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By Luke Broadwater | April 19, 2011
On weekday mornings, I'll post the most controversial, shocking and (of course) ridiculous stories for your reading pleasure. That way, when you walk into work, you'll be the master of witty conversation. National  • Financial smackdown! Actually, our country's reckless spending is not at all funny -- S&P rates U.S. "negative" on deb t. (Financial Times)  • Congressman was ticking debt clock installed on congressional floor. (Daily Caller)  • Poll: Trump ain't beating Obam a. (Rasmussen Reports)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | April 19, 2011
On weekday mornings, I'll post the most controversial, shocking and (of course) ridiculous stories for your reading pleasure. That way, when you walk into work, you'll be the master of witty conversation. National  • Financial smackdown! Actually, our country's reckless spending is not at all funny -- S&P rates U.S. "negative" on deb t. (Financial Times)  • Congressman was ticking debt clock installed on congressional floor. (Daily Caller)  • Poll: Trump ain't beating Obam a. (Rasmussen Reports)
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FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1996
Just when you thought he had disappeared, Gil Griggs surfaces again. The rascally Colt "Super Fan" of days gone by retired to Monkton and quietly opened a small auction house specializing in valuable documents.But Gil Griggs can't help but be in the middle of another story.He was minding his own business last month, the business of holding an auction. He had mailed out his "Signature House" catalog, which is stockpiled with Civil War documents, presidential notes and macabre fare: Letters from James Earl Ray, artwork by mass murderer John Wayne Gacy and more than two dozen letters, drawings and "comments" from Charles Manson, imprisoned for the 1969 murder of actress Sharon Tate and others.
NEWS
June 21, 2006
Charles Herman Older, 88, the Los Angeles Superior Court judge who presided over the murder trial of Charles Manson, died Saturday of complications from a fall, said his longtime friend and former law partner, Edward Cazier. Judge Older had been on the bench only a few years when he was handed the highly publicized case. Manson and three of his followers - Susan Atkins, Patricia Krenwinkel and Leslie Van Houten - were tried for the 1969 cult killings of actress Sharon Tate, Leno and Rosemary La Bianca and four others.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | December 3, 1993
Does the thought of Charles Manson's making money off the new Guns N' Roses album turn your stomach?That was the reaction many in the music business had upon hearing that the bonus track on Guns N' Roses' new album, "The Spaghetti Incident?" was a version of "Look At Your Game, Girl" -- a song first recorded by Manson. In fact, the album had barely been in record stores a week before law-enforcement and victims-rights groups began expressing outrage.Even David Geffen, head of the entertainment company that released the album, was appalled.
NEWS
June 21, 2006
Charles Herman Older, 88, the Los Angeles Superior Court judge who presided over the murder trial of Charles Manson, died Saturday of complications from a fall, said his longtime friend and former law partner, Edward Cazier. Judge Older had been on the bench only a few years when he was handed the highly publicized case. Manson and three of his followers - Susan Atkins, Patricia Krenwinkel and Leslie Van Houten - were tried for the 1969 cult killings of actress Sharon Tate, Leno and Rosemary La Bianca and four others.
NEWS
January 19, 1997
Clyde Tombaugh, 90, the astronomer who discovered the planet Pluto before he had a college degree, died Friday at his home in Mesilla Park, N.M. He retired in 1973 as an astronomy professor at New Mexico State University, where he founded the research astronomy department.Tombaugh discovered Pluto, the ninth planet from the sun, in 1930 when he was 24.Theo Wilson, a journalist whose courtroom coverage of cases from Sam Sheppard to John DeLorean made her the dean of America's trial reporters, died in Los Angeles early Friday of a cerebral hemorrhage.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | February 18, 1994
Don't think Gilbert Gottfried gets excited about doing comedy club appearances."It always feels like too many," he responds, when asked how many club dates he performs a year.Is stand-up comedy that grueling?"Oh yeah, it can be at times. But I guess that lumberjacks work harder, so . . ." says the comic whose performing persona seems perpetually dour -- even when in the form of a nasty animated parrot such as Iago, whose voice he supplied in the film "Aladdin."Actually, says Mr. Gottfried in a telephone interview in advance of four shows this weekend at the Comedy Cabaret in Fells Point, "I think I'm hated by young and old alike.
NEWS
By Jim Clark | August 10, 1998
ON THIS date in 1776, "E. Pluribus Unum" became the official U.S. motto. It means "one from many." It comes from the poem "Moretum." At the time, the phrase appeared on the cover of Gentleman's Magazine and was well-known in the colonies. It was used on the Great Seal of the United States.In 1787, Wolfgang Mozart completed one of his most famous compositions, "A Little Night Music."In 1779, Louis XVI of France freed the last remaining serfs on royal land.In 1821, Missouri was admitted to the Union as the 24th state.
NEWS
May 24, 2005
Thurl Ravenscroft, 91, whose voice was known worldwide through his work in movies, television and at Disneyland -- and especially as Tony the Tiger -- died of prostate cancer Sunday in Santa Ana, Calif. At Disneyland, Pirates of the Caribbean, the Haunted Mansion and the Enchanted Tiki Room were all graced by Mr. Ravenscroft's pliable, unusual voice, as were the Disney animated movies Cinderella, Dumbo and Lady and the Tramp. "Disneyland wouldn't have been, and wouldn't be, the same without him," said former park President Jack Lindquist.
NEWS
May 24, 2005
Thurl Ravenscroft, 91, whose voice was known worldwide through his work in movies, television and at Disneyland -- and especially as Tony the Tiger -- died of prostate cancer Sunday in Santa Ana, Calif. At Disneyland, Pirates of the Caribbean, the Haunted Mansion and the Enchanted Tiki Room were all graced by Mr. Ravenscroft's pliable, unusual voice, as were the Disney animated movies Cinderella, Dumbo and Lady and the Tramp. "Disneyland wouldn't have been, and wouldn't be, the same without him," said former park President Jack Lindquist.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 1, 2004
As the camera pans a bloody tableau of death in the wake of a suicide bus bombing, a young man is heard in voiceover saying, "There is no fear. Just before I blow myself up, I surrender to God. There is no pain. I am blown to pieces. I turn into pieces, and I feel no pain." Welcome to the mind of the suicide terrorist as explored tonight in "Suicide Bombers," which launches the third season of the Wide Angle documentary series on PBS. The mission of Wide Angle is to go behind the headlines and soundbites of international news coverage to offer the kind of context and understanding not likely to be found elsewhere on television.
NEWS
By Faye Fiore and Shweta Govindarajan and Faye Fiore and Shweta Govindarajan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 18, 2003
WASHINGTON - A federal judge heard testimony yesterday asking that John Hinckley Jr., the man who tried to assassinate President Reagan, be permitted to leave the psychiatric hospital where he has been held for 21 years for unsupervised visits with his parents. "The unanimous opinion of the experts is that he's not dangerous," attorney Barry Levine told U.S. District Judge Paul Friedman, arguing that 48-year-old Hinckley's mental illness is largely in remission. The move is the latest in a series of requests for conditional release filed by Hinckley since he was found not guilty by reason of insanity of shooting Reagan and three others in front of the Washington Hilton Hotel on March 30, 1981.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1999
When it comes to recalling the 1960s, Randall Miller, writing from Bethany Beach, has a theory. "Judy Collins has said at almost all her concerts I have seen, `Anyone who remembers the '60s wasn't there.' 'Nuff said." Well, not quite. Some '60s memories may be lost in a hallucinatory haze or exorcised as a way of coping with the assassinations, riots and war that dominated the decade, but plenty of Sun readers recalled plenty. Responding to our request to share memories of the '60s, many of you wrote passionately of a decade that stretched from grandfatherly Ike to Tricky Dick, from Alan Shepard's 15 minutes in space to Neil Armstrong's footprints on the moon.
NEWS
By Jim Clark | August 10, 1998
ON THIS date in 1776, "E. Pluribus Unum" became the official U.S. motto. It means "one from many." It comes from the poem "Moretum." At the time, the phrase appeared on the cover of Gentleman's Magazine and was well-known in the colonies. It was used on the Great Seal of the United States.In 1787, Wolfgang Mozart completed one of his most famous compositions, "A Little Night Music."In 1779, Louis XVI of France freed the last remaining serfs on royal land.In 1821, Missouri was admitted to the Union as the 24th state.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder /Tribune | August 2, 1998
Today I have an extremely important topic to discuss with you, but before I decide what it is, I need to "set the record straight" on something:In a recent column, I made a statement that turned out to be inaccurate. Yes. Although the error was corrected by a few alert editors, many newspapers, tragically, did not catch it.My statement was that Gleem toothpaste used to have an ingredient called "Gardol," which created an Invisible Protective Shield that deflected baseballs. This is simply not true.
NEWS
By Faye Fiore and Shweta Govindarajan and Faye Fiore and Shweta Govindarajan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 18, 2003
WASHINGTON - A federal judge heard testimony yesterday asking that John Hinckley Jr., the man who tried to assassinate President Reagan, be permitted to leave the psychiatric hospital where he has been held for 21 years for unsupervised visits with his parents. "The unanimous opinion of the experts is that he's not dangerous," attorney Barry Levine told U.S. District Judge Paul Friedman, arguing that 48-year-old Hinckley's mental illness is largely in remission. The move is the latest in a series of requests for conditional release filed by Hinckley since he was found not guilty by reason of insanity of shooting Reagan and three others in front of the Washington Hilton Hotel on March 30, 1981.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | May 16, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The shock-rocker with the nom de grunge "Marilyn Manson" blew through Washington over Mother's Day weekend.His band's "act" contains the usual outrages, from blasphemy (he ordered the playing of Christian hymns in advance of his show during which he tore the Bible into pieces), to pierced body parts in the band and audience, lyrics about mutilation, sodomy and death, T-shirts saying "kill your parents," middle finger-waving and chants of "We love hate! We hate love!"No surprises there.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | May 16, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The shock-rocker with the nom de grunge "Marilyn Manson" blew through Washington over Mother's Day weekend.His band's "act" contains the usual outrages, from blasphemy (he ordered the playing of Christian hymns in advance of his show during which he tore the Bible into pieces), to pierced body parts in the band and audience, lyrics about mutilation, sodomy and death, T-shirts saying "kill your parents," middle finger-waving and chants of "We love hate! We hate love!"No surprises there.
NEWS
January 19, 1997
Clyde Tombaugh, 90, the astronomer who discovered the planet Pluto before he had a college degree, died Friday at his home in Mesilla Park, N.M. He retired in 1973 as an astronomy professor at New Mexico State University, where he founded the research astronomy department.Tombaugh discovered Pluto, the ninth planet from the sun, in 1930 when he was 24.Theo Wilson, a journalist whose courtroom coverage of cases from Sam Sheppard to John DeLorean made her the dean of America's trial reporters, died in Los Angeles early Friday of a cerebral hemorrhage.
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