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By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
After 15 years at the Charles Theatre , the Maryland Film Festival will be moving into new digs in May. The operators of the Charles, James “Buzz” Cusack and his daughter, Kathleen Cusack Lyon, chose not to rent their five-screen facility to the festival this year, film festival head Jed Dietz said. The 16 th festival, scheduled for May 7-11, will be held at spaces in the Maryland Institute College of Art, the University of Baltimore , the Walters Art Museum and the Windup Space on North Avenue.
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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
Grumblings seemed few as the 16th Maryland Film Festival wrapped up Sunday, having weathered a forced relocation to North Avenue and other nearby areas. "I've been really enjoying it," cinephile Greg Golinski said Saturday, about halfway through his planned 12-film visit to the festival. The event brought 50 feature films, 10 shorts programs, dozens of filmmakers and thousands of film lovers to Baltimore for the weekend. "Integrating it more into Station North, it's been fun," Golinski said of the move.
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FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | February 12, 1993
New this week, exclusively at the Charles Theatre: seats!Seats you can actually sit in! That caress your rear end and take the ache out of your backside. That do not jab, fold, spindle or mutilate you or collapse under your weight and deposit you on the floor. Yes: seats without a sense of humor. Just plain old . . . chairs!The legendary rep and art house on Charles Street is in the process of refurbishing its admittedly tacky and frequently broken 486 seats with new upper and lower cushions covered with a "virtually indestructible" blue weave called "Marquessa."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Sarah LaCorte, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2014
The 16th Maryland Film Festival began this week with cinephiles carefully mapping out their plans and cautiously optimistic that a move from the five-screen Charles Theatre to seven different locations would not crimp their style. "I thought it would, but this was so easy," said Sharon Knox, who came to the festival's Tent Village on North Avenue on Thursday to buy tickets for three films. "Maybe being on North Avenue is a little more convenient than being restricted to that little corner of Charles Street where the Charles is. " Overall ticket sales were up "double-digits" over two years ago, festival head Jed Dietz said, although they were still behind last year's record-setting pace, when a strong crop of films with local connections led to a substantial increase in overall attendance.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | February 5, 1998
The planned expansion of the Charles Theatre cleared its last financial hurdle yesterday after the city agreed to give a $79,000 grant toward construction of the movie house that will grow from one screen to five.The Board of Estimates unanimously approved the grant in hopes that the expanded theater will be an economic boon to surrounding neighborhoods that are beset with empty properties and crime."This will really help that block that is struggling now," saidBeverly Fuller, executive director of the Midtown Community Benefits District, a neighborhood organization that includes the theater.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1997
He was recently rated the No. 1 star in Hollywood history. He's probably had more books written about him than any other American movie star. He made snarls and lisps seem downright sexy.He's even been immortalized on a postage stamp.Which helps explains why tomorrow, Humphrey Bogart takes up a two-month stay at the Charles Theatre.Beginning with a showing of "The Petrified Forest" tomorrow and Monday, the Charles will be screening Bogart films every Saturday morning and Monday evening through Oct. 27. For fans, the 11-film festival offers a rare chance to see Bogie on the big screen, to see a larger-than-life character in the sort of larger-than-life setting he belongs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and By Sloane Brown,Special to the Sun | June 30, 2002
When up-and-coming Hollywood heartthrob Aaron Stanford makes it big, some Baltimore movie lovers can say they knew him when. Aaron was in town recently at a Charles Theatre preview screening of Tadpole for the benefit of the Maryland Film Festival. In the movie, the 20-something actor plays a 15-year-old interested in older women Sigourney Weaver and Bebe Neuwirth. Film Fest programming administrator Dan Krovich says, not only was the movie good, but so were some of the questions the audience of 200 asked Aaron and the film's director Gary Winnick, who was also at the screening.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2011
When Kevin Clash was a boy in Baltimore County, he'd watch TV mere inches from the screen and wish he could walk right into "Sesame Street. " It didn't take him long to get there. At 15, the kid from Turners Station became the regular puppeteer on a WMAR kids show. At 19, he performed as Cookie Monster in the Sesame Street float at the 1979 Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, and that night met his hero, Muppet creator Jim Henson. "Sesame Street" hired Clash in his early 20s. Before he turned 25, he took a gravel-throated red fur-ball and imbued him with a loving nature, a piping voice and a rapscallion innocence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | August 15, 1999
For a brief moment this summer, Baltimore filmgoers may have thought they were seeing things. The Charles Theatre, the venerable art house that had recently added four screens, was playing such big studio movies as "Summer of Sam," "South Park: Bigger, Longer and Uncut" and "Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me."Meanwhile, the 17-screen General Cinema megaplex in Owings Mills was showing "Limbo," the latest low-budget feature from independent filmmaker John Sayles.Was there something wrong with this picture?
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 28, 1999
Albert Maysles has never liked the term "cinema verite," even though he is credited with helping to invent it.Maysles, with his late brother David, used hand-held cameras, synchronous sound and no narration to create an intimate, urgent, occasionally frenetic style of filmmaking that came to be called "cinema verite" -- loosely translated as the cinema of truth. But Maysles has always preferred the term "direct cinema" to describe his work."People talk of the near-death experience as being so revelatory," said Albert Maysles from his Manhattan office during a phone conversation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2014
The 16 th Maryland Film Festival kicked off Wednesday night with a roster of short films and a crowd of optimistic film fans. "I heard from all my filmmaker friends that this is the friendliest festival to filmmakers, and it's obvious that is a true statement," said Annie Silverstein, whose short film, "Skunk," will be playing as part of a program of dramatic shorts on Thursday and Friday. The festival, which continues through Sunday, kicked off with its now-traditional Opening Night Shorts program at the Maryland Institute College of Art's Brown Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Kevin Brown knows opportunity when it shows up at his front door. When news broke this year that the annual Maryland Film Festival would be leaving its home at the Charles Theatre for a series of venues, including several near the restaurant he runs on North Avenue, he leapt into action - extending cafe hours, coming up with food specials, hiring a DJ to spin tunes outside his door. "We're going to make a million dollars here," predicted a thrilled (if perhaps a bit hyperbolic)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
Trust John Waters to never go for the easy choice. "Abuse of Weakness," the latest work from controversial French filmmaker Catherine Breillat, is Waters' pick for this year's Maryland Film Festival, set for May 7-11, largely in the Station North Arts District. The film, which is getting its Maryland premiere, stars Isabelle Huppert as a director who, after suffering a stroke, is victimized by a notorious con man. It is based on a similar incident that happened to Breillat, who spent five months in a hospital recovering from a 2004 stroke.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
Next month's Maryland Film Festival will feature the local debut of "Ping Pong Summer," writer-director Michael Tully's coming-of-age tale set in Ocean City in the 1980s and starring Susan Sarandon, Lea Thompson, John Hannah and Amy Sedaris. Tully's film, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January, was included in Wednesday's announcement of the first 10 movies scheduled for the festival, set to run May 7-11 at the Maryland Institute College of Art and other venues, mostly in the area of the Station North Arts and Entertainment District.
FEATURES
The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
We'll continue to update this list of cultural and commercial institutions shutting down or opening late. If you know of additional closings or delays, please note in the comments field. B&O Railroad Museum is closed. Baltimore County Public Library branches are closed. Charles Theatre is closed. Maryland Film Festival screenings for tonight at MICA ("It Felt Like Love") and AMC White Marsh ("Bad Words") are canceled. Maryland Zoo in Baltimore is closed.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
After 15 years at the Charles Theatre , the Maryland Film Festival will be moving into new digs in May. The operators of the Charles, James “Buzz” Cusack and his daughter, Kathleen Cusack Lyon, chose not to rent their five-screen facility to the festival this year, film festival head Jed Dietz said. The 16 th festival, scheduled for May 7-11, will be held at spaces in the Maryland Institute College of Art, the University of Baltimore , the Walters Art Museum and the Windup Space on North Avenue.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 11, 1999
Krzysztof Kieslowski died too young, at 54, in 1996. By then, the Polish director already had made an international name for himself with films such as "The Double Life of Veronique" (1991) and the "Red," "White" and "Blue" trilogy of 1993 and 1994.But "Dekalog," a 10-part film series Kieslowski directed for Polish television, was what first brought the director to the attention of audiences and critics. And it has rarely been screened in theaters since it was broadcast in 1988. Kieslowski completists have been forced to watch the most significant work of his career on videotapes of limited scope and quality.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2013
Matt Porterfield's new film, "I Used To Be Darker," has been a festival favorite abroad. But soon Baltimore will get the first wider-release peek. According to a statement, the Baltimore director's third film will have its national opening in Baltimore Sept. 27. Porterfield told us that Strand Releasing has agreed to let Baltimore get first dibs on the film, before New York and Los Angeles. The film is scheduled to open at The Charles Theatre. It also screened at the Maryland Film Festival in May. Porterfield, who won the Sondheim Artscape Prize in 2011, has garnered acclaim for his films "Hamilton" and "Putty Hill," both set and filmed in and around Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2013
A major step forward in the Senator Theatre's renovation could take place at Thursday's Liquor Board hearing. The board will vote on the Senator's application for a beer, wine and liquor restaurant license, and co-owner Kathleen Cusack Lyon says she feels confident the application will be approved. Lyon - who owns the Senator with her father and Charles Theatre owner James "Buzz" Cusack - says the Senator has the support of various community members and groups, including the Belvedere Improvement Association and Councilman Bill Henry, who says he plans to attend the Liquor Board hearing as a sign of support.
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