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By Jeff Pelline and Jeff Pelline,San Francisco Chronicle | March 15, 1992
While rank-and-file employees don't receive as many perquisites as chief executives -- or members of the House of Representatives, for that matter -- many get benefits that seem impressive in these financially difficult times.Airline employees receive free or cheap plane tickets. Utility workers get discounts on their telephone and energy bills. Retail clerks save money on clothing and stereos. Bank employees get free checking accounts and low-interest loans. These perks can save an employee hundreds and even thousands of dollars annually, and in many cases they are extended to retired employees as well.
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BUSINESS
June 16, 2009
Monday downturn raises questions about market CHICAGO - The stock market's 187-point nose dive Monday abruptly ended the Dow's brief foray into positive territory for 2009, leaving stock-watchers to ponder whether an unexpectedly strong spring rally will survive into summer. Plenty of evidence suggests the bull market may be done, or at least out of momentum, after 14 weeks on the upswing. The economy remains fragile, investors are increasingly worried about the prospect of rising interest rates, gas prices are climbing again, and a market correction was probably overdue.
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BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | March 17, 2000
HAVE you planned adequately for your later years? If not, talk to your adviser about the "new longevity." "People are now living much longer in retirement," says Michael Stein, author of "The Prosperous Retirement." "If retirees haven't planned for extra years by investing more and retiring later, they risk draining their retirement nest egg before death. People must plan to live longer than they think." "Treasury bond prices may rise as the government reduces the debt. Excellent values are bonds that have three- to seven-year maturities.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Newspapers | May 24, 2009
It is the year of living cautiously for investors with individual retirement accounts. The economic problems that felled investments and job security have turned many formerly eager IRA investors into tentative souls. "We've seen a slight increase of a few hundred dollars per account in the IRA contributions made in 2009 compared to last year, which is the good news," said Ken Hevert, vice president of retirement savings products for Fidelity Investments. "However, we've also seen an overall decrease in the number of people actually making those IRA contributions."
BUSINESS
By Opinions on stocks offered by investment experts.Compiled by Steve Halpern for Knight Ridder | May 29, 1991
Bear Stearns"Bear Stearns (BSC, NYSE, around $15) recently reported quarterly earnings of 60 cents a share, double the amount earned in the year-earlier period," says Alison Deans of Smith Barney."
BUSINESS
January 16, 2005
A weekly briefing on the economic calendar Event of the week Release Wednesday of the Consumer Price Index for December. November figures were up 0.2 percent, and Briefing.com estimates it to rise 0.1 percent in December. Tuesday Earnings reports: 3M, Abbott Laboratories, Ameritrade, Bank of America, Citigroup, Fifth Third, State Street, US Bancorp, Wells Fargo, Advanced Micro Devices, IBM, Motorola, Yahoo Wednesday Consumer Price Index for December; housing starts and building permits for December, Fed's beige book Earnings reports: CIT Group, General Motors, JPMorgan Chase, Legg Mason, Lucent, Mellon Financial, Merrill Lynch, Northern Trust, Northwest Airlines, Southwest Arlines, Wachovia, AMR Corp.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | July 17, 1996
Because of inaccurate information supplied to The Sun, a figure for redemptions and transfers from T. Rowe Price Associates Inc.'s mutual funds in an article in yesterday's editions was inaccurate. The actual figure was roughly $40 million, or 0.1 percent of the firm's mutual fund assets.The Sun regrets the error.Baltimore-area investors hung tough for the most part yesterday, despite Wall Street's seesaw ride that at one point saw the Dow Jones industrial average drop more than 160 points.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 4, 2005
Move over, Two-Buck Chuck, as the Charles Shaw wines sold by Trader Joe's are called. Here comes another Chuck, seeking a lot more than a couple of dollars. This Chuck is Chuck Schwab, aka Charles R. Schwab, who is the centerpiece of a campaign under way by the brokerage he founded. The campaign, for the Charles Schwab & Co. unit of Charles Schwab Corp., has a budget that would buy an avid oenophile about 17.5 million bottles of Two-Buck Chuck. The campaign is about Schwab even though he is not featured in the advertising, much as ads for the KFC restaurant chain are intended to evoke Col. Harland Sanders without his actually appearing.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2008
Nation : Courts Interstate Bakeries pursues its own plan Interstate Bakeries Corp., which makes Wonder Bread, said yesterday that it would proceed with a bankruptcy court hearing Jan. 29 to request creditor approval for its plan. Tuesday's midnight deadline for outside proposals passed without any filings from Yucaipa, an investment firm lead by billionaire Ron Burkle, which last month submitted a preliminary proposal to buy Interstate Bakeries, valuing it at $580 million. The proposal did not provide details of a reorganization plan.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1997
New positionsOrzechowski promoted to CFO at AlcoreAlcore Inc. announced the selection of Richard Orzechowski as chief financial officer. Before joining the Belcamp-based subsidiary of Lunn Industries in 1995 as controller, he was a senior financial manager with Westinghouse Electric Corp., serving as controller in various domestic and international operations. He resides in Ellicott City.Charles Schwab promotes AskewCharles Schwab & Co. named Darryl Askew, of its Towson office, an investment specialist.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | April 15, 2009
It's a shame the rest of American finance can't clean itself up like Legg Mason did. If Wall Street could confess to terrible losses and sweep them out the door the way the big Baltimore money manager did, we might be closer to ending the recession. Stage by painful stage, Legg bailed out its money-market customers for a total of $2.3 billion in losses on paper linked to mortgages and other funky bets. The final junk got dumped into the recycling bin two weeks ago, when Legg disposed of $300 million in debt issued by a "structured investment vehicle" for $49 million - a paltry 16 cents on the dollar.
BUSINESS
By MarketWatch | March 21, 2008
WASHINGTON -- With today's turmoil in the housing market, hitting up mom and dad for a down payment might be a young buyer's best route to homeownership. It's hard for the younger generation to become first-time homebuyers today as they try to juggle numerous financial responsibilities, experts say. "Stakes are higher," says Carrie Schwab Pomerantz, chief strategist of consumer education with Charles Schwab & Co. "Today, young people are solely responsible for their retirement. A lot of young people are coming out of college with high levels of debt."
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | March 14, 2008
Almost everything seems to be going wrong for the American economy at once. People are buying less, but most things are costing more. Mortgage rates are rising, the dollar is falling and prices of key commodities such as oil are leaping from one record high to the next. Yesterday, the dollar plumbed new lows against the Japanese yen, the euro and other major currencies; the price of an ounce of gold rose above $1,000 for the first time, and lenders raised home loan rates once again. Government figures showed retail sales fell in February as consumers cut back on cars, furniture and electronics.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2008
Nation : Courts Interstate Bakeries pursues its own plan Interstate Bakeries Corp., which makes Wonder Bread, said yesterday that it would proceed with a bankruptcy court hearing Jan. 29 to request creditor approval for its plan. Tuesday's midnight deadline for outside proposals passed without any filings from Yucaipa, an investment firm lead by billionaire Ron Burkle, which last month submitted a preliminary proposal to buy Interstate Bakeries, valuing it at $580 million. The proposal did not provide details of a reorganization plan.
BUSINESS
By Carolyn Bigda and Carolyn Bigda,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | August 26, 2007
It used to be that financial services firms focused most of their attention on people who had already accumulated wealth. Now, though, much younger age groups are being embraced, even lauded. Consider this statement from one brokerage: "Gen X-ers ... have actually done a better job of planning for a financially secure retirement than their elders, the boomers." There are a few reasons for the sudden courtship. One reason is that financial advisers say that today's twenty- to fortysomethings face a far more complex financial landscape than their parents did. With pensions dwindling as a standard benefit, for example, workers are left on their own to save and invest for retirement.
BUSINESS
By Gail MarksJarvis and Gail MarksJarvis,Chicago Tribune | June 3, 2007
If you had listened to Wall Street's sloganeers and decided to "sell in May and go away," you're probably kicking yourself now. You would have missed out on a rally that lifted the blue-chip Dow Jones industrial average and the Russell 2000 small-cap index to record highs last week. In fact, the benchmark Standard & Poor's 500 index - for the first time in seven years - finally regained what it lost when the technology bubble burst in 2000, setting its own closing record. Of course, there is still plenty of time for the old adage to prove right this summer.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1999
Aether Systems Inc. of Owings Mills said yesterday that it has won a two-year contract to provide its wireless data communications systems to Charles Schwab & Co. Inc., one of the nation's largest financial-services companies.San Francisco-based Schwab will use Aether's technology in its new wireless trading service, which is expected to be introduced by the end of this year. Aether will provide software and customer support for the venture.With the service, Schwab customers would be able to check their accounts and carry out trades using small electronic devices such as Palm Pilots, two-way pagers, hand-held computers and certain telephones.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1998
After languishing for years, the Individual Retirement Account has suddenly become the hottest investment vehicle around.Many investors wrote it off after Congress, more than a decade ago, restricted its most compelling feature: the tax-deductible contribution.But now, brokerage houses and mutual fund companies are being blitzed with calls from people who want information about IRAs -- especially the new Roth IRA."It is ridiculous, every other phone call is about the Roth IRA," said Morry A. Zolet, senior vice president of investments at Ferris, Baker Watts Inc. in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Janet Kidd Stewart and Janet Kidd Stewart,Tribune Media Services | May 27, 2007
If you've been socking away money in a fee-based brokerage account, you may be one of about 1 million customers facing some changes in the coming months. For retirement savers, it represents a good opportunity to evaluate exactly what advice you're receiving as you accumulate a nest egg. The Securities and Exchange Commission recently decided not to challenge a federal appellate court ruling that overturned an exemption to the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, which had allowed fee-based brokers (as opposed to those working solely on per-trade commissions)
BUSINESS
By CAROLYN BIGDA and CAROLYN BIGDA,Chicago Tribune | April 22, 2007
Not earning a competitive yield on your cash? A government agency is taking steps to show what you're missing. Last month, the Securities and Exchange Commission introduced a proposal that would require brokerage firms to better explain cash account options and the yields paid on them. Investors often accumulate cash in a brokerage account after, say, selling a stock or receiving a dividend payment. Periodically, the broker "sweeps" that cash into a savings vehicle (money moved this way is often referred to as sweep cash)
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