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NEWS
August 10, 2008
On August 4, 2008, Charles Howard Short, Funeral from the Gregory J. Gonce Funeral Home, P.A., 169 Riviera Drive, Pasadena, on Wednesday at 11:30 A.M. Family requests friends visit on Tuesday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M.
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NEWS
September 19, 2009
On September 16, 2009, CHARLES HOWARD ANDREWS (BUD); beloved husband of Anna Andrews (nee Sica); devoted father of Barbara Andrews. Also survived by many nieces, nephews, family and friends. A memorial mass will be held at a later date and time. If desired, donations may be made to The American Lung Association.
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NEWS
September 19, 2009
On September 16, 2009, CHARLES HOWARD ANDREWS (BUD); beloved husband of Anna Andrews (nee Sica); devoted father of Barbara Andrews. Also survived by many nieces, nephews, family and friends. A memorial mass will be held at a later date and time. If desired, donations may be made to The American Lung Association.
NEWS
August 10, 2008
On August 4, 2008, Charles Howard Short, Funeral from the Gregory J. Gonce Funeral Home, P.A., 169 Riviera Drive, Pasadena, on Wednesday at 11:30 A.M. Family requests friends visit on Tuesday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M.
NEWS
January 4, 2005
On December 31, 2004 BRENDA SUE MEILE of Halethorpe, MD, devoted wife of Charles Howard Meile, Jr., beloved mother to the late Barbara Tully and stepmother of Charles Howard Meile III and Kathleen Marie Meile; loving granddaughter of the late Mary Ellen Harrison. Also survived by one brother and two sisters. Friends may call LOUDON PARK FUNERAL HOME, 3620 Wilkens Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21229 on Tuesday, January 4 and Wednesday, January 5 from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 P.M. A Funeral service will be held at Halethorpe Relay United Methodist Church, 4513 Ridge Avenue, Halethorpe, MD 21227 on Thursday, January 6 at 11 A.M. Interment Loudon Park Cemetery.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Paul Moran and Paul Moran,Newsday | July 20, 2003
Life was never this good when the horse known as I Two Step Too earned his oats running in races as far from the bright lights and big city as a thoroughbred racehorse gets. After all those years in the company of other four-legged broken dreams, reminded each time he would race in places like Boise, Stampede Park and the Montana State Fair that he was, as they say, "not much stock," his luck had taken a sudden turn for the better. Only last summer, he was slugging it out regularly, running hard, not fast, for small money at Les Bois Park in Idaho, and up for sale each time he ran. Then suddenly, I Two Step Too was a movie star on location, traveling first-class to Kentucky and Hollywood.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser | October 20, 2002
Laura Hillenbrand's book, Seabiscuit: An American Legend, remains perched for the 59th week on The New York Times best-seller list. It is being translated into 14 languages. And now, the colorful story of the Depression-era racehorse is being made into a movie. Filming started Monday, and the movie is scheduled for release by Christmas 2003. Hillenbrand, who lives in Washington, has served as a consultant, discussing the rags-to-riches story with the screenwriter as well as the actors.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 23, 2003
In an era when "crowd-pleasing" has become a disparaging term because of smash hits content to push sadistic or sentimental buttons, Seabiscuit dares to be great. This adaptation of Laura Hillenbrand's nonfiction best seller will move large audiences to applause and tears while deepening their feelings for the mysteries of character, the majesty of athletics and the thrill of our democratic culture at its best, when figures from nowhere become true popular champions. Boldly echoing the trajectory of the legendary racehorse who learned how to channel his herky-jerky energy into a fierce and indomitable running style, the movie starts out with an unusual gait, cutting among the individual stories of three men who took an unlikely animal from neglect to acclaim as a four-legged hero of the Depression.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 21, 1996
Charles Preston Howard Jr., a Baltimore lawyer and civil rights activist who was prominent in city and national legal groups, died Dec. 14 of a heart attack at his home in the city's Ashburton section. He was 75.Mr. Howard began practicing law in 1955, after earning his law degree in 1954 from Howard University Law School and an international law degree in 1955 from New York University.A muscular man with broad shoulders and a bone-crushing handshake, he quickly developed a reputation as a fearless and colorful defense lawyer.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2001
Through three centuries, Doughoregan Manor has stood watch over its domain, a sprawling estate so mysterious that some Howard County neighbors don't know it exists - and so valuable that developers can't stop thinking about it. Now, its clock is ticking down. About 275 years old, with 20 rooms, a private chapel and a long, tree-lined drive, the country home of founding father Charles Carroll is Maryland's answer to Mount Vernon and Monticello. And it has something neither of those landmarks can claim - it is the only home of a Declaration of Independence signer still in family hands.
NEWS
January 4, 2005
On December 31, 2004 BRENDA SUE MEILE of Halethorpe, MD, devoted wife of Charles Howard Meile, Jr., beloved mother to the late Barbara Tully and stepmother of Charles Howard Meile III and Kathleen Marie Meile; loving granddaughter of the late Mary Ellen Harrison. Also survived by one brother and two sisters. Friends may call LOUDON PARK FUNERAL HOME, 3620 Wilkens Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21229 on Tuesday, January 4 and Wednesday, January 5 from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 P.M. A Funeral service will be held at Halethorpe Relay United Methodist Church, 4513 Ridge Avenue, Halethorpe, MD 21227 on Thursday, January 6 at 11 A.M. Interment Loudon Park Cemetery.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 23, 2003
In an era when "crowd-pleasing" has become a disparaging term because of smash hits content to push sadistic or sentimental buttons, Seabiscuit dares to be great. This adaptation of Laura Hillenbrand's nonfiction best seller will move large audiences to applause and tears while deepening their feelings for the mysteries of character, the majesty of athletics and the thrill of our democratic culture at its best, when figures from nowhere become true popular champions. Boldly echoing the trajectory of the legendary racehorse who learned how to channel his herky-jerky energy into a fierce and indomitable running style, the movie starts out with an unusual gait, cutting among the individual stories of three men who took an unlikely animal from neglect to acclaim as a four-legged hero of the Depression.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Paul Moran and Paul Moran,Newsday | July 20, 2003
Life was never this good when the horse known as I Two Step Too earned his oats running in races as far from the bright lights and big city as a thoroughbred racehorse gets. After all those years in the company of other four-legged broken dreams, reminded each time he would race in places like Boise, Stampede Park and the Montana State Fair that he was, as they say, "not much stock," his luck had taken a sudden turn for the better. Only last summer, he was slugging it out regularly, running hard, not fast, for small money at Les Bois Park in Idaho, and up for sale each time he ran. Then suddenly, I Two Step Too was a movie star on location, traveling first-class to Kentucky and Hollywood.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser | October 20, 2002
Laura Hillenbrand's book, Seabiscuit: An American Legend, remains perched for the 59th week on The New York Times best-seller list. It is being translated into 14 languages. And now, the colorful story of the Depression-era racehorse is being made into a movie. Filming started Monday, and the movie is scheduled for release by Christmas 2003. Hillenbrand, who lives in Washington, has served as a consultant, discussing the rags-to-riches story with the screenwriter as well as the actors.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2001
Through three centuries, Doughoregan Manor has stood watch over its domain, a sprawling estate so mysterious that some Howard County neighbors don't know it exists - and so valuable that developers can't stop thinking about it. Now, its clock is ticking down. About 275 years old, with 20 rooms, a private chapel and a long, tree-lined drive, the country home of founding father Charles Carroll is Maryland's answer to Mount Vernon and Monticello. And it has something neither of those landmarks can claim - it is the only home of a Declaration of Independence signer still in family hands.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 21, 1996
Charles Preston Howard Jr., a Baltimore lawyer and civil rights activist who was prominent in city and national legal groups, died Dec. 14 of a heart attack at his home in the city's Ashburton section. He was 75.Mr. Howard began practicing law in 1955, after earning his law degree in 1954 from Howard University Law School and an international law degree in 1955 from New York University.A muscular man with broad shoulders and a bone-crushing handshake, he quickly developed a reputation as a fearless and colorful defense lawyer.
FEATURES
By Susan Campbell and Susan Campbell,HARTFORD COURANT | July 17, 2003
STRATFORD, Conn. - The cool evening mist doesn't penetrate the ground beneath this beech tree in Stratford. Near here, monk parakeets native to South America, the descendants of long-ago escapees, have built their intricate nests. This is a favorite walk of Stratford poet Norah Pollard. She enjoys the juxtaposition of craggy fishermen and women on a nearby dock and the delicate green birds meant for cages. The beech's trunk is covered with whirls and folds that look, says the poet, like body sex-parts.
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