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By Chris Kaltenbach and Sun reporter | February 26, 2012
In winning the Supporting Actor Oscar for "Beginners," 82-year-old Christopher Plummer became the oldest Oscar winner ever in the acting categeories. But backstage, he good-naturedly declined that distinction. "I don't believe that for a second," Plummer said, claiming that Charlie Chaplin was older when he received an honorary Oscar in 1972. "An honorary Oscar is an Oscar after all," Plummer insisted, before adding, "We hope. " Whatever the distinction, Plummer added, "It feels pretty good, anyway.
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By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2014
Everyone from Sinatra to the Supremes and the Monkees makes this rundown of the top Billboard Hot 100 tracks 47 years ago. 10. "Jimmy Mack," Martha and the Vandellas This was oiginally written as a tribute to songwriter Ronnie Mack ("He's So Fine"), but I wonder how Scottish broadcaster Jimmy Mack felt about the song. 9. "Bernadette," Four Tops A Motown classic, written and produced by the famed team of Brian Holland-Lamont Dozier-Eddie Holland, who, by the way, also was responsible for "Jimmy Mack.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra music director Marin Alsop has canceled her scheduled appearances this week with the ensemble. Her mother, a cellist who spent several decades in the New York City Ballet Orchestra, died late last week in upstate New York at the age of 82. BSO principal pops conductor Jack Everly will be on the podium for the concerts, which feature the showing of two 1920s Charlie Chaplin films, "The Kid" and "The Idle Class," with...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra music director Marin Alsop has canceled her scheduled appearances this week with the ensemble. Her mother, a cellist who spent several decades in the New York City Ballet Orchestra, died late last week in upstate New York at the age of 82. BSO principal pops conductor Jack Everly will be on the podium for the concerts, which feature the showing of two 1920s Charlie Chaplin films, "The Kid" and "The Idle Class," with...
NEWS
By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2014
Everyone from Sinatra to the Supremes and the Monkees makes this rundown of the top Billboard Hot 100 tracks 47 years ago. 10. "Jimmy Mack," Martha and the Vandellas This was oiginally written as a tribute to songwriter Ronnie Mack ("He's So Fine"), but I wonder how Scottish broadcaster Jimmy Mack felt about the song. 9. "Bernadette," Four Tops A Motown classic, written and produced by the famed team of Brian Holland-Lamont Dozier-Eddie Holland, who, by the way, also was responsible for "Jimmy Mack.
FEATURES
By Knight Ridder News Service | January 5, 1993
It must be very strange playing your own grandmother in a movie about your father.Geraldine Chaplin, who is Charlie Chaplin's oldest child, portrays her grandmother, Hannah, in the film "Chaplin," which opens nationally Friday.She says it was far more startling seeing Robert Downey Jr. as her father.Chaplin was 55 when she was born, so she can't relate to Chaplin's early years. "As an older man he [Robert] looks exactly like my father," she says."It was very strange."Her father talked occasionally about Hannah, who suffered bouts of insanity and spent much of her adult life in asylums.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | August 4, 1991
New releases of videocassettes; reviews by New York Times critics.Here are some notable releases of the last few months."Awakenings." 1990. RCA/Columbia. $92.95. Laser disk, $39.95. 2 hours. Closed captioned. PG-13.In a deep trance since childhood, Leonard Lowe (Robert De Niro) and other victims of encephalitis lethargica are revived by the drug L-dopa and the ministrations of Dr. Malcolm Sayer (Robin Williams).While the De Niro and Williams performances are affecting, the adaptation "both sentimentalizes its story and oversimplifies it beyond recognition" (Janet Maslin)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | March 17, 2002
The Immediate Experience: Movies, Comics, Theatre and Other Aspects of Popular Culture, by Robert Warshow (Harvard University Press, 302 pages, $18.95). Warshow died in 1955, of a far too early heart attack, at 37. He was an extrordinarily analytic, smart member of the New York noncommunist intellectual left. Published in Partisan Review, The Nation and Commentary, where he served as movie editor, he was a very influential mind of his times. This is a virtually all-inclusive anthology of his published writings.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Sun | September 21, 2007
David Prince, Syracuse University Art Galleries' associate director, drew an overflow audience to the kickoff event of the Mitchell Gallery's exhibit The Artist Revealed: Artist Portraits and Self-Portraits, sharing stories that illuminate the 51 works. In 2004, when Prince initially assembled the exhibition in Syracuse, N.Y., he found "the broadest cross-section possible drawn from our permanent collection," which now helps visitors to the gallery on the St. John's College campus discover what defines portraiture.
NEWS
March 30, 2002
THOSE BIG luscious lips and those big front teeth that looked as though they ought to be at work somewhere building a beaver dam and those big awful jokes that were so bad you just couldn't wait for the next one. That was Milton Berle. Was it really 54 years ago that he put television on the map with NBC's Texaco Star Theater? Yeah, and you know what? He'd already been in show business 34 years by that time. That's the startling thing. Vaudeville, where the young comedian got his start, was closer to early TV than early TV is to us. Men and women who had played the circuits, living out of trunks and traveling by train, brought a whole ethic of live entertainment and hard work and greasepaint and slapstick and being funny to those early days of the tube.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Sun reporter | February 26, 2012
In winning the Supporting Actor Oscar for "Beginners," 82-year-old Christopher Plummer became the oldest Oscar winner ever in the acting categeories. But backstage, he good-naturedly declined that distinction. "I don't believe that for a second," Plummer said, claiming that Charlie Chaplin was older when he received an honorary Oscar in 1972. "An honorary Oscar is an Oscar after all," Plummer insisted, before adding, "We hope. " Whatever the distinction, Plummer added, "It feels pretty good, anyway.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2012
The most towering figure in Hollywood history wore ill-fitting clothes, including shoes several sizes too big, and never said a word. Beginning Saturday, he'll be spending a year at Baltimore's Charles Theatre . Charlie Chaplin, a British expatriate who became the first Hollywood superstar and made a series of films — as writer, director and star — still as astonishingly delightful today as they were in the 1920s, is the subject of a...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Janell Sutherland | December 5, 2011
Remember last week? When there were waffles? And some cars and boats, but mostly waffles!? Now there are four teams racing to the finale, and this week I get to introduce you to the friendliest taxi drivers in the world. First, we must bid farewell to Atomium, the centerpiece of the 1958 World's Fair. The teams got to sleep in little pods inside Atomium, and that is basically awesome. Teams leave Atomium in the middle of the night with a box of costumes. They have to wear black suits, skinny ties, moustaches and bowler hats.
FEATURES
By Carina Chocano and Carina Chocano,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 11, 2008
You could call Harmony Korine's Mister Lonely a comeback, but that would imply the return was anticipated, or that it heralds a return to form. I'm not sure either description applies. Mister Lonely is just as unconventional, by Hollywood standards, as his earlier films, if markedly less pugnacious. In his latest picture, Korine, who is best known for his screenplay Kids (written in a matter of weeks at the tender age of 22) and the experimental provocations of Gummo and Julien Donkey-Boy, seems to be working through some of the things he went through as wunderkind-turned-washout, taking on the desire to be somebody else and faith in the impossible as themes and manifesting them in his singular, surreal style.
NEWS
December 23, 2007
THE ART OF THE AMERICAN SNAPSHOT -- Sarah Greenough Princeton University / 294 pages / $55 The impact of the humble American snapshot has been anything but humble. Any American who takes a snapshot contributes to a compelling and influential genre. Since 1888, when George Eastman introduced the Kodak camera and roll film, the snapshot has not only changed everyday American life and memory; it has also changed the history of fine art photography. The distinctive subject matter and visual vocabulary of the American snapshot - its poses, facial expressions, viewpoints, framing and themes - influenced modernist photographers as they explored spontaneity, objectivity and new topics and perspectives.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Sun | September 21, 2007
David Prince, Syracuse University Art Galleries' associate director, drew an overflow audience to the kickoff event of the Mitchell Gallery's exhibit The Artist Revealed: Artist Portraits and Self-Portraits, sharing stories that illuminate the 51 works. In 2004, when Prince initially assembled the exhibition in Syracuse, N.Y., he found "the broadest cross-section possible drawn from our permanent collection," which now helps visitors to the gallery on the St. John's College campus discover what defines portraiture.
NEWS
December 30, 1994
FOOTBALL fanatics, take note: Jan. 1 will bring back special memories, as recounted in Harvard magazine:"New Year's Day marks the 75th anniversary of Harvard's only Rose Bowl appearance. The Crimson gridders of 1919, coached by Robert T. Fisher '12 and starring all-American back Eddie Casey '19, had gone unbeaten in nine regular-season games, scoring 222 points and giving up only 19. After a 10-10 draw with Princeton, they'd finished triumphantly with a 10-3 defeat of Yale. An invitation from the Tournament of Roses arrived a week later."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 10, 1993
It is, finally, the story of a little boy and a Little Tramp.The Little Tramp, of course, was the cinema genius Charlie Chaplin's abiding creation, a banty little Everyguy always down on his luck, yet always touched with a grace and pluck that has seen no equal. He could, with the ease of a butterfly alighting on a daisy, break your heart with sadness or bust your butt with laughter in the glorious days before the movies learned to talk or blow up. With his floppy shoes and wisp of mustache and sad-sack wardrobe, he spoke more eloquently of the human condition than a library of books.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 13, 2005
I'd just finished lunch at a dockside cafe in Vietnam's Mekong Delta, south of Saigon, where nothing on the menu - grilled fish, crispy spring rolls or litchi nuts for dessert - prepared me for a startling suggestion of an after-dinner drink. Would I care for some snake liqueur? The smiling waitress, undeterred by what must have been my look of dismay, brought forth a glass jug of rice wine, at the bottom of which was coiled a dead cobra. Hmmm. Was I a man or a mouse? When she assured me this elixir strengthens one's vitality, I meekly sipped a liquid that was viscous, peppery and almost disappointingly sweet.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 17, 2002
In The Cat's Meow, Edward Herrmann's William Randolph Hearst tries to play the fun-loving host of a yacht party for the likes of Charlie Chaplin (Eddie Izzard). But from the start he moves with the stricken and bewildered heaviness of a wounded elephant. Herrmann and his director, Peter Bogdanovich, and his screenwriter, Steven Peros, have transformed the tale of Hearst's most disastrous pleasure cruise into a masochistic, histrionic showcase on the order of The Blue Angel. Hermann's Hearst is an emotionally needy monarch in a jester's hat who turns menacing when he learns that his beloved mistress Marion Davies (Kirsten Dunst)
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