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Charlie Baker

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NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | March 12, 1995
David B. Reynolds is truly an unparalleled foreigner in these parts.That might seem a strange thing to say about a local actor who has been on every area stage since he broke in with the Children's Theatre of Annapolis nearly 15 years ago. But when you see the hilarious Mr. Reynolds as Charlie Baker in the new Chesapeake Music Hall production of Larry Shue's play "The Foreigner," you'll know what I mean.Brit Charlie Baker is such a bore that his own wife can't bear having him around -- even when she's on her death bed.On a quick trip to Georgia to visit an old army buddy, Charlie becomes so panic-stricken at the thought of having to make chit-chat with his fellow guests at Betty Meeks' broken-down hotel, that his friend passes him off as a foreigner who speaks and understands no English.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
In the canon of stage comedies, Larry Shue's "The Foreigner" may not rank in the uppermost percentile, but there sure is something awfully likable about it. The work has been widely and frequently performed since its off-Broadway premiere in 1984, a year before the playwright's death in a plane crash at the age of 39. It offers abundant opportunities for actors -- there really is no small part -- and a plot that manages to combine wacky humor with...
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NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2010
The problem: A street sign was misspelled in Druid Heights. The back story: Watchdog takes Sun staff to and through many different neighborhoods in and around Baltimore. During that quest to find the quickest path from a report of a street light out in one community to a leaking water meter in another, Watchdog sometimes stumbles on an issue before a reader has a chance to point it out. In this case, "Druid" on the sign for Druid Hill Avenue at Bloom Street included an extra "L" in it. No other sign on the street was incorrectly spelled.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2010
Annapolis' only professional theater gains added stature with its current production of Larry Shue's "The Foreigner," the story of a proofreader on vacation who is so shy that he pretends not to understand English, paving the way for the people around him to speak frankly and betray their secrets. The play — at Bay Theatre through Jan. 8 — is directed by Vincent Lancisi, who is the artistic director at Baltimore-based Everyman Theatre . Herald Harbor resident Lancisi volunteered over the summer to direct Shue's farce for Bay Theatre.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | January 7, 1992
Charlie Baker is one of those unhappy British chaps whose own wife finds him shatteringly and profoundly boring, even on her deathbed.On a quick getaway visit to the States to visit his old army buddy, Charlie becomes so panic-stricken at the thought of having to make conversation with the strangers on hand at Betty Meeks' Georgia resort that his friend passes him off as a non-English speaking foreigner incapable of understanding or communicating a word...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
In the canon of stage comedies, Larry Shue's "The Foreigner" may not rank in the uppermost percentile, but there sure is something awfully likable about it. The work has been widely and frequently performed since its off-Broadway premiere in 1984, a year before the playwright's death in a plane crash at the age of 39. It offers abundant opportunities for actors -- there really is no small part -- and a plot that manages to combine wacky humor with...
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2010
Annapolis' only professional theater gains added stature with its current production of Larry Shue's "The Foreigner," the story of a proofreader on vacation who is so shy that he pretends not to understand English, paving the way for the people around him to speak frankly and betray their secrets. The play — at Bay Theatre through Jan. 8 — is directed by Vincent Lancisi, who is the artistic director at Baltimore-based Everyman Theatre . Herald Harbor resident Lancisi volunteered over the summer to direct Shue's farce for Bay Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2010
You know the feeling — well, some of you, at least. You walk into a room full of strangers and can't think of anything remotely interesting to say. You really don't want to try saying anything and would much rather just disappear into the wallpaper. So it is with Charlie Baker, a far-from-gregarious Brit who faces such an intimidating predicament at the start of Larry Shue's "The Foreigner," a much-performed comedy being given a vibrant production by the Bay Theatre Company, Anne Arundel's only professional troupe.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 13, 2003
This is the last weekend to catch Larry Shue's farce The Foreigner at the Audrey Herman Spotlighters Theatre. Michael Sullivan plays Charlie Baker, a man so painfully shy that he pretends not to speak English, just to avoid conversations with strangers. Peter Jensen plays Froggy LeSueur, the friend who concocts this plan of silence to save Charlie from humiliation. And Sherrionne Brown is the innkeeper at whose establishment bashful Charlie becomes the reluctant repository of all sorts of little secrets.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 20, 1997
Two comedies, "The Foreigner" and "Arsenic and Old Lace," are being staged at the Chesapeake Music Hall on alternate weekends through April 30, and both are worth seeing."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2010
You know the feeling — well, some of you, at least. You walk into a room full of strangers and can't think of anything remotely interesting to say. You really don't want to try saying anything and would much rather just disappear into the wallpaper. So it is with Charlie Baker, a far-from-gregarious Brit who faces such an intimidating predicament at the start of Larry Shue's "The Foreigner," a much-performed comedy being given a vibrant production by the Bay Theatre Company, Anne Arundel's only professional troupe.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2010
The problem: A street sign was misspelled in Druid Heights. The back story: Watchdog takes Sun staff to and through many different neighborhoods in and around Baltimore. During that quest to find the quickest path from a report of a street light out in one community to a leaking water meter in another, Watchdog sometimes stumbles on an issue before a reader has a chance to point it out. In this case, "Druid" on the sign for Druid Hill Avenue at Bloom Street included an extra "L" in it. No other sign on the street was incorrectly spelled.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | March 12, 1995
David B. Reynolds is truly an unparalleled foreigner in these parts.That might seem a strange thing to say about a local actor who has been on every area stage since he broke in with the Children's Theatre of Annapolis nearly 15 years ago. But when you see the hilarious Mr. Reynolds as Charlie Baker in the new Chesapeake Music Hall production of Larry Shue's play "The Foreigner," you'll know what I mean.Brit Charlie Baker is such a bore that his own wife can't bear having him around -- even when she's on her death bed.On a quick trip to Georgia to visit an old army buddy, Charlie becomes so panic-stricken at the thought of having to make chit-chat with his fellow guests at Betty Meeks' broken-down hotel, that his friend passes him off as a foreigner who speaks and understands no English.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | January 7, 1992
Charlie Baker is one of those unhappy British chaps whose own wife finds him shatteringly and profoundly boring, even on her deathbed.On a quick getaway visit to the States to visit his old army buddy, Charlie becomes so panic-stricken at the thought of having to make conversation with the strangers on hand at Betty Meeks' Georgia resort that his friend passes him off as a non-English speaking foreigner incapable of understanding or communicating a word...
SPORTS
By Rich Scherr and Rich Scherr,Contributing Writer | May 26, 1993
FREDERICK -- There are a number of reasons the fourth-seeded Hammond baseball team dropped a heart-breaking 6-5 decision to top-seeded Rockville last night in the Class 2A state semifinals at McCurdy Field.Not the least of which was the Bears themselves.Rockville took advantage of six Hammond errors, scoring the winning run in the bottom of the seventh on an errant throw to third by catcher Robbie Laing, allowing Jeremy Kinsey, who had reached on an error to lead off the inning, to score.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,Contributing Writer | March 11, 1994
Imagine having to pretend you don't speak English, while around you people are plotting and believing you are none the wiser.This is the premise of the Carroll Players dinner theater production of "The Foreigner," a play by Larry Shue, at Frock's Sunnybrook Farm. The troupe has chosen a play that mixes humor with an important social message.In the show, two British soldiers, "Froggy" LeSuer, played by Dave Miller, and Charlie Baker, played by Tom Templeton, take a trip to Betty Meek's Fishing Lodge Resort in Tilgman County, Ga. Froggy is there to teach American soldiers about explosives.
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