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December 19, 2005
Dec. 19--1843: A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens, was first published in England. 1932: The BBC began transmitting to Australia. 1957: Meredith Willson's musical play The Music Man opened on Broadway. 1972: Apollo 17 splashed down in the Pacific, winding up the Apollo program.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2012
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be acquainted, another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: FROWZY Arising obscurely in British regional dialects, frowzy (pronounced FRAU-zee) originally meant "bad smelling," as the closely related word frowsty still does. It has since taken on the sense of "untidy," "scruffy," "neglected in appearance," and (of a place)
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NEWS
June 18, 2006
Until I Find You By John Irving Ballantine Books / 825 pages / $15.95 For those who can't get enough of John Irving, there is a great deal to have of him here in a humongous novel about a man born to a tattoo-artist mother and an absconding, church-organist father. "Irving remains loyal to his models, Charles Dickens, George Eliot and Thomas Hardy," Joan Mellen wrote here last year. "Fiction for Irving, as for those masters, is biography, the full life of a protagonist, engaging if also substantially flawed."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | michael.sragow@baltsun.com | December 18, 2009
Charles Dickens' sometime literary heir, John Irving, once noted, "Each Christmas, we are assaulted with a new [version of Dickens' "A Christmas Carol"]: indeed, we're fortunate if all we see is the delightful Alastair Sim." Robert Zemeckis' new digital version, starring Jim Carrey, is an assault, a horrible mismatch of technique and story. But the Sim version is a delight - and it's at the Senator for the holidays. Sim starred as Ebenezer Scrooge in a 1951 British production, written by Noel Langley (who co-wrote "The Wizard of Oz" and wrote and directed "The Pickwick Papers")
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2012
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be acquainted, another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: FROWZY Arising obscurely in British regional dialects, frowzy (pronounced FRAU-zee) originally meant "bad smelling," as the closely related word frowsty still does. It has since taken on the sense of "untidy," "scruffy," "neglected in appearance," and (of a place)
NEWS
By Michael Seidel and Michael Seidel,Newsday | December 19, 1993
Title: "A Christmas Carol"Author: Charles DickensPublisher: Yale UniversityLength, price: 139 pages, $30Title: "Charles Dickens' Christmas Ghost Stories"Editor: Selected and introduced by Peter HainingPublisher: St. Martin's PressLength, price: 256 pages, $19.95Title: "A Christmas Garland"Author: Max BeerbohmPublisher: Yale UniversityLength, price: 197 pages, $25The spirit of Christmas Present offers up three visions for the season: a facsimile manuscript of...
NEWS
May 31, 2004
Josie Carey, 73, a children's television pioneer who was an early collaborator with Fred Rogers, died Friday in Pittsburgh of complications from injuries sustained in a fall. She was the host of The Children's Corner, which aired in Pittsburgh from 1954 to 1961 and appeared on NBC for 39 weeks. In 1955, the show received a Sylvania Television Award honoring it as the nation's best local children's program. She later had children's shows in Pittsburgh and South Carolina. She wrote lyrics for 68 songs during the seven-year run of The Children's Corner, while Mr. Rogers, who went on to become a television icon on Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, wrote the music and stayed behind the scenes doing puppetry.
NEWS
By ERNEST F. IMHOFF | February 21, 1993
Some newspaper people remind me of Charles Dickens. They momentarily live in the best of times or the worst of times, as in the opening line of "A Tale of Two Cities."While they work on the planet, they must be covering the first, the last, the biggest, the best, the worst, the smallest, the loudest, the dirtiest or the smelliest thing ever.The subject today is hyperbole, or extravagant exaggeration. My own fingers have never typed such an odoriferous outrage, which is our second example today.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | July 24, 2006
Louise M. Epstein, who created a charitable foundation to address educational and philanthropic needs, died of cancer Thursday at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville, where she lived for the past seven years. She was 79. Born Louise Marietta Tillman in South Bend, Ind., and raised in Vienna on the Eastern Shore, she was a 1942 graduate of Dorchester High School, where she sang soprano in musical comedy productions. She played the piano until her death and sight-read scores, often with friends alongside singing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | michael.sragow@baltsun.com | December 18, 2009
Charles Dickens' sometime literary heir, John Irving, once noted, "Each Christmas, we are assaulted with a new [version of Dickens' "A Christmas Carol"]: indeed, we're fortunate if all we see is the delightful Alastair Sim." Robert Zemeckis' new digital version, starring Jim Carrey, is an assault, a horrible mismatch of technique and story. But the Sim version is a delight - and it's at the Senator for the holidays. Sim starred as Ebenezer Scrooge in a 1951 British production, written by Noel Langley (who co-wrote "The Wizard of Oz" and wrote and directed "The Pickwick Papers")
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun reporter | July 23, 2007
WARNING: If you haven't read Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, stop. Don't read even one more word. Really, we mean it. We're going to discuss how it ends. So if you don't want to know, STOP READING RIGHT NOW. If you forge ahead, secrets will be revealed. Of course he dies. The good usually do. And, as is so often the case, he dies far too young, so we mourn not only the life actually surrendered but the noble deeds left unperformed. No, no, gullible Reader, not Harry Potter - Severus Snape.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | July 24, 2006
Louise M. Epstein, who created a charitable foundation to address educational and philanthropic needs, died of cancer Thursday at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville, where she lived for the past seven years. She was 79. Born Louise Marietta Tillman in South Bend, Ind., and raised in Vienna on the Eastern Shore, she was a 1942 graduate of Dorchester High School, where she sang soprano in musical comedy productions. She played the piano until her death and sight-read scores, often with friends alongside singing.
NEWS
June 18, 2006
Until I Find You By John Irving Ballantine Books / 825 pages / $15.95 For those who can't get enough of John Irving, there is a great deal to have of him here in a humongous novel about a man born to a tattoo-artist mother and an absconding, church-organist father. "Irving remains loyal to his models, Charles Dickens, George Eliot and Thomas Hardy," Joan Mellen wrote here last year. "Fiction for Irving, as for those masters, is biography, the full life of a protagonist, engaging if also substantially flawed."
FEATURES
December 19, 2005
Dec. 19--1843: A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens, was first published in England. 1932: The BBC began transmitting to Australia. 1957: Meredith Willson's musical play The Music Man opened on Broadway. 1972: Apollo 17 splashed down in the Pacific, winding up the Apollo program.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ronald Hube and Ronald Hube,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 2, 2004
Berlin is such a picture-perfect small town, it belongs in a movie. And it was - twice. Berlin played the part of rural Hale in the 1999 film Runaway Bride, and a few years later it provided a setting for the movie Tuck Everlasting. Today until Sunday, the town will play itself - as it was 150 years ago - during its annual Victorian Christmas Weekend. And more holiday events are slated throughout the month. The birthplace of 19th-century naval hero Stephen Decatur, Berlin began as a small village in the 1790s.
NEWS
May 31, 2004
Josie Carey, 73, a children's television pioneer who was an early collaborator with Fred Rogers, died Friday in Pittsburgh of complications from injuries sustained in a fall. She was the host of The Children's Corner, which aired in Pittsburgh from 1954 to 1961 and appeared on NBC for 39 weeks. In 1955, the show received a Sylvania Television Award honoring it as the nation's best local children's program. She later had children's shows in Pittsburgh and South Carolina. She wrote lyrics for 68 songs during the seven-year run of The Children's Corner, while Mr. Rogers, who went on to become a television icon on Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, wrote the music and stayed behind the scenes doing puppetry.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | June 26, 1995
As if we don't have enough to worry about, now there is the question of Kevin Garnett's future.If you are the kind of lump who doesn't keep up with hot new controversies and haven't given any thought to Kevin's future, don't fret. There is still time. By next week, grave concerns for Kevin's future will be jumping out of your TV, news magazines and the papers.Actually, the grave concerns have already started. Some sportswriters can't resist being the first on their block to have wrinkled brows.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun reporter | July 23, 2007
WARNING: If you haven't read Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, stop. Don't read even one more word. Really, we mean it. We're going to discuss how it ends. So if you don't want to know, STOP READING RIGHT NOW. If you forge ahead, secrets will be revealed. Of course he dies. The good usually do. And, as is so often the case, he dies far too young, so we mourn not only the life actually surrendered but the noble deeds left unperformed. No, no, gullible Reader, not Harry Potter - Severus Snape.
FEATURES
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 24, 1997
LONDON -- It's not every University of Maryland English professor who finds his work ridiculed on the front page of a British newspaper. But then, few have ever courted controversy like William A. Cohen, whose book outlines a sexual reading of works by Charles Dickens.Cohen's "Sex Scandal: The Private Parts of Victorian Fiction," was panned by the Observer recently in an article headlined "Coded erotica of 'filthy' Dickens."The article claimed "The lunatics have taken over the asylum" of American academia, and went on to quote Dickens scholar John Sutherland of London University, who exclaimed: "Any ordinary Dickens fan reading Cohen will think he's a Martian."
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | June 26, 1995
As if we don't have enough to worry about, now there is the question of Kevin Garnett's future.If you are the kind of lump who doesn't keep up with hot new controversies and haven't given any thought to Kevin's future, don't fret. There is still time. By next week, grave concerns for Kevin's future will be jumping out of your TV, news magazines and the papers.Actually, the grave concerns have already started. Some sportswriters can't resist being the first on their block to have wrinkled brows.
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