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NEWS
June 20, 2004
Jackie Paris, 79, a jazz vocalist who toured with Charlie Parker and was said to be one of the favorite singers of Ella Fitzgerald and comedian Lenny Bruce, died Thursday in Manhattan of complications of bone cancer. He worked with Lionel Hampton and Charles Mingus and was the first to sing the lyrics to Thelonious Monk's "'Round Midnight." Later, he taught master classes and gave private lessons while continuing to record and perform.
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NEWS
June 20, 2004
Jackie Paris, 79, a jazz vocalist who toured with Charlie Parker and was said to be one of the favorite singers of Ella Fitzgerald and comedian Lenny Bruce, died Thursday in Manhattan of complications of bone cancer. He worked with Lionel Hampton and Charles Mingus and was the first to sing the lyrics to Thelonious Monk's "'Round Midnight." Later, he taught master classes and gave private lessons while continuing to record and perform.
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NEWS
March 18, 1997
Gail Davis, 71, an actress best known for her role as * *TC gun-toting rancher in the popular 1950s television series "Annie Oakley," died of cancer Saturday in Burbank, Calif.Joseph Fuchs, 97, a violinist and teacher whose recordings of Beethoven piano trios with pianist Eugene Istomin and cellist Pablo Casals are timeless testimonials to his musicality, died Friday in New York.Jurek Becker, 59, a Polish-born author who survived Nazi concentration camps to write "Jakob, the Liar" and other award-winning books in German, died Friday of cancer.
NEWS
March 18, 1997
Gail Davis, 71, an actress best known for her role as * *TC gun-toting rancher in the popular 1950s television series "Annie Oakley," died of cancer Saturday in Burbank, Calif.Joseph Fuchs, 97, a violinist and teacher whose recordings of Beethoven piano trios with pianist Eugene Istomin and cellist Pablo Casals are timeless testimonials to his musicality, died Friday in New York.Jurek Becker, 59, a Polish-born author who survived Nazi concentration camps to write "Jakob, the Liar" and other award-winning books in German, died Friday of cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2012
Fans of Sunday brunch at Clementine at the Creative Alliance have more to choose from. New brunch options include oatnut French toast with caramelized bananas and maple syrup, grilled center cut Duroc pork chop with poached eggs, gravy and toast; pork belly with potato salad or hominy and, lastly, a wild mushroom omelet with arugula and feta. You can see the full menu here . Meanwhile, Jack Moore, aka "El Suprimo" is coming back on Dec. 27 to spin soul jazz. Expect very deep cuts off many rare and classic LPs from Moore's extensive private record collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | July 5, 2007
Hometown -- Smithsburg Current members --Justin Kalk, vocals and guitar; Steve Britton, bass and vocals; Lincoln Nesto, drums Founded in --2004 Style --pop rock Influenced by --Jimi Hendrix, the Beatles, Bob Dylan, Miles Davis, Charles Mingus Notable --Blue Sky Traffic definitely gets around. The band recorded its first full-length album, A Beautiful Girl, in Nashville and Maryland. It also plays live with local hip-hop group the Pham. Quotable --"It's kind of an album that's like the best of all of our older stuff for the last three years," Kalk said.
NEWS
April 8, 1999
Dr. Mary D. Ainsworth, 85, a developmental psychologist whose work revolutionized the understanding of the bond between mothers and infants, died March 21 in Charlottesville, Va.Her research contributed significantly to attachment theory, which emphasizes the importance of intimate human relationships, or attachments, in shaping children's development.Red Norvo, 91, who performed with such greats as Charles Mingus and Frank Sinatra and is credited with introducing the xylophone to jazz, died Tuesday in Santa Monica, Calif.
NEWS
February 16, 1999
William T. Fields, 52, founder of the telecommunications company that evolved into industry giant MCI-WorldCom, died Saturday of pancreatic cancer in Tupelo, Miss. Mr. Fields was best known for his role in founding Long Distance Discount Service in June 1984. He was one of nine original investors in the company, which took advantage of AT&T's divestiture of its Bell companies in the early 1980s.Bradford Grow, 89, retired pioneer of naval aviation and decorated veteran of the Guadalcanal campaign, died Thursday in O'Fallon, Ill. He was a retired rear admiral.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. CONSIDINE | May 6, 1999
The Cuban father of salsa If you want to get a real taste of Cuba this week, forget baseball. Instead, head down to the Kennedy Center's Eisenhower Theater on Friday to catch Cachao. A living legend in salsa circles, Cachao -- born Israel Lopez in Havana 80 years ago -- is the original Mambo King. After all, he and his brother, Orestes, are generally credited with having invented the form, which was first recorded on their 1939 hit, "Mambo." Since then, the bassist and composer has built a reputation comparable to that of Charles Mingus, being both a soloist and bandleader of unmatched ability.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2003
Parents and children alike remember reading Maurice Sendak's Where the Wild Things Are. After an evening of mischief, Max was "sent to bed without eating anything. That very night in Max's room a forest grew and grew and grew until his ceiling hung with vines and the walls became the world all around and an ocean tumbled by with a private boat for Max and he sailed off through night and day and in and out of weeks and almost over a year to where the wild things are." Philadelphia's Rosenbach Museum and Library hosts the exhibit Let the Wild Rumpus Start!
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 24, 2003
Good musicians - like good audiences - never tire of new experiences. Clarinetist Edward Palanker is a case in point. This 40-year veteran of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and 12-year veteran of the Peabody Institute faculty spiced his concert Wednesday night at Peabody with a good deal of fresh music. A trio by Mozart and a rhapsody by Debussy were the only "standards" on the program; the rest, including a sonatina by Martinu and a refashioning of some Bartok dances, was decidedly novel, and rewarding.
NEWS
January 8, 1993
Some lovers of traditional jazz and swing never quite forgave Dizzy Gillespie for his role in developing the dissonant style of be-bop.Louis Armstrong, for example, accused the rival trumpeter of simply playing wrong notes. But few musicians in the relatively short history of jazz showed such an unfettered stylistic versatility and creative vitality as Gillespie, who died Wednesday at the age of 75."Watching him was like watching a magician," singer Joe Williams said about Dizzy's mastery of a stilted trumpet and his humorous clowning on stages throughout the world.
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