Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCharles Darwin
IN THE NEWS

Charles Darwin

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2005
ELKTON - Charles Darwin and his intellectual descendants have taken a lashing here lately. With the Cecil County Board of Education about to vote on a new high school biology textbook, some school board members are asking whether students should be taught that the theory of evolution, a fundamental tenet of modern science, falls short of explaining how life on Earth took shape. "I'm not one of these people who believe Darwinism is protected by the Constitution," said board member William Herold, who has questioned the way evolution is taught in the county's five high schools.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 27, 2008
Heyday By Kurt Andersen Andersen's second novel is more than just a love story or a history lesson; it's a true novel of ideas. The protagonists visit a 19th-century health farm/cult, for example. The occasional historical figure - e.g., Charles Darwin - makes an appearance as well. There are shades of T.C. Boyle's The Road to Wellville, as well as aspirations toward E.L. Doctorow. But in the end, this second novel belongs to Andersen, a tale of bright, rambunctious, aspiring young people.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 2, 1995
DOWNE, England -- Charles Darwin's house is rotting away.There is wood worm in the study where he wrote "Origin of Species." His laboratory is a ruined pile of bricks. His beloved sand walk, used for exercise and thought, is muddy and #F overgrown.Does anyone care?A race is under way to raise $4.8 million and save the residence Darwin called Down House, his home from 1842 until his death in 1882. Scientists are speaking out to attract public attention to the cause. London's Natural History Museum is seeking to extract millions from the proceeds of Britain's National Lottery.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | January 3, 2007
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia -- This nation's first-ever lawsuit on Charles Darwin's theory of evolution began with a biology textbook, a bunch of bananas and a man dressed in a monkey suit. And it only got more tangled from there. The student who brought the case, saying the teaching of evolution offends her religion, has accused her school of trying to flunk her as punishment for speaking up. The principal has suggested that the girl and her family are not being driven by devout beliefs, but by a push for publicity.
NEWS
January 27, 2008
Heyday By Kurt Andersen Andersen's second novel is more than just a love story or a history lesson; it's a true novel of ideas. The protagonists visit a 19th-century health farm/cult, for example. The occasional historical figure - e.g., Charles Darwin - makes an appearance as well. There are shades of T.C. Boyle's The Road to Wellville, as well as aspirations toward E.L. Doctorow. But in the end, this second novel belongs to Andersen, a tale of bright, rambunctious, aspiring young people.
NEWS
By SUSAN BRINK and SUSAN BRINK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 26, 2006
"Wear a smile and you have friends; wear a scowl and you have wrinkles." - George Eliot Inspired by age-old literary wisdom, countless song lyrics and the 1872 musings of Charles Darwin, a very 2006 theory to treat depression has emerged. Why not turn that frown upside down - with a shot of Botox? By preventing the physical act of frowning, the muscle-paralyzing toxin just might ease depression. A small-scale pilot trial, published in the May 15 journal Dermatologic Surgery, found that Botox injected into frown lines around the mouth or in forehead furrows of 10 women eliminated depression symptoms in nine of them and reduced symptoms in the 10th.
NEWS
By ROBERT LEE HOTZ and ROBERT LEE HOTZ,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 13, 2006
The Reluctant Mr. Darwin: An Intimate Portrait of Charles Darwin and the Making of His Theory of Evolution David Quammen Why Darwin Matters: The Case Against Intelligent Design Michael Shermer Times Books - Henry Holt / 202 pages / $22 In the border war between science and faith, the doctrine of "intelligent design" is a sly subterfuge - a marzipan confection of an idea presented in the shape of something more substantial. As many now understand - and as a federal court ruled in December - intelligent design is the bait on the barbed hook of creationist belief, intended to sidestep legal restrictions on the teaching of religion in public-school science classes.
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | August 13, 2006
"He was born on Feb. 12, 1809," Sandra Herbert says of Charles Darwin, the person who has dominated her intellectual life since she was an undergraduate at Wittenberg University in Ohio over 40 years ago. "That's the same day in the same year as Abraham Lincoln," Herbert points out. "I don't know if Lincoln ever heard of Darwin - he probably did - but Darwin certainly heard of Lincoln. He was a big supporter of the North in the Civil War and Darwin's family was all very much anti-slavery."
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff | June 28, 1998
Predators and prey, the hunters and the hunted. In most of the world, living creatures fall into these two basic categories, with humans as the most fearsome predators of all.But there is one place on this planet where those distinctions are not so clear-cut -- and perhaps never will be.It's a land that has been seemingly unscathed by human development, a magical setting where sea lions come up and nuzzle your feet, birds will fly onto your fingers, and...
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | January 3, 2007
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia -- This nation's first-ever lawsuit on Charles Darwin's theory of evolution began with a biology textbook, a bunch of bananas and a man dressed in a monkey suit. And it only got more tangled from there. The student who brought the case, saying the teaching of evolution offends her religion, has accused her school of trying to flunk her as punishment for speaking up. The principal has suggested that the girl and her family are not being driven by devout beliefs, but by a push for publicity.
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | August 13, 2006
"He was born on Feb. 12, 1809," Sandra Herbert says of Charles Darwin, the person who has dominated her intellectual life since she was an undergraduate at Wittenberg University in Ohio over 40 years ago. "That's the same day in the same year as Abraham Lincoln," Herbert points out. "I don't know if Lincoln ever heard of Darwin - he probably did - but Darwin certainly heard of Lincoln. He was a big supporter of the North in the Civil War and Darwin's family was all very much anti-slavery."
NEWS
By ROBERT LEE HOTZ and ROBERT LEE HOTZ,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 13, 2006
The Reluctant Mr. Darwin: An Intimate Portrait of Charles Darwin and the Making of His Theory of Evolution David Quammen Why Darwin Matters: The Case Against Intelligent Design Michael Shermer Times Books - Henry Holt / 202 pages / $22 In the border war between science and faith, the doctrine of "intelligent design" is a sly subterfuge - a marzipan confection of an idea presented in the shape of something more substantial. As many now understand - and as a federal court ruled in December - intelligent design is the bait on the barbed hook of creationist belief, intended to sidestep legal restrictions on the teaching of religion in public-school science classes.
NEWS
By SUSAN BRINK and SUSAN BRINK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 26, 2006
"Wear a smile and you have friends; wear a scowl and you have wrinkles." - George Eliot Inspired by age-old literary wisdom, countless song lyrics and the 1872 musings of Charles Darwin, a very 2006 theory to treat depression has emerged. Why not turn that frown upside down - with a shot of Botox? By preventing the physical act of frowning, the muscle-paralyzing toxin just might ease depression. A small-scale pilot trial, published in the May 15 journal Dermatologic Surgery, found that Botox injected into frown lines around the mouth or in forehead furrows of 10 women eliminated depression symptoms in nine of them and reduced symptoms in the 10th.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2005
ELKTON - Charles Darwin and his intellectual descendants have taken a lashing here lately. With the Cecil County Board of Education about to vote on a new high school biology textbook, some school board members are asking whether students should be taught that the theory of evolution, a fundamental tenet of modern science, falls short of explaining how life on Earth took shape. "I'm not one of these people who believe Darwinism is protected by the Constitution," said board member William Herold, who has questioned the way evolution is taught in the county's five high schools.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff | June 28, 1998
Predators and prey, the hunters and the hunted. In most of the world, living creatures fall into these two basic categories, with humans as the most fearsome predators of all.But there is one place on this planet where those distinctions are not so clear-cut -- and perhaps never will be.It's a land that has been seemingly unscathed by human development, a magical setting where sea lions come up and nuzzle your feet, birds will fly onto your fingers, and...
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns and Michael K. Burns,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1998
GALAPAGOS ISLANDS, Ecuador -- Fortunately, a young Charles Darwin was prone to sea sickness, which prompted the biologist of the British survey ship Beagle to spend as much time ashore as possible.And that led to discoveries of animals on the Galapagos and on the South American mainland that inspired the Englishman's earth-shaking theories of evolution.Striking biological evidence of animal adaptation, divergence and evolution that he observed 160 years ago is still evident in this isolated volcanic archipelago in the Pacific Ocean, which is an Ecuadorean national park and an international research center.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns and Michael K. Burns,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1998
GALAPAGOS ISLANDS, Ecuador -- Fortunately, a young Charles Darwin was prone to sea sickness, which prompted the biologist of the British survey ship Beagle to spend as much time ashore as possible.And that led to discoveries of animals on the Galapagos and on the South American mainland that inspired the Englishman's earth-shaking theories of evolution.Striking biological evidence of animal adaptation, divergence and evolution that he observed 160 years ago is still evident in this isolated volcanic archipelago in the Pacific Ocean, which is an Ecuadorean national park and an international research center.
FEATURES
November 24, 2005
Almanac-- Nov. 24--1859: British naturalist Charles Darwin published On the Origin of Species, which explained his theory of evolution. 1971: Hijacker "D.B. Cooper" parachuted from a Northwest Airlines 727 over Washington state with $200,000 in ransom -- his fate remains unknown.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 2, 1995
DOWNE, England -- Charles Darwin's house is rotting away.There is wood worm in the study where he wrote "Origin of Species." His laboratory is a ruined pile of bricks. His beloved sand walk, used for exercise and thought, is muddy and #F overgrown.Does anyone care?A race is under way to raise $4.8 million and save the residence Darwin called Down House, his home from 1842 until his death in 1882. Scientists are speaking out to attract public attention to the cause. London's Natural History Museum is seeking to extract millions from the proceeds of Britain's National Lottery.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.