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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | December 9, 1993
The Charles Theater, for 14 1/2 years Baltimore's premiere art movie venue, won't be showing the Chinese film "Farewell My Concubine" this Christmas, as its schedule proclaims. Instead, it will be exhibiting a sadder reality: Farewell, my Baltimore.The theater, which has been leased and operated by Washingtonian David Levy since June 1979, will close its doors Sunday night and remain dark for at least several weeks as its owners struggle to find new operators."I am hopeful that it will not be dark very long," said Alan Shecter, chief operating partner of Bowling Inc., the Baltimore real estate firm that owns the theater and much of the 1700 block of N. Charles St. "There are a couple of commercial operators in the picture -- that is, local people who would operate the theater like David Levy did."
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NEWS
September 26, 2014
I want to thank The Baltimore Sun and Jacques Kelly for that wonderful obituary for my sister Vivienne Shub (Sept. 18). No one was closer to me than Vivi and I feel her loss most keenly. But as you brought together the many ways she worked her magic on the Baltimore theater scene, I had the sense that my grief was shared and that somehow made it more bearable. I was delighted when Vivi's son told me he looked up as he drove by the Charles Theater and saw Vivienne's name on the marquee.
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NEWS
By Alan Shecter | October 18, 1991
THE LEASE expired last February but wasn't renewed until this fall, after a year-long ordeal in which various taxing authorities tortured and very nearly closed the Charles Theater, Baltimore's midtown showcase of film art.Since 1979, the annual property tax on the theater has risen by 136 percent from $3,470 to this year's $8,177. During the same period, the "minor privilege tax" for the front entrance canopy rose by 153 percent from $1,175 to $2,973. Worst of all, the amusement tax, which was quintupled in 1988 from 1 percent to 5 percent, was doubled again last year to 10 percent of the ticket price, nearly crushing the theater's economic viability.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Timothy Dyson is leaving Bluegrass in South Baltimore, where he's been the executive chef for just about two years, to join the team at  Dooby's  in Mount Vernon. Dyson's first official day as executive chef at Dooby's is Tuesday, but he'll be helping with the transition at Bluegrass, he said. Antonio Rice will be taking over from Dyson with Lori Yanke taking over the restaurant's charcuterie program. Dyson, a veteran of Kali's Court and the Peabody Court Hotel, will be launching a new dinner menu at Dooby's on Aug. 21. Dyson's menu will have new sections of Asian-American bar bites, comfort eats and seasonal entrees -- things like chicken curry summer rolls, meatballs banh mi and a vegan-friendly quinoa bibim bowl.
NEWS
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | November 18, 1993
The last picture show at Baltimore's venerable Charles Theater may very well come in January.The repertory and art film house in the 1700 block of North Charles Street, a staple in city film culture for nearly 15 years, has fallen victim to a 25 percent decline in attendance from two years ago that threatens its existence.And although its owner won't say if the Charles is definitely closing, signs point to that ending. The theater hasn't paid rent in nine months. As of today, the Charles no longer will sell the discount ticket books that reduce prices for steady goers.
NEWS
October 17, 1997
ALL of a sudden, Baltimore's art movie business is exploding. The Senator Theater, on York Road, plans to add two screens to its 900-seat movie house. The Power Plant at the Inner Harbor is about to announce a cluster of eight screens as part of its entertainment mix. And the Charles Theater, near Penn Station, aims at building four new screens."When we get the movies we want to get, we can do pretty well. This expansion will put us in the position to get more of the movies that we want to get," explains James "Buzz" Cusack, one of the owners of the Charles.
NEWS
April 21, 1999
IT IS quite miraculous what imaginative architects can do. At the Charles Theater, thanks to stadium seating, they were able to cram four additional screens into the space where the Famous Ballroom used to be -- plus a concession area, restrooms and other amenities.A star-studded ribbon cutting today will celebrate the result of months of reconstruction. Guests will have five films to choose from, champagne, popcorn and live music.Over the next four days, the Charles will be among the locations used by the Maryland Film Festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2008
Tonight 8:30 p.m. -- Opening-night shorts program, MICA Brown Center Tomorrow 11 a.m. -- Shorts program: documentaries, Charles Theatre 4 11:30 a.m. -- I.O.U.S.A., Charles Theater 1 noon -- My Effortless Brilliance, Charles Theatre 5 1:30 p.m. -- Shorts program: comedy, Charles Theatre 3 1:30 p.m. -- Shorts program: narrative 2, Charles Theatre 4 2 p.m. -- Goliath, Charles Theatre 1 2:30 p.m. -- Profit Motive and the Whispering Wind, Charles Theatre 5 2:30 p.m. -- Black List, Charles Theater 2 3 p.m. -- Shorts program: on the edge, Charles Theatre 3 4 p.m. -- Shorts program: narrative 1, Charles Theatre 4 4:30 p.m. -- Song Sung Blue, Charles Theatre 5 4:30 p.m. -- Nights and Weekends, Charles Theatre 1 5 p.m. -- Low and Behold, Charles Theatre 2 5:30 p.m. -- Strictly Background, UB Student Center 5:30 p.m. -- Shorts program: narrative 3, Charles Theatre 3 5:30 p.m. -- Water Front, MICA Brown Center 6:30 p.m. -- Intimidad, Charles Theater 4 7 p.m. -- Listening Project, Charles Theatre 5 7 p.m. -- Story of Women (presented by John Waters)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2011
There is nothing definite, but there is in the works a gathering in memory of the restaurateur Morris Martick. The plans, in these early stages, would involve a mid-morning weekday gathering at the Charles theater, followed by a reception at the Metro Gallery. This would happen sometime in January, possibly sometime around Jan. 18, when Martick, who died last Friday, would have celebrated his 90th birthday. Details about a formal funeral service, if there is one at all, have not been made public.
FEATURES
By Beth Hannan and Beth Hannan,Staff Writer | December 20, 1993
Don't assume that the closing of the Charles Theater is just another example of today's crowded multiplex-at-the-mall movie environment squeezing out small theaters. To our readers, the Charles' closing is like losing a friend.All 16 callers to our Sundial poll expressed regret at the closing and shared some of their memories of the quirky art theater."I used to like the semi-cryptic birthday messages that the Charles would leave on its marquee," said Bob Beal. "My most vivid memory of the Charles was the night Stevie Ray Vaughan died in a plane crash."
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
Baltimore artist Carabella Sands is inspired by " mermaids, cats, decisions, force, loss, the vulnerability and power of nudity" and "smeared gender roles" Or, what she calls, "the scary parts of fairy tales. " Sands' show of 271 drawings and a few paintings opens at 7:30 p.m. tonight at the Charles Theater.  You can take home one of Sands' original works at the show's closing party on April 30.  But here's the twist -- you can't pick which one. Sands is selling $25 tickets for a raffle of sorts of her artwork.  She'll randomly award a drawing to each ticket holder at the closing party.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
The Senator Theatre and its adjoining small-plates restaurant, Bar Zini, will be authorized to sell alcohol when it reopens in the coming months, after a Baltimore licensing board voted Thursday to approve its application. The Rosebank theater, closed since April 2012, is undergoing more than $3 million in renovations, including the addition of the nearly 100-seat Mediterranean restaurant, according to co-owners Kathleen Cusack Lyon and her father, James "Buzz" Cusack. The theater will expand to four screens with room for 770 guests.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard
For The Baltimore Sun
| July 3, 2013
The 1700 block of North Charles Street, home to such institutions as the Club Charles and Charles Theater, is a logical home for a place like Lost City Diner. Its quirky atmosphere, friendly service and likable (if sometimes average) food are likely to make it a hit. The restaurant opened in August 2011 but closed only a few months later, in January 2012, for "kitchen renovations. " It finally reopened, with a new owner, on April first of this year. On a recent Wednesday evening, the diner was nearly empty at 6:30, but packed by 7:30.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
After a day in which they temporarily became waterfront businesses, shops and cafes on North Charles Street began reopening Thursday, when the river created by a massive water main break at 20th Street receded. While several blocks remained closed to vehicular traffic, pedestrians, bicyclists and the occasional skateboarder enjoyed the dry pavement and fewer speeding cars. About 450 moviegoers headed into the Charles Theater for a talk and screening with director Oliver Stone. Restaurants welcomed back the business they lost to Wednesday's gusher from a 60-inch, 90-year-old broken main.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2011
There is nothing definite, but there is in the works a gathering in memory of the restaurateur Morris Martick. The plans, in these early stages, would involve a mid-morning weekday gathering at the Charles theater, followed by a reception at the Metro Gallery. This would happen sometime in January, possibly sometime around Jan. 18, when Martick, who died last Friday, would have celebrated his 90th birthday. Details about a formal funeral service, if there is one at all, have not been made public.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2008
Tonight 8:30 p.m. -- Opening-night shorts program, MICA Brown Center Tomorrow 11 a.m. -- Shorts program: documentaries, Charles Theatre 4 11:30 a.m. -- I.O.U.S.A., Charles Theater 1 noon -- My Effortless Brilliance, Charles Theatre 5 1:30 p.m. -- Shorts program: comedy, Charles Theatre 3 1:30 p.m. -- Shorts program: narrative 2, Charles Theatre 4 2 p.m. -- Goliath, Charles Theatre 1 2:30 p.m. -- Profit Motive and the Whispering Wind, Charles Theatre 5 2:30 p.m. -- Black List, Charles Theater 2 3 p.m. -- Shorts program: on the edge, Charles Theatre 3 4 p.m. -- Shorts program: narrative 1, Charles Theatre 4 4:30 p.m. -- Song Sung Blue, Charles Theatre 5 4:30 p.m. -- Nights and Weekends, Charles Theatre 1 5 p.m. -- Low and Behold, Charles Theatre 2 5:30 p.m. -- Strictly Background, UB Student Center 5:30 p.m. -- Shorts program: narrative 3, Charles Theatre 3 5:30 p.m. -- Water Front, MICA Brown Center 6:30 p.m. -- Intimidad, Charles Theater 4 7 p.m. -- Listening Project, Charles Theatre 5 7 p.m. -- Story of Women (presented by John Waters)
ENTERTAINMENT
By From Staff Reports | May 5, 1995
Cinema Sundays at the Charles continues this weekend with the showing of an award-winning English film adapted from aplay about a crime that took place in a provincial town in France in the 1930s involving sisters, maids and a matron's murder.The Charles is contractually obligated not to release the name of the films it shows during the Cinema Sundays program.The film will be introduced by David Bergman, a Towson State University professor of English and a published poet, editor and critic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By From Staff Reports | May 19, 1995
Cinema Sundays at the Charles continues this weekend with the showing of a film from China, set in the 1920s and replete with a bartered bride, outlaws, a courageous servant and unrequited and requited love.The Charles is contractually obligated not to release the name of the films it shows during the Cinema Sundays program.The film will be introduced by Eddie Cockrell, a programmer with the American Film Institute in Washington, who currently runs a Sunday morning cinema club for the Smithsonian Associates.
NEWS
By Nicholas Leonhardt | September 2, 2004
ALL THAT glitters is not gold. Sometimes it's merely cracked asphalt. The barren, broken parking lot behind Penn Station in Baltimore may not appear to be a treasure, but it contains some of the most valuable yet undeveloped real estate along the Amtrak corridor. The Charles North Community Association proposes landscaping this property and building an amphitheater, bringing green space, a dog park and live entertainment to a block most people ignore. This pastoral gathering place not only would be a gem for the immediate neighborhood but would also attract young people seeking music and theater.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker and Michael Olesker,Sun Staff | June 29, 2003
ON CHARLES Street, ghosts happily haunt the landscape. Joy Martin, owner of the Club Charles and The Zodiac next door, insists they hang around her establishments for old time's sake. Who could argue with her? Outside Martin's window, half a block away on the new bridge outside the Pennsylvania Railroad Station last week, there was life where even ghosts formerly stayed away. They staged a block party when they reopened Charles Street. Now you can drive up the city's main north-south corridor to your heart's content.
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