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By EDWARD GUNTS | January 2, 1994
As the New Year begins, hopes abound for Baltimore's Mount Royal cultural district. The Schmoke administration has embarked on a campaign to transform the Howard Street corridor into an "avenue of the arts." Architects from around the country are vying to design a performing arts center next to the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. "It's a natural," says Gov. William Donald Schaefer.But 10 blocks south of the cultural district, the picture isn't nearly so bright. Charles Center, the 33-acre renewal area that was the starting point for Baltimore's vaunted Renaissance, took a definite turn for the worse in 1993:* One Charles Center, the Mies van der Rohe-designed office tower that led the downtown building boom when it opened 32 years ago, went on the auction block after its owners defaulted on a $19.6 million mortgage.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | June 9, 2014
A unit of an international beauty company will relocate from Hanover to Baltimore City this summer, occupying nearly 15,000 square feet in a Charles Street building owned by attorney Peter Angelos. Kao USA Inc., a subsidiary of Japan-based KAO Corp., will bring nearly 70 employees to 100 N. Charles Street from its current Hanover offices, according to a news release. The new 15 th floor offices at One Charles Center are to serve as the headquarters for the Kao Salon Division, which manufactures and distributes products, including the Goldwell and KMS California brands.  "With the improvements and investments made within Baltimore's Inner Harbor and downtown business districts over the past several years, this area emerged as an attractive location for a leading health and beauty company," Trevor Attenborough, president and general manager of Kao Salon Division, said in a statement.
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BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | March 30, 1994
A legislative subcommittee yesterday cut $12 million from Gov. William Donald Schaefer's budget that was earmarked to buy One Charles Center, effectively killing talks aimed at the state buying the 22-story building to cut government agencies' rental bills.The move by the health and environment subcommittee of the House Appropriations Committee follows an earlier move by a Senate panel to kill the funding, meaning there is little chance the funding will be revived as the state's fiscal 1995 budget nears final form.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | January 7, 2014
A 25-story tower in downtown's Charles Center complex sold in December for $26.1 million to an Los Angeles company, real estate firm Cassidy Turley announced Tuesday. Cassidy Turley, which listed the 36 S. Charles Street property back in April, said the sale is a sign of a downtown office market that is rebounding after the Great Recession. The firm announced the $19.7 million sale of 201 North Charles Street in September and managing director Jonathan Carpenter said he expects another deal to close in early January.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | January 19, 1991
One of the original property owners in Baltimore's Charles Center renewal area has sold the last of its holdings there.Metropolitan Real Estate Investments, an affiliate of Metropolitan Life Insurance Co., announced this week that it sold the land beneath the One Charles Center office tower last month for an undisclosed sum.Metropolitan Life is affiliated with Metropolitan Structures, the builder that won a city competition to construct the 22-story office...
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | August 4, 1993
One Charles Center is the ultimate proof of the old saw about banks: If you owe the bank $1,000 and you don't have it, you have a problem. But if you owe one, say, $19.6 million, and you don't have it, the bank has a problem.But the problems that the 22-story office building at 100 N. Charles St. is likely to cause Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. only begin with the fact that the owner, First Capital Financial Corp. of Chicago, cannot repay a $19.6 million mortgage on the building that it took from Met Life in 1988.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J Mullaney and Timothy J Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | March 31, 1994
CSX Corp. said yesterday that it will stay at One Charles Center in downtown Baltimore, ending a widespread belief in the real estate community that the transportation giant was preparing to move an additional 500 jobs to Florida.The nation's biggest railroad, which formerly occupied the entire 320,000-square-foot building at 100 N. Charles St., signed a lease for 132,645 square feet of office space through the year 2000, said Kathy Burns, a CSX Transportation Inc. spokeswoman.Ms. Burns said CSX moved 545 workers to Jacksonville, Fla., in 1992 and 1993 as the company consolidated its railroad unit to a single headquarters.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | July 24, 1993
The owners of One Charles Center, the award-winning building that became ground zero of Baltimore's 30-year-old downtown renaissance, this month decided to give it back to its lender after the building's major tenant began moving out.One Charles Center, a 300,000-square-foot structure designed by the world-famous architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, will become the property of Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. of New York, which provided financing for a...
NEWS
November 17, 1997
WHEN ORIOLES OWNER Peter G. Angelos acquired One Charles Center a year ago, he bought more than a 22-story office tower. He bought the cornerstone of a 1950s revitalization campaign that produced the city's first modern office campus and paved the way for the transformation of the Inner Harbor.Just think: The 1961 groundbreaking for One Charles Center marked the first time since the late 1920s that a major building was under construction in downtown Baltimore.Mr. Angelos, a young lawyer and member of the City Council in those days, remembers all the excitement.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1996
Peter G. Angelos, who led a charge to restore local ownership to the Baltimore Orioles, has turned his attention to restoring downtown's first modern skyscraper to prominence.But the roughly $6 million he bid to buy the One Charles Center office tower will serve as more than Angelos' latest effort to revitalize the city: The 22-story building also will become a permanent home for his expanding law practice."One Charles Center has over the years lost its aura as one of downtown's premier buildings, in part because it has had a single tenant for so long," said Ted Hirsh, an Angelos attorney who handles the firm's real estate matters.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Baltimore has underbilled a downtown office tower owned by Orioles majority owner Peter G. Angelos by $390,000 in property taxes since 2011, government officials say - the most recent example of mistakes emerging from the city's Finance Department. Kevin Harris, a spokesman for Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, called the billing on One Charles Center an isolated error. But a sampling of tax records shows that the city has also undercharged the owners of two other commercial properties by more than $300,000 in the past four years because of similar errors.
NEWS
November 15, 2010
In recent days, The Baltimore Sun had three articles that should be read together: Proposed changes to slots law to attract a downtown casino ("Changes planned for Md. slots law"), the Greater Baltimore Committee's desire for a new sports arena and Convention Center expansion ("A sports arena at Inner Harbor?"), and the Travel Section's report on Travel + Leisure's survey showing Baltimore a poor destination, especially because of poor hotels and lack of entertainment ("Survey finds Baltimore not too charming")
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 21, 2010
Norman V. Waltjen Jr., a retired attorney who had been the law partner of former Gov. William Donald Schaefer, died of congestive heart failure Sunday at Union Memorial Hospital. The former Homeland resident was age 89. Born in Baltimore and raised in Ednor Gardens, he attended the old Mount Washington Country School for Boys and was a 1938 graduate of Loyola High School, where he played ice hockey. He earned a degree at Loyola College and while a student, took flying lessons at the old Curtiss-Wright Airport in Mount Washington.
TRAVEL
By Edward Gunts | ed.gunts@baltsun.com | March 28, 2010
Warren Alfred Peterson, an architect and founding partner of one of the most highly regarded design teams in 20th-century Baltimore, died March 21 of complications from pneunomia in Jamestown, N.Y. He was 81. With Charles Brickbauer, Mr. Peterson in 1963 established Peterson and Brickbauer, a small but influential partnership whose buildings for corporate, institutional and residential clients gained attention and praise far beyond Maryland....
NEWS
January 2, 2010
On December 29, 2009, CATHERINE ANN SPARKES "CATHY" (nee Maxwell); beloved wife of George M. Sparkes; devoted daughter of Richard and Irene Maxwell; loving sister of Denise Wendler and her husband Kevin; aunt of Karl, Jennifer, and Bradley Wendler, and Katherine Sparkes; daughter-in-law of Alfred and Mary Sparkes; sister-in-law of Alfred Sparkes, Jr. Also survived by many other loving family members and friends. A Memorial Service will be held at the Schimunek Funeral Home Inc., 9705 Belair Road (at Forge Road)
NEWS
November 8, 2009
On November 5, 2009, Gerard "Jerry" C. Sauer A Memorial Service will be held at the family owned McComas Funeral Home, P.A., Abingdon, MD on Tuesday, November 10, 2009 at 7 p.m. Friends may call at the funeral home in Abingdon on Tuesday from 5 to 7 p.m. Those who desire may contribute to Johns Hopkins Children Center, 100 N. Charles Street, 1 Charles Center, Baltimore, MD 21201. Memory tributes may be sent to the family at mccomasfuneralhome.com.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | August 17, 1993
CB Commercial Real Estate Services Inc. has been awarded the job of leasing and managing the 22-story One Charles Center.Metropolitan Life, the mortgage holder, picked CB Commercial totake care of the 31-year-old landmark of the first stage of the city's redevelopment campaign.The property will change ownership today, when it goes up for auction at 2 p.m., and Metropolitan Life is expected to be the only bidder.James Kaplan, a Metropolitan Life executive in Washington who is helping to coordinate the auction, confirmed the award but did not provide details.
NEWS
November 19, 1997
WHEN CHARLES CENTER was built, architects wanted its two plazas to be like piazzas in the old Italian city of Siena -- centers of activity day and night. And for a while they succeeded.In 1970, the first City Fair brought more than 200,000 people to Center Plaza in a fun-filled exercise of civic harmony that gave Baltimore a badly needed boost of self-confidence two years after the trauma of race riots. Later, weekend ethnic festivals and concerts became popular events at Center and Hopkins plazas.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | September 10, 2009
Bernard Manekin, whose commercial real estate firm that he owned and operated with his brother for more than 50 years succeeded in transforming Baltimore's skyline and self-image, died Saturday in his sleep at his home in the St. James condominiums on North Charles Street. The longtime Northwest Baltimore resident was 95. "He was one of the original visionaries who made our Charles Center and ultimately the Inner Harbor a success. If he hadn't been able to lease One Charles Center in a poor economic climate, the whole project might have died right there," said Martin L. Millspaugh Jr., who was the first chief executive of Charles Center-Inner Harbor Management Inc., which oversaw the development in the 1960s of the harbor and what became Charles Center.
NEWS
August 4, 2009
On July 30, 2009, Leo Kahan, Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS., INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road at Mount Wilson Lane on Sunday, August 2 at 12 noon. Interment Baltimore Hebrew Cemetery, Berrymans Lane. In lieu of flowers contributions in his name may be made to U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, 100 Raoul Wallenberg Place, S.W., Washington, D.C., 20024-2126 or Johns Hopkins Myeloma Research, One Charles Center, 100 North Charles Street, Suite 234, Baltimore, MD 21201, or the charity of one's choice.
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