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NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 24, 2006
Still reeling from the death of anchorman Peter Jennings and the loss since last year of nearly a million viewers, ABC will aim the network's flagship World News Tonight in a new direction. Beginning Monday, Good Morning America co-host Charles Gibson will be at the helm and current co-anchor Elizabeth Vargas will leave the evening newscast. ABC's moves, announced yesterday, signal an acute departure from the course initially set by News President David Westin, who in December named Vargas, 43, and Bob Woodruff, 44, as Jennings' successors, dubbing them co-anchors "for the digital age."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2012
Seeing HBO's latest trailer for "Game Change," the made-for-TV version of the 2008 GOP presidential campaign with John McCain and Sarah Palin, brought back memories of the early days of Z on TV when I was doing media-and-politics 24/7 -- and loving it. Check out the trailer, which includes the moment in Palin's interview with ABC's Charlie Gibson when she said she could see Russia from Alaska. And then, check out some of my on-the-run, review of the interview posted about 15 minutes after part one of the Gibson-Palin sitdown aired.
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NEWS
By MATEA GOLD and MATEA GOLD,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 25, 2006
NEW YORK -- Charles Gibson is still getting used to the idea of being in charge. The veteran newsman has plenty of experience in anchoring ABC's evening newscast (he's been filling in since at least 1998) but when he officially took the helm of World News Tonight at the end of May, he found that it required some adjusting. As a substitute anchor, "it was a little bit like being a grandparent: You could play with the baby and enjoy it and have a terrific time, and if you screwed up, you were always going to be able to give the kid back," he said on a recent afternoon on the set in the bustling newsroom.
NEWS
February 2, 2012
xxxABC anchorman Charles Gibson came across as a stern, no-nonsense senior professor putting a graduate student through a tough exam in the first part of his interview with Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin. It was round one of a three-part interview that will air on the network through tomorrow night, and you had to give it as a split decision to Gibson. But he was far from perfect, and he clearly received a lot of help from the way the interview was edited. The usually genial Gibson was firm and authoritative without being hectoring as he and the Republican vice presidential candidate sat stiffly knees to knees in leather chairs discussing God, national security and the possibility of military action against Russia if it invades Georgia again.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 5, 1999
Out with the new, and in with the old.That's the plan, as of yesterday anyway, at ABC News for reviving its troubled "Good Morning America" show.In a major overhaul, two anchors and an executive producer were dumped yesterday to be replaced on an interim basis starting Jan. 18 by former "GMA" host Charles Gibson and Diane Sawyer, of the "20/20" newsmagazine. Sawyer's return to mornings, where she worked as co-host of "CBS This Morning" from 1981 to 1984, is one of the more surprising turns taken of late by the revolving chairs at the morning show.
NEWS
September 16, 2008
Gibson's ambush very unfair to Palin Charles Gibson's interview (or should I say interrogation?) of Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin wasn't just bad; it was a poorly executed ambush. Mr. Gibson deliberately tried to intimidate Mrs. Palin (although it didn't work) by leaning so far forward in his chair that his partisan nose was smack in her face. It was a disgraceful, shameless, aggressive and unnecessary attack. What became painfully obvious during this so-called interview was that the media do not and have not treated Sen. Barack Obama and Sen. Joe Biden in the same fashion they have treated Mrs. Palin.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 9, 2005
The death of newsman Peter Jennings from lung cancer could affect the future of television news programs on every network and cable station, as well as test ABC's resourcefulness and judgment as it moves toward naming his successor as the anchor on its flagship World News Tonight. Jennings, whose death on Sunday came only months after the retirement of both CBS' Dan Rather and NBC's Tom Brokaw, was the last network anchor to have been welcomed every evening into tens of millions of American homes, and whenever national emergencies arose.
NEWS
February 2, 2012
xxxABC anchorman Charles Gibson came across as a stern, no-nonsense senior professor putting a graduate student through a tough exam in the first part of his interview with Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin. It was round one of a three-part interview that will air on the network through tomorrow night, and you had to give it as a split decision to Gibson. But he was far from perfect, and he clearly received a lot of help from the way the interview was edited. The usually genial Gibson was firm and authoritative without being hectoring as he and the Republican vice presidential candidate sat stiffly knees to knees in leather chairs discussing God, national security and the possibility of military action against Russia if it invades Georgia again.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun television critic | July 8, 2007
For more than two decades, discussions of TV news have been dominated by a discourse of decline. No statistic has been quoted more often than that of network evening newscasts collectively losing 27 million viewers - roughly half their audience - across a 25-year span starting in 1980. But for all the talk of dinosaurs and audience erosion, major TV news programs - such as PBS' The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer and Tim Russert's Meet the Press on NBC - have found new life on computer screens, iPods and cell phones during the past year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2012
Seeing HBO's latest trailer for "Game Change," the made-for-TV version of the 2008 GOP presidential campaign with John McCain and Sarah Palin, brought back memories of the early days of Z on TV when I was doing media-and-politics 24/7 -- and loving it. Check out the trailer, which includes the moment in Palin's interview with ABC's Charlie Gibson when she said she could see Russia from Alaska. And then, check out some of my on-the-run, review of the interview posted about 15 minutes after part one of the Gibson-Palin sitdown aired.
NEWS
September 16, 2008
Gibson's ambush very unfair to Palin Charles Gibson's interview (or should I say interrogation?) of Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin wasn't just bad; it was a poorly executed ambush. Mr. Gibson deliberately tried to intimidate Mrs. Palin (although it didn't work) by leaning so far forward in his chair that his partisan nose was smack in her face. It was a disgraceful, shameless, aggressive and unnecessary attack. What became painfully obvious during this so-called interview was that the media do not and have not treated Sen. Barack Obama and Sen. Joe Biden in the same fashion they have treated Mrs. Palin.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun television critic | July 8, 2007
For more than two decades, discussions of TV news have been dominated by a discourse of decline. No statistic has been quoted more often than that of network evening newscasts collectively losing 27 million viewers - roughly half their audience - across a 25-year span starting in 1980. But for all the talk of dinosaurs and audience erosion, major TV news programs - such as PBS' The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer and Tim Russert's Meet the Press on NBC - have found new life on computer screens, iPods and cell phones during the past year.
NEWS
By MATEA GOLD and MATEA GOLD,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 25, 2006
NEW YORK -- Charles Gibson is still getting used to the idea of being in charge. The veteran newsman has plenty of experience in anchoring ABC's evening newscast (he's been filling in since at least 1998) but when he officially took the helm of World News Tonight at the end of May, he found that it required some adjusting. As a substitute anchor, "it was a little bit like being a grandparent: You could play with the baby and enjoy it and have a terrific time, and if you screwed up, you were always going to be able to give the kid back," he said on a recent afternoon on the set in the bustling newsroom.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 24, 2006
Still reeling from the death of anchorman Peter Jennings and the loss since last year of nearly a million viewers, ABC will aim the network's flagship World News Tonight in a new direction. Beginning Monday, Good Morning America co-host Charles Gibson will be at the helm and current co-anchor Elizabeth Vargas will leave the evening newscast. ABC's moves, announced yesterday, signal an acute departure from the course initially set by News President David Westin, who in December named Vargas, 43, and Bob Woodruff, 44, as Jennings' successors, dubbing them co-anchors "for the digital age."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 9, 2005
The death of newsman Peter Jennings from lung cancer could affect the future of television news programs on every network and cable station, as well as test ABC's resourcefulness and judgment as it moves toward naming his successor as the anchor on its flagship World News Tonight. Jennings, whose death on Sunday came only months after the retirement of both CBS' Dan Rather and NBC's Tom Brokaw, was the last network anchor to have been welcomed every evening into tens of millions of American homes, and whenever national emergencies arose.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1999
Peter Jennings and ABC may be getting all the ink, what with his planned 24-hour stint as host from Times Square and the network's roster of big-name correspondents reporting from all over the globe, but they're not the only game in town.If you plan to celebrate Y2K by plopping yourself in front of a television, you'll have no shortage of choices. Here's a look at how TV's major news-gathering organizations plan on covering the turnover of the millennial clock.ABC (WMAR, Channel 2) -- The alphabet network has the millennium bug bad."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1999
Peter Jennings and ABC may be getting all the ink, what with his planned 24-hour stint as host from Times Square and the network's roster of big-name correspondents reporting from all over the globe, but they're not the only game in town.If you plan to celebrate Y2K by plopping yourself in front of a television, you'll have no shortage of choices. Here's a look at how TV's major news-gathering organizations plan on covering the turnover of the millennial clock.ABC (WMAR, Channel 2) -- The alphabet network has the millennium bug bad."
NEWS
April 28, 2006
On April 27, 2006, RICHARD ARNOLD; beloved husband of Virginia Gibson, (nee Hartsock); devoted father of Donna Gardner, Carla Karagiannis and Roy Gibson; dear brother of William Gibson, Lois Ford, Margaret Dane, Reginald Gibson, Charles Gibson, Bernard Gibson, Catherine Vanness, Joanne Moffat and the late Evelyn Childs and Eleanor Kendt. Also survived by many grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Friends may call at the Bruzdzinski Funeral Home, P.A., 1407 Old Eastern Avenue, Essex, at Rt. 702, (beltway exit 36)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 5, 1999
Out with the new, and in with the old.That's the plan, as of yesterday anyway, at ABC News for reviving its troubled "Good Morning America" show.In a major overhaul, two anchors and an executive producer were dumped yesterday to be replaced on an interim basis starting Jan. 18 by former "GMA" host Charles Gibson and Diane Sawyer, of the "20/20" newsmagazine. Sawyer's return to mornings, where she worked as co-host of "CBS This Morning" from 1981 to 1984, is one of the more surprising turns taken of late by the revolving chairs at the morning show.
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