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FEATURES
May 12, 2008
May 12 1932 The body of Charles Lindbergh Jr., the kidnapped son of Charles and Anne Lindbergh, was found in a wooded area near Hopewell, N.J. 1943 During World War II, Axis forces in North Africa surrendered.
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NEWS
By Louise Vest | October 22, 2013
50 Years Ago Buttonholed  "Opens on Main Street  "Mrs. Juantia Mcintosh announces the opening of a Dressmaking and Altering shop at 149 Main Street.  Sewing will be the capable hands of Mrs. Ruth Botts who had her own shop for an exclusive clientele in Jamaica and more recently worked in Baltimore. "Mrs. Botts will not only make dresses from patterns but can sketch original designs for those who just 'have an idea' of a special gown they would like to have, and create from the sketch.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 15, 2001
A musical retelling of Lindbergh ordeal Anne Morrow Lindbergh's death last week brought the 1932 kidnapping and murder of her infant son, Charles Lindbergh Jr., back into the news. And a new musical about that event, "Lindbergh Baby Kidnapped," will make its world premiere at the Theatre Project tomorrow. Written by New York composer, lyricist and librettist Kenneth Allen Vega, the multimedia musical features a cast of nine re-enacting events ranging from the 1932 kidnapping to the 1936 execution of convicted kidnapper Bruno Richard Hauptmann.
FEATURES
May 12, 2008
May 12 1932 The body of Charles Lindbergh Jr., the kidnapped son of Charles and Anne Lindbergh, was found in a wooded area near Hopewell, N.J. 1943 During World War II, Axis forces in North Africa surrendered.
NEWS
July 5, 1997
GREAT ACTORS never appear to be acting. Jimmy Stewart so comfortably played his roles that movie audiences could easily convince themselves that he really was Jefferson Smith ("Mr. Smith Goes to Washington") or George Bailey ("It's a Wonderful Life") or Charles Lindbergh ("The Spirit of St. Louis") or Elwood P. Dowd ("Harvey"). Once Mr. Stewart appeared on the screen with his western Pennsylvania drawl and occasional stammer, no matter the scene or subject, the audience could relate.As distinctive as was this tall man with the immediately recognized voice, he had the uncanny ability to make people see him as one of their own. He was the quintessential American, whether playing a cowboy, a baseball player, a musician, a reporter, or an amiable imbiber whose best friend is an invisible 6-foot rabbit.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,special to the sun | April 30, 2008
In Colonial Players' current offering of the play Hauptmann, a case can be made to find the Annapolis troupe guilty of producing riveting courtroom drama. Set in 1936, the year of Bruno Hauptmann's execution after being tried and found guilty of the kidnapping and killing of the 20-month-old infant son of American hero Charles Lindbergh and his wife Anne Morrow Lindbergh, Hauptmann presents a fair-minded account of the actual proceedings while capturing the sensationalism, prejudices and celebrity worship of the era. In the program notes, Colonial Players director Beth Terranova writes that "Hauptmann's trial triggered the mass media age in trial coverage because of the nature of the crime and the accessibility of information surrounding the case."
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | October 13, 2007
The construction fences are beginning to come down around Cathedral Street's old Alcazar Ballroom as the Baltimore School for the Arts completes its renewal of this complex of Baltimore treasures. For months now, an adjoining Cathedral Street double-width brownstone has been architecturally knitted into the Alcazar. The old Alcazar possesses a curious social pedigree. The word Alcazar is Spanish for palace or fortress, based upon an Arab word.
NEWS
By Louise Vest | October 22, 2013
50 Years Ago Buttonholed  "Opens on Main Street  "Mrs. Juantia Mcintosh announces the opening of a Dressmaking and Altering shop at 149 Main Street.  Sewing will be the capable hands of Mrs. Ruth Botts who had her own shop for an exclusive clientele in Jamaica and more recently worked in Baltimore. "Mrs. Botts will not only make dresses from patterns but can sketch original designs for those who just 'have an idea' of a special gown they would like to have, and create from the sketch.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN REPORTER | March 5, 2007
John Kenneth Wenderoth, a retired aviation quality control worker, died of heart failure Wednesday at Glen Meadows retirement community in Glen Arm. The former Baldwin resident was 93. Mr. Wenderoth was born in Baltimore and raised in Rosedale and Essex. After graduating from Sparrows Point High School in 1929, he went to work at the old Glenn L. Martin Co. plant in Middle River and stayed when it became Martin Marietta Corp. He retired in 1967 after his division was sold to Teledyne Energy Systems in Hunt Valley.
NEWS
By The Washington Post | April 29, 2009
FRANKIE MANNING, 94 A pioneer of the Lindy Hop Frankie "Musclehead" Manning, a Harlem dancer and Tony Award-winning choreographer widely celebrated as one of the pioneers of the Lindy Hop, an acrobatic swing dance style of the 1930s and 1940s, died Monday in New York City. His nickname developed from the chants of dancers, "Go, Musclehead, go!" watching Mr. Manning's closely cropped head glisten with sweat as he kicked and spun himself, and his partners, into human propellers. The dance reportedly owed its name to transAtlantic aviator Charles Lindbergh, when one Savoy dancer told an inquiring reporter, "We flyin' like Lindy!"
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,special to the sun | April 30, 2008
In Colonial Players' current offering of the play Hauptmann, a case can be made to find the Annapolis troupe guilty of producing riveting courtroom drama. Set in 1936, the year of Bruno Hauptmann's execution after being tried and found guilty of the kidnapping and killing of the 20-month-old infant son of American hero Charles Lindbergh and his wife Anne Morrow Lindbergh, Hauptmann presents a fair-minded account of the actual proceedings while capturing the sensationalism, prejudices and celebrity worship of the era. In the program notes, Colonial Players director Beth Terranova writes that "Hauptmann's trial triggered the mass media age in trial coverage because of the nature of the crime and the accessibility of information surrounding the case."
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | October 13, 2007
The construction fences are beginning to come down around Cathedral Street's old Alcazar Ballroom as the Baltimore School for the Arts completes its renewal of this complex of Baltimore treasures. For months now, an adjoining Cathedral Street double-width brownstone has been architecturally knitted into the Alcazar. The old Alcazar possesses a curious social pedigree. The word Alcazar is Spanish for palace or fortress, based upon an Arab word.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN REPORTER | March 5, 2007
John Kenneth Wenderoth, a retired aviation quality control worker, died of heart failure Wednesday at Glen Meadows retirement community in Glen Arm. The former Baldwin resident was 93. Mr. Wenderoth was born in Baltimore and raised in Rosedale and Essex. After graduating from Sparrows Point High School in 1929, he went to work at the old Glenn L. Martin Co. plant in Middle River and stayed when it became Martin Marietta Corp. He retired in 1967 after his division was sold to Teledyne Energy Systems in Hunt Valley.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 15, 2001
A musical retelling of Lindbergh ordeal Anne Morrow Lindbergh's death last week brought the 1932 kidnapping and murder of her infant son, Charles Lindbergh Jr., back into the news. And a new musical about that event, "Lindbergh Baby Kidnapped," will make its world premiere at the Theatre Project tomorrow. Written by New York composer, lyricist and librettist Kenneth Allen Vega, the multimedia musical features a cast of nine re-enacting events ranging from the 1932 kidnapping to the 1936 execution of convicted kidnapper Bruno Richard Hauptmann.
NEWS
July 5, 1997
GREAT ACTORS never appear to be acting. Jimmy Stewart so comfortably played his roles that movie audiences could easily convince themselves that he really was Jefferson Smith ("Mr. Smith Goes to Washington") or George Bailey ("It's a Wonderful Life") or Charles Lindbergh ("The Spirit of St. Louis") or Elwood P. Dowd ("Harvey"). Once Mr. Stewart appeared on the screen with his western Pennsylvania drawl and occasional stammer, no matter the scene or subject, the audience could relate.As distinctive as was this tall man with the immediately recognized voice, he had the uncanny ability to make people see him as one of their own. He was the quintessential American, whether playing a cowboy, a baseball player, a musician, a reporter, or an amiable imbiber whose best friend is an invisible 6-foot rabbit.
NEWS
December 7, 1997
Anne Morrow Lindbergh (1906 - )was married to American aviator Charles Lindbergh, who in 1927 made the historic first solo flight across the Atlantic. She has written two memoirs of flying with her husband, "North to the Orient" and "Listen! The Wind," two books of poetry and a popular book of essays on women's themes, "Gift from the Sea." The Lindberghs' life was shadowed by the tragic kidnapping and death of their infant son. Sensitive and introverted, Anne Lindbergh wrote in her diaries about the effort to reconcile the demands of being a wife and mother much in the public eye with her own needs as a writer.
NEWS
December 20, 1991
Charles A. Levine, who became aviation's first trans-Atlantic passenger in 1927 when he sponsored an attempt to beat Col. Charles A. Lindbergh to Europe, died Dec. 6 in Washington after a brief illness. Mr. Levine flew into history with Clarence D. Chamberlin at the controls of a 225-horsepower monoplane.They lost the race to be the first to fly the Atlantic when a suit filed by one of Mr. Chamberlin's would-be co-pilots marooned the Columbia in its hangar.
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