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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
Baltimore's own Charles S. Dutton, star of screens big ("Gothika") and small (Fox sitcom "Roc"), Emmy winner for directing HBO's "The Corner," returns to movie theaters this weekend with "Least Among Saints. " The film, from writer-director-star Martin Papazian, centers on an emotionally scarred war veteran suddenly having to play father-figure to an orphaned boy. Dutton, who said he remembers many friends who returned from Vietnam with emotional issues they never seemed able to stare down, plays a police officer sympathetic to the vet's plight.
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By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2013
The 80-year-old man killed in Northeast Baltimore on Monday - after a punch caused him to fall and hit his head, police said - was the inspiration for the 1990s TV show "Roc. " John Wood formed the basis for the lead character on the Fox show portrayed by Baltimore actor Charles S. Dutton. Dutton grew up in Wood's neighborhood, and in the show portrayed a trash worker who believed in an honest day's work and went beyond his means to help his neighbors. Wood retired as a Baltimore sanitation worker after more than 35 years, his wife said.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | July 21, 1992
Los Angeles -- "Roc" will make TV history next month when it becomes "Roc Live" and starts a full season of live telecasts. But Charles Dutton, the Baltimore actor who plays the Baltimore garbage man named Roc, was focusing on more mundane matters as he talked about going live yesterday as part of the fall preview press tour."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
Baltimore's own Charles S. Dutton, star of screens big ("Gothika") and small (Fox sitcom "Roc"), Emmy winner for directing HBO's "The Corner," returns to movie theaters this weekend with "Least Among Saints. " The film, from writer-director-star Martin Papazian, centers on an emotionally scarred war veteran suddenly having to play father-figure to an orphaned boy. Dutton, who said he remembers many friends who returned from Vietnam with emotional issues they never seemed able to stare down, plays a police officer sympathetic to the vet's plight.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1997
When Mira Sorvino won an Oscar a couple of years back, instead of a golden statuette, someone should have handed her a can of Raid. It could've been a useful reminder: "Mira, baby, you just won an Academy Award. You don't have to make Grade B horror movies about human-sized roaches anymore."Hard to figure what Sorvino ("Mighty Aphrodite") is doing in "Mimic," let alone the estimable Charles Dutton, the exotic Giancarlo Giannini or the exquisite F. Murray Abraham (also an Oscar winner). "Mimic" is not a movie that exactly showcases acting talent (although Dutton, as an MTA cop, comes closest with an energetic, comic turn)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2011
Common kept his cool last week — and his artistic faith. While controversy swirled around his appearance at the White House for a poetry reading, the rapper-actor was anchoring a movie in Baltimore that should quiet even those pundits who tried to paint him as a gangsta. With concentration and intensity, he was helping first-time writer-director Sheldon Candis and a superb ensemble flesh out a script that proves (among other things) that gangsterism doesn't pay. "LUV" — it stands for "Learning Uncle Vincent" — captures the turning point in the life of an 11-year-old boy named Woody (Michael Rainey Jr)
FEATURES
By Randi Henderson | August 26, 1991
John Wood just couldn't help himself.He knew it was coming, he'd seen it before. Yet as actor Charles Dutton -- playing a Baltimore trashman named Roc -- proclaimed his pride in his work, the smile that stole across Mr. Wood's face and the affirmative nod of his head were as inexorable as an ocean's tide."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 10, 2000
THE FOURTH installment of HBO's "The Corner" -- the six-part miniseries directed by Baltimore's own Charles Dutton -- aired Sunday night. Some charge that the drama paints a picture of Baltimore that is too grim and gritty. There are lessons to be learned from it, nonetheless. The most obvious lesson is that the baby boomer generation is almost solely responsible for America's drug nightmare. "The Corner" follows the addiction of Gary McCullough and his ex-wife, Fran Boyd, and shows how their plight affects their 15-year-old son, DeAndre McCullough.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1997
Kelly White stands in front of an audience in a classroom at Towson University and tries to read a sentence from Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" for the 10th time. Before she can get to the end of the sentence, C. Richard Gillespie stops her yet again."You are losing the sentence with the details in the middle," says Gillespie. "Let's try to hold on to the sentence."White nods and tries once again. This time she is going too fast, Gillespie tells her."You can't race through the details to hold on to the sentence," he says.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2000
Leonard A. Burke is shouting. He has to. Just a few feet behind him, a compactor is putting 1,000 pounds of pressure on a metal bed frame and bending it with the ease of a child twisting a paper clip. Whoever owned the frame and the rest of the household goods being destroyed promised to come get them at the city's "Down Under Yard" but never did. Now, the deadline has passed and a Department of Public Works crew has tossed the stuff into the compactor. Metal squeals under the pressure.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2011
Common kept his cool last week — and his artistic faith. While controversy swirled around his appearance at the White House for a poetry reading, the rapper-actor was anchoring a movie in Baltimore that should quiet even those pundits who tried to paint him as a gangsta. With concentration and intensity, he was helping first-time writer-director Sheldon Candis and a superb ensemble flesh out a script that proves (among other things) that gangsterism doesn't pay. "LUV" — it stands for "Learning Uncle Vincent" — captures the turning point in the life of an 11-year-old boy named Woody (Michael Rainey Jr)
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2000
Leonard A. Burke is shouting. He has to. Just a few feet behind him, a compactor is putting 1,000 pounds of pressure on a metal bed frame and bending it with the ease of a child twisting a paper clip. Whoever owned the frame and the rest of the household goods being destroyed promised to come get them at the city's "Down Under Yard" but never did. Now, the deadline has passed and a Department of Public Works crew has tossed the stuff into the compactor. Metal squeals under the pressure.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2000
After spending seven years in jail on weapons possession and manslaughter convictions in the early 1970s, Charles S. Dutton is wanted in court again. This time, though, it's not the police who are after him - it's his landscaper, who is suing him for more than $10,000 in unpaid bills. The actor and director of HBO's gritty dramas "First Time Felon" and "The Corner" is countersuing his claimant for $300,000 in damages. Dutton claims in court documents that Arbor Valley Landscape, an Ellicott City company he entrusted to care for his 30-acre estate in Marriottsville, kept sloppy billing records and deliberately overcharged him. To top it off, Dutton states, the company felled too many of his trees and caused his flowers to shrivel and die. Documents filed in May in Howard County Circuit Court state that Dutton has paid Arbor Valley $43,889 for its services since 1998.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 10, 2000
THE FOURTH installment of HBO's "The Corner" -- the six-part miniseries directed by Baltimore's own Charles Dutton -- aired Sunday night. Some charge that the drama paints a picture of Baltimore that is too grim and gritty. There are lessons to be learned from it, nonetheless. The most obvious lesson is that the baby boomer generation is almost solely responsible for America's drug nightmare. "The Corner" follows the addiction of Gary McCullough and his ex-wife, Fran Boyd, and shows how their plight affects their 15-year-old son, DeAndre McCullough.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff | April 16, 2000
Charles S. Dutton lives on a 30-acre "farmette" in Howard County, about 20 miles and who-knows-how-many worlds away from the streets of East Baltimore where he spent the first 20 years of his life. But those streets and those years will always be with Dutton. Especially now. Tonight, his latest project, a six-part miniseries titled "The Corner," makes its debut on HBO. Although reluctant at first, Dutton eventually signed on to direct the entire six-hour series. Part of the reason was the opportunity it gave him to work in his hometown.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1997
Kelly White stands in front of an audience in a classroom at Towson University and tries to read a sentence from Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" for the 10th time. Before she can get to the end of the sentence, C. Richard Gillespie stops her yet again."You are losing the sentence with the details in the middle," says Gillespie. "Let's try to hold on to the sentence."White nods and tries once again. This time she is going too fast, Gillespie tells her."You can't race through the details to hold on to the sentence," he says.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff | April 16, 2000
Charles S. Dutton lives on a 30-acre "farmette" in Howard County, about 20 miles and who-knows-how-many worlds away from the streets of East Baltimore where he spent the first 20 years of his life. But those streets and those years will always be with Dutton. Especially now. Tonight, his latest project, a six-part miniseries titled "The Corner," makes its debut on HBO. Although reluctant at first, Dutton eventually signed on to direct the entire six-hour series. Part of the reason was the opportunity it gave him to work in his hometown.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2000
After spending seven years in jail on weapons possession and manslaughter convictions in the early 1970s, Charles S. Dutton is wanted in court again. This time, though, it's not the police who are after him - it's his landscaper, who is suing him for more than $10,000 in unpaid bills. The actor and director of HBO's gritty dramas "First Time Felon" and "The Corner" is countersuing his claimant for $300,000 in damages. Dutton claims in court documents that Arbor Valley Landscape, an Ellicott City company he entrusted to care for his 30-acre estate in Marriottsville, kept sloppy billing records and deliberately overcharged him. To top it off, Dutton states, the company felled too many of his trees and caused his flowers to shrivel and die. Documents filed in May in Howard County Circuit Court state that Dutton has paid Arbor Valley $43,889 for its services since 1998.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1997
When Mira Sorvino won an Oscar a couple of years back, instead of a golden statuette, someone should have handed her a can of Raid. It could've been a useful reminder: "Mira, baby, you just won an Academy Award. You don't have to make Grade B horror movies about human-sized roaches anymore."Hard to figure what Sorvino ("Mighty Aphrodite") is doing in "Mimic," let alone the estimable Charles Dutton, the exotic Giancarlo Giannini or the exquisite F. Murray Abraham (also an Oscar winner). "Mimic" is not a movie that exactly showcases acting talent (although Dutton, as an MTA cop, comes closest with an energetic, comic turn)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 23, 1997
PASADENA, Calif. -- It's Sunday afternoon tea at the posh Ritz-Carlton Hotel, and an elderly German couple on holiday are chatting casually over the gentle clink of fine china when Charles "Roc" Dutton arrives, looks in the lounge area and then hurries off, accompanied by his publicist and an assistant."
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