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By Lou Cedrone | May 6, 1991
It's true. They don't make them the way they used to. But that doesn't completely dispel the original impression that the 1960 ''Spartacus'' lumbered more than it shook. And adding an expunged five minutes (making a total of 197) to the restored version doesn't necessarily mean it is that much better.The film is big. The climactic battle scenes, employing some 8,000 soldiers, were shot in Spain, and this much is awesome. The final hour of the film, in fact, is absorbing, almost gripping, but there are those others hours to endure, and at times, they look like so much ''Hercules'' footage, despite the presence of some impressive names, among them Laurence Olivier, Kirk Douglas, Peter Ustinov, Charles Laughton, Jean Simmons and Tony Curtis.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 12, 2003
Big Ethel's out there. Pat Moran's gonna find her. Moran, Baltimore's own Emmy-winning casting director (for Homicide: Life On the Street) is in the midst of casting John Waters' latest, A Dirty Shame, a timeless comedy of sexual addiction and amnesia-induced depravity. She's filled about 20 roles so far - about 40 percent of what's required (not including some 600 extras) - but her biggest challenge remains. "We're looking for a white woman to play the role of Big Ethel, Tracey Ullman's [character's]
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 3, 1991
'Spartacus'Starring Kirk Douglas, Laurence Olivier, Charles Laughton and Jean Simmons.Directed by Stanley Kubrick.Released by Universal.Rated PG-13.*** 1/2 "Spartacus," lovingly restored from its decay and now splashed across a big screen at the Westview, has this message for our times: Freedom's just another word for everything worth dying for.It's a madly romantic celebration of the spirit of liberation, a dream-state recapitulation of an episode in...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 15, 2002
NEW YORK - Can you perform cosmetic surgery on an adored 100-year-old and still keep her recognizable to the loved ones? The grande dame in question is the venerable Algonquin Hotel, the neo-Renaissance literary landmark and sometime intellectual oasis that was haven to the witerati of the fabled Round Table. The new owners of the hotel, which turned 100 last month, are sprucing up for the centennial. The transformation goes beyond the new six-foot-wide oil painting of the Round Table acolytes, which was installed in the lobby restaurant, replacing a smaller 1998 painting removed by the previous owners.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 12, 2003
Big Ethel's out there. Pat Moran's gonna find her. Moran, Baltimore's own Emmy-winning casting director (for Homicide: Life On the Street) is in the midst of casting John Waters' latest, A Dirty Shame, a timeless comedy of sexual addiction and amnesia-induced depravity. She's filled about 20 roles so far - about 40 percent of what's required (not including some 600 extras) - but her biggest challenge remains. "We're looking for a white woman to play the role of Big Ethel, Tracey Ullman's [character's]
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1997
A good story's a good story, which explains why TNT's "The Hunchback" makes for an enjoyable two hours.But Victor Hugo's "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" is a great story, full of sex and violence and pathos and parties and religion and tolling bells and did I mention sex and violence?So why isn't "The Hunchback," which premieres at 8 p.m. tomorrow (with repeats at 10 p.m. and midnight), better than good?Probably because the story has been adapted to the screen so many times, and done so well.
NEWS
By NEIL A. GRAUER | October 29, 1992
Advocates of better television for children are outraged -- and with reason. Local television programmers across the country have tried to duck their responsibilities under the federal Children's Television Act by palming off such animated piffle as ''The Jetsons'' and ''GI Joe'' as ''educational'' shows for youngsters.Yet the anger of children's television activists ought not to be aimed at animated cartoons, per se, since cartoons -- at least the witty, high-quality little masterpieces from animation's golden age -- indeed can be educational.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 15, 2002
NEW YORK - Can you perform cosmetic surgery on an adored 100-year-old and still keep her recognizable to the loved ones? The grande dame in question is the venerable Algonquin Hotel, the neo-Renaissance literary landmark and sometime intellectual oasis that was haven to the witerati of the fabled Round Table. The new owners of the hotel, which turned 100 last month, are sprucing up for the centennial. The transformation goes beyond the new six-foot-wide oil painting of the Round Table acolytes, which was installed in the lobby restaurant, replacing a smaller 1998 painting removed by the previous owners.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | September 13, 1995
He's the man with the $6 million feet. He's also "Dr. Tune," a specialist in curing Broadway-bound musicals of whatever ails them.These days, Tommy Tune is functioning in both capacities. By night, he shows off his Lloyd's of London-insured, size 13 feet as a tap-dancing street performer in "Buskers." By day, he brings his Tony Award-winning wisdom and experience to rehearsals, as "Buskers' " creative team reworks and fine tunes the show during the cross-country, pre-Broadway tour that brings it to the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre tonight.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 29, 1996
Audiences at Center Stage's production of Bertolt Brecht's "Galileo" will find something different in the program. For the first time, the theater is dedicating a production to an individual.That individual is Baltimorean T. Edward Hambleton, who produced the first American production of "Galileo" in 1947. The production starred Charles Laughton, who was also responsible for the English language version -- the one Center Stage is using."I don't think people have any idea of how large his career has been in the American theater," Center Stage artistic director Irene Lewis says of Hambleton, 85, who is regarded as a pioneer of off-Broadway theater.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1997
A good story's a good story, which explains why TNT's "The Hunchback" makes for an enjoyable two hours.But Victor Hugo's "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" is a great story, full of sex and violence and pathos and parties and religion and tolling bells and did I mention sex and violence?So why isn't "The Hunchback," which premieres at 8 p.m. tomorrow (with repeats at 10 p.m. and midnight), better than good?Probably because the story has been adapted to the screen so many times, and done so well.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 29, 1996
Audiences at Center Stage's production of Bertolt Brecht's "Galileo" will find something different in the program. For the first time, the theater is dedicating a production to an individual.That individual is Baltimorean T. Edward Hambleton, who produced the first American production of "Galileo" in 1947. The production starred Charles Laughton, who was also responsible for the English language version -- the one Center Stage is using."I don't think people have any idea of how large his career has been in the American theater," Center Stage artistic director Irene Lewis says of Hambleton, 85, who is regarded as a pioneer of off-Broadway theater.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | September 13, 1995
He's the man with the $6 million feet. He's also "Dr. Tune," a specialist in curing Broadway-bound musicals of whatever ails them.These days, Tommy Tune is functioning in both capacities. By night, he shows off his Lloyd's of London-insured, size 13 feet as a tap-dancing street performer in "Buskers." By day, he brings his Tony Award-winning wisdom and experience to rehearsals, as "Buskers' " creative team reworks and fine tunes the show during the cross-country, pre-Broadway tour that brings it to the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre tonight.
NEWS
By NEIL A. GRAUER | October 29, 1992
Advocates of better television for children are outraged -- and with reason. Local television programmers across the country have tried to duck their responsibilities under the federal Children's Television Act by palming off such animated piffle as ''The Jetsons'' and ''GI Joe'' as ''educational'' shows for youngsters.Yet the anger of children's television activists ought not to be aimed at animated cartoons, per se, since cartoons -- at least the witty, high-quality little masterpieces from animation's golden age -- indeed can be educational.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | May 6, 1991
It's true. They don't make them the way they used to. But that doesn't completely dispel the original impression that the 1960 ''Spartacus'' lumbered more than it shook. And adding an expunged five minutes (making a total of 197) to the restored version doesn't necessarily mean it is that much better.The film is big. The climactic battle scenes, employing some 8,000 soldiers, were shot in Spain, and this much is awesome. The final hour of the film, in fact, is absorbing, almost gripping, but there are those others hours to endure, and at times, they look like so much ''Hercules'' footage, despite the presence of some impressive names, among them Laurence Olivier, Kirk Douglas, Peter Ustinov, Charles Laughton, Jean Simmons and Tony Curtis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 3, 1991
'Spartacus'Starring Kirk Douglas, Laurence Olivier, Charles Laughton and Jean Simmons.Directed by Stanley Kubrick.Released by Universal.Rated PG-13.*** 1/2 "Spartacus," lovingly restored from its decay and now splashed across a big screen at the Westview, has this message for our times: Freedom's just another word for everything worth dying for.It's a madly romantic celebration of the spirit of liberation, a dream-state recapitulation of an episode in...
FEATURES
By New York Times | June 14, 1991
NEW YORK -- Oh no, you're thinking, another big English musical import is coming to Broadway. But no-o-o-o-o-o: it's a big American musical about England, and it'll star Tommy Tune.The show's called "Busker Alley," a two-acter about buskers -- strolling entertainers."Busker Alley" is inspired by the 1938 movie "St. Martin's Lane," which starred Charles Laughton and Vivien Leigh. The show's music and lyrics are by Richard M. and Robert B. Sherman, who won Academy Awards for the music for "Mary Poppins."
NEWS
July 17, 1996
Pandro S. Berman, 91, who during a career that spanned four decades produced such acclaimed films as "Top Hat," "Morning Glory" and "The Blackboard Jungle," died Saturday.Mr. Berman died of congestive heart failure at his home in Beverly Hills, said grandson Cory Schaffel.The casts of Mr. Berman's films were a who's who of Hollywood from the 1930s through the '60s: Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, Katharine Hepburn, Bette Davis, Elizabeth Taylor, Gene Kelly and Sidney Poitier. Mr. Berman began his studio career at age 18.His many films ranged from the 1930s Astaire-Rogers dance favorites "The Gay Divorcee," "Swing Time" and "Shall We Dance," to Katharine Hepburn's Oscar-winning performance in "Morning Glory," and "Of Human Bondage," the 1934 drama that made Bette Davis a star.
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