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NEWS
May 26, 1995
Carroll County's Manchester has a new window on the world. It's a glass wall in an eight-sided wooden frame building set in a meadow of the town's Pine Valley Park, down the hill and through the woods from Manchester Elementary School.The new nature center was formally opened for the community this month, although the school has been using it for outside classes for a while now. It's a place to recall the discoveries of a nearby field trip, to work on art and writing projects, to display nature projects and student artwork.
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NEWS
By David L. Ulin and David L. Ulin,Los Angeles Times | December 17, 2006
Charlotte's Web E.B. White Harper Entertainment / 184 pages / $16.99 The summer my son Noah was 5, he went on a Charlotte's Web kick. Or no, not kick: That doesn't quite capture the binge-like insistence of it, the way E.B. White's 1952 children's classic became the centerpiece of his life. For months, we read it to him every night, chapter by chapter, beginning again each time we reached the end. By the time September arrived and Noah's attention had led on to other entertainments, we had read Charlotte's Web perhaps 10 times, and I (who had never loved the book as a child)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | November 18, 2004
Regal holiday treat Since it's getting a little too cold for kids to play outside, Regal Entertainment wants to treat children and their families to a free movie (or five). For five consecutive Saturdays, starting this Saturday, the Snowden Square Stadium 14 and Bel Air Stadium 14 movie theaters will offer a free showing of a holiday movie at 10 a.m. The movies are rated either G or PG, and include The Grinch, Peter Pan, Home Alone, Miracle on 34th Street, Jimmy Neutron, Rugrats and others.
NEWS
By SUSAN GVOZDAS and SUSAN GVOZDAS,Special to The Sun | December 17, 2006
The thought that she could help break a world record was enough to keep Cara Grimes awake past her bedtime. And all it required was something the 7-year-old likes to do anyway: read. The second-grader at Hilltop Elementary School in Glen Burnie was among more than 500,000 children in 28 countries who took part in a publicity stunt Wednesday to simultaneously read two pages of Charlotte's Web at noon. Organized by entertainment company Walden Media and publisher HarperCollins, the event was geared to promote Friday's release of Paramount Pictures' live-action movie.
NEWS
By David L. Ulin and David L. Ulin,Los Angeles Times | December 17, 2006
Charlotte's Web E.B. White Harper Entertainment / 184 pages / $16.99 The summer my son Noah was 5, he went on a Charlotte's Web kick. Or no, not kick: That doesn't quite capture the binge-like insistence of it, the way E.B. White's 1952 children's classic became the centerpiece of his life. For months, we read it to him every night, chapter by chapter, beginning again each time we reached the end. By the time September arrived and Noah's attention had led on to other entertainments, we had read Charlotte's Web perhaps 10 times, and I (who had never loved the book as a child)
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | August 7, 1995
Charlotte, N.C. -- Conventional wisdom says the cost ofcomputers, telephone and cable connections will bar low-income people from the Information Highway for years to come.But check again. Technological whizzes working with the ''Charlotte's Web,'' a community-based computer service online since October, have found a way -- at phenomenally low cost -- to wire an after-school tutoring center located in a 50-year-old public housing project.First, the Charlotte's Web crew lined up a bunch of donated 286 PC's -- a model once the industry standard, now considered so outmoded that many corporations have roomfuls they're anxious give away.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 24, 1997
The end of the year is a time to reminisce, and there is cause for celebrating the number and quality of cultural events offered in Anne Arundel County. But the audiences present another issue. Those that I've been part of over the past year have been overwhelmingly middle-aged.To survive, the arts need to attract more young people. Doing my part, I have been sharing an array of cultural diversions over the past year with my granddaughter, Marie, who is nearly 6.Like most children, she is a tough, honest critic, unwavering in her loyalty to favorite performers and characters.
FEATURES
By Ron Dickers and Ron Dickers,Hartford Courant | December 15, 2006
In Charlotte's Web, opening today, Dakota Fanning's farm girl grabs an ax from her father as he is about to slaughter a runt piglet. "I will not let you kill him," her Fern declares. Dakota's first take of the scene wowed director Gary Winick, who told his charge it was better than Meryl Streep. But this was a children's movie. He asked her to do it again. "The next take, she was a 10," Winick recalls. "She totally simplified it and got it to be innocent and instinctual." That is Dakota, the technician and the natural.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | December 15, 2006
There's a golden minute that epitomizes everything that's gone wonderfully right with the new live-action movie version of E.B. White's 1952 novel, Charlotte's Web. "Go to sleep my little one," the girl Fern croons to her beloved runt pig, Wilbur, with words as plain and full of feeling as if she'd just thought them up and had to sing them out. "The sun has said goodbye for now. The moon shines on your beautiful face. ... " And then, in mid-stanza, as quickly as Fern pipes it up, the lullaby fades, the emotion of its melody and verse perfected by the tingling purity of Dakota Fanning's performance as Fern and the homey nocturnal light that blankets the girl and Wilbur.
FEATURES
By Ron Dickers and Ron Dickers,Hartford Courant | December 15, 2006
In Charlotte's Web, opening today, Dakota Fanning's farm girl grabs an ax from her father as he is about to slaughter a runt piglet. "I will not let you kill him," her Fern declares. Dakota's first take of the scene wowed director Gary Winick, who told his charge it was better than Meryl Streep. But this was a children's movie. He asked her to do it again. "The next take, she was a 10," Winick recalls. "She totally simplified it and got it to be innocent and instinctual." That is Dakota, the technician and the natural.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | December 15, 2006
There's a golden minute that epitomizes everything that's gone wonderfully right with the new live-action movie version of E.B. White's 1952 novel, Charlotte's Web. "Go to sleep my little one," the girl Fern croons to her beloved runt pig, Wilbur, with words as plain and full of feeling as if she'd just thought them up and had to sing them out. "The sun has said goodbye for now. The moon shines on your beautiful face. ... " And then, in mid-stanza, as quickly as Fern pipes it up, the lullaby fades, the emotion of its melody and verse perfected by the tingling purity of Dakota Fanning's performance as Fern and the homey nocturnal light that blankets the girl and Wilbur.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | January 6, 2005
First First Thursday Celebrate the first Thursday of the new year at the Baltimore Museum of Art today. The museum's monthly Free First Thursday takes place all day today. Visitors get free museum admission, half-price tickets to the exhibit In Monet's Light: Theodore Robinson at Giverny, evening activities with an African theme, and more. Evening activities include storytelling from the Griot Circle of Maryland, live music from Wato Sita, tours of the museum's African art collection and arts and crafts workshops.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 13, 2000
We might declare that literature's most famous spider, the title character in "Charlotte's Web," spun the original Web site. The spider and her friends will be onstage when Anne Arundel Community College's Moonlight Troupers present Joseph Robinette's adaptation of E. B. White's classic children's tale "Charlotte's Web." Spider Charlotte will weave the message "Some Pig" into her web to advertise the perfection of her friend Wilbur, who is the pet pig of a girl named Fern Arable. The story deals with the harsh realities of farm life as Fern spares runt pig Wilbur from her father's ax only to discover that Wilbur is slated for the slaughterhouse.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | August 31, 1999
" `Where's Papa going with that ax?' said Fern to her mother as they were setting the table for breakfast. `Out to the hoghouse,' replied Mrs. Arable. `Some pigs were born last night.' " So begins a perfectly perfect book called "Charlotte's Web" by Elwyn Brooks White, a writer born precisely 100 years ago. Remembered for his pieces in the New Yorker and for his trio of children's books, E.B. White's legacy continues this year with the theatrical release of "Stuart Little." While the story of White's little mouse could be the talk of the town, it is "Charlotte's Web" we are reminded of amid the livestock pens at the Maryland State Fair, which is well under way in Timonium.
NEWS
By Ronald Thorpe | July 22, 1999
IF THERE's ever a national vote for the nation's man or woman of letters of the 20th century, one of my top choices would be Elwyn Brooks White, who would have celebrated his 100th birthday this month.He was, as he himself said, "a writing man," whose job was "the safekeeping of all unexpected items of worldly or unworldly enchantment." But he was far more than a steward.White had a gift for making things personal. He is the quintessential "everyman," rich in dignity, devoid of pretense, a Charlie Chaplin of the printed page.
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