for the No. 3 Terps to make another mark than University Hall, where they have been known to stumble? Junior point guard Steve Blake, like every other Maryland player besides seniors Juan Dixon and Lonny Baxter, has never experienced a victory at Virginia, which has won the past two meetings while playing host to Maryland.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 17, 2001
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. - Thomas Jefferson inspired the project that, 174 years after his death, has roused his hometown: a monument to free speech. But the opportunity to let people write whatever they want on a big chalkboard downtown has some townsfolk worried about what their neighbors might say. And those fears have dominated the debate over the proposed monument, a 7-foot-high slate chalkboard that would be built on public property across the street...
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Fletcher and Stephanie Fletcher,Special to the Sun | September 19, 1999
An imposing antique forms a backdrop behind the reception desk at the Boar's Head Inn in Charlottesville, Va. The bottom portion contains shallow drawers, while the top half displays several rows of cubbyholes that once functioned as hotel mailboxes. Thick brass discs, each bearing the carved likeness of a wild boar, dangle from cup hooks at the tops of the cubbyholes. The golden ornaments form long, neat lines that gleam in the overhead light. When I ask the receptionist if I can take a closer look, she hands me a hefty fob attached to a brass key, and the heavy, glittering disc covers my entire palm.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | May 27, 1998
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. -- Melvin Whitaker came here a little more than two years ago as a promising basketball player with hopes of making a name for himself at the University of Virginia. He accomplished that, though not the way he planned.Whitaker left this college town last week without having attended a class or played in a game for the Cavaliers. He left not as a transfer from Virginia, but as a transfer from the Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail.And he wasn't going yet to Mount St. Mary's College, the school Whitaker committed to in March and hopes to play for next season, but to the Southampton Correctional Center, a medium-security facility in southeastern Virginia.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | August 14, 1997
Robert Leeman, head professional at Bonnie View Country Club, reeled off six birdies in turning in a 2-under-par 70 to lead 32 pros yesterday in the Old South CC pro-invitation tournament in Lothian.The annual event set area one-day records for purse ($10,300) and individual first-place prize ($4,000).Mark Evenson, assistant professional at Rolling Road Golf Club, had six birdies, too, in posting 71.Professional John Dodson, from Twin Shields Golf Club in Dunkirk, combined with Old South amateurs Jeff McKnight, Jack Van Wie, Jim Van Wie, and Bill Van Wie to win the pro-am team prize with a 60.Farmington InvitationFirst-round leader Amy Ellertson, from Charlottesville, Va., slipped to a 77, but her two-round total of 150 enabled her to share the lead with Catalina Durall, of Richmond, Va., heading into today's final round of the women's tournament at Farmington Country Club in Charlottesville.
FEATURES
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,Contributing Writer | April 18, 1993
When President-elect Bill Clinton stopped off at Thomas Jefferson's beloved Monticello estate during his inaugural bus trip to Washington in January, a youngster who had won a "Dear Mr. President" essay contest asked him what governmental job he would give to the great American statesman and patriot today."
NEWS
January 17, 1992
The University of Maryland's women's basketball team, having just beaten the No. 1 ranked University of Virginia, is surely going to be rated No. 1 itself in the nation next week. That will be the first time in the program's history. Congratulations to Coach Chris Weller and her players. Coach Weller's program has long been well respected, and this team is going to make it more so. Maybe now they will even get some respect in terms of fans in the stands. There were 8,000 watching at Charlottesville, far more than the Terps are used to at home at College Park.
NEWS
By Earl P. Schubert | September 13, 1991
the kind at an inopportune moment that makes some coaches dream of another, less heart-breaking career.Last Saturday, with 22,661 fans celebrating a gala opening of the football season at Navy Marine Corps Stadium, a young Mid team found out the hard way that there is nosubstitute for experience in losing to Ball State, 33-10.And those "Ball State-who" disclaimers in the stands found out that they play interesting, hard-nosed football in the Mid-American Conference.The prediction here is that the Mids ultimately will right the ship and be a very respectable ballclub, because some very key positive things happened on the field.
NEWS
By B. Drummond Ayres Jr. and B. Drummond Ayres Jr.,New York Times News Service | March 23, 1991
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. -- Dozens of federal, state and local law officers swept down onto the University of Virginia's fraternity row late Thursday and early yesterday, seizing bags of marijuana, hallucinogenic mushrooms and LSD and arresting eight students on charges of selling drugs.The raid, in which three fraternity houses and their contents were also seized, shocked and embarrassed the university, which since its founding by Thomas Jefferson has taken great pride in its national reputation as a place of scholarly excellence and campus civility.
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