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By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,Sun Staff Writer | June 2, 1995
"The Glass Shield" was inspired by a true story, but one suspects that drama overtook its sense of realism. It doesn't matter. It's good drama -- a taut morality tale of police corruption and an engrossing mystery, too.Michael Boatman ("China Beach") stars as J.J. Johnson, an eager new cop who is the first black deputy assigned to his sheriff's station in Los Angeles. From the beginning, his chief (played with unsettling ambiguity by Richard Anderson) is on his back about every mistake, and J.J. makes plenty of them.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | February 8, 2008
A tribute to Charles Burnett, the profoundly humanistic director whose works reflect an African-American community far removed from the blaxploitation films made by his contemporaries, opens tomorrow at the American Film Institute's Silver Theatre in Silver Spring with his 1977 masterpiece Killer of Sheep. The film, done as his University of California, Los Angeles thesis, stars Henry G. Sanders as a working stiff at a slaughterhouse, struggling to connect with his family and make it through a typical day. Showtimes at the Silver, 8633 Colesville Road, are 5:30 p.m. tomorrow and Sunday, 7 p.m. Monday and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 11, 2007
Killer of Sheep is a miracle movie because it's receiving its first theatrical release 30 years after it was made and because, as a movie, it's miraculous. What makes Charles Burnett's vibrant depiction of life in L.A.'s Watts ghetto so universal is that it carries the emotional translucence of childhood into a raw adulthood. Killer of Sheep (Milestone) Starring Henry Gayle Sanders, Kaycee Moore, Charles Bracy, Angela Burnett. Directed by Charles Burnett. Unrated. Time 80 minutes.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 11, 2007
Killer of Sheep is a miracle movie because it's receiving its first theatrical release 30 years after it was made and because, as a movie, it's miraculous. What makes Charles Burnett's vibrant depiction of life in L.A.'s Watts ghetto so universal is that it carries the emotional translucence of childhood into a raw adulthood. Killer of Sheep (Milestone) Starring Henry Gayle Sanders, Kaycee Moore, Charles Bracy, Angela Burnett. Directed by Charles Burnett. Unrated. Time 80 minutes.
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By Lou Cedrone | October 26, 1990
There are a number of things wrong with ''To Sleep With Anger,'' but there are a number of good things about it, enough to encourage us to overlook the bad.The direction is unsteady, and the script is not that precise, but the acting is admirable, and it is most refreshing to see a film in which black people are simply people, living rather ordinary lives in a rather ordinary part of town. It is doubly refreshing to see that a film about blacks can steer far away from movie stereotypes.And no one overacts.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | February 8, 2008
A tribute to Charles Burnett, the profoundly humanistic director whose works reflect an African-American community far removed from the blaxploitation films made by his contemporaries, opens tomorrow at the American Film Institute's Silver Theatre in Silver Spring with his 1977 masterpiece Killer of Sheep. The film, done as his University of California, Los Angeles thesis, stars Henry G. Sanders as a working stiff at a slaughterhouse, struggling to connect with his family and make it through a typical day. Showtimes at the Silver, 8633 Colesville Road, are 5:30 p.m. tomorrow and Sunday, 7 p.m. Monday and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday.
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By John Carman and John Carman,SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE | February 21, 1998
Beautiful brides make for winning TV. So it's red-alert time when Halle Berry dons veil and dress in "Oprah Winfrey #i Presents: The Wedding."But who's the lucky groom?It's either her fiance (Eric Thal), a jazz pianist who's white and probably downwardly mobile, or a mysterious black suitor (Carl Lumbly) who's mounting a late campaign for her hand.Readers of the Dorothy West novel will know in advance. Anyone XTC else is apt to be kept guessing until the end of the two-part ABC miniseries, which airs tomorrow and Monday nights.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1998
Had Elmore Leonard written "Showgirls," the result could very well have been "The Players Club," an uneasy mix of raunch and redemption that's far from a great film, but sure is entertaining.Filled with oddball characters and enough street attitude to land a contract with Death Row Records, "The Players Club" ultimately fails because its characters are too stereotyped to be fresh and its heroine gets off way too easy. The result is a film not far removed from the blaxploitation flicks of the '70s, films that reveled in their badness (that applies to whichever meaning of "bad" you use)
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 4, 1990
He looks gigantic. He is gigantic. The only movie star who JTC currently rents out rooms in his house, all 6 foot 4 of him, now sits splayed and loose on sofa in a downtown hotel room, tie askew, legs up, watching some jocks hustle and scramble on the television. He looks like a regular guy, in fact, home from work, in those first relaxed moments before the tie comes off, when the weary body just wants to sag into something soft for a few minutes of downtime.If Danny Glover seems so much like a regular guy in person, then perhaps that's the largest part of his considerable charm on screen.
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By Michael Sragow | November 11, 2007
KILLER OF SHEEP The Charles Burnett Collection SHREK THE THIRD Paramount Home Video, Dreamworks / 29.99 Next to The Bourne Ultimatum, this summer's most satisfying three-peat, Shrek the Third, comes to DVD in all its slapstick glory. The best special feature is film of animators pitching sequences like a cross between silent clowns and standup comedians.michael.sragow@baltsun.com
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1998
Had Elmore Leonard written "Showgirls," the result could very well have been "The Players Club," an uneasy mix of raunch and redemption that's far from a great film, but sure is entertaining.Filled with oddball characters and enough street attitude to land a contract with Death Row Records, "The Players Club" ultimately fails because its characters are too stereotyped to be fresh and its heroine gets off way too easy. The result is a film not far removed from the blaxploitation flicks of the '70s, films that reveled in their badness (that applies to whichever meaning of "bad" you use)
FEATURES
By John Carman and John Carman,SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE | February 21, 1998
Beautiful brides make for winning TV. So it's red-alert time when Halle Berry dons veil and dress in "Oprah Winfrey #i Presents: The Wedding."But who's the lucky groom?It's either her fiance (Eric Thal), a jazz pianist who's white and probably downwardly mobile, or a mysterious black suitor (Carl Lumbly) who's mounting a late campaign for her hand.Readers of the Dorothy West novel will know in advance. Anyone XTC else is apt to be kept guessing until the end of the two-part ABC miniseries, which airs tomorrow and Monday nights.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,Sun Staff Writer | June 2, 1995
"The Glass Shield" was inspired by a true story, but one suspects that drama overtook its sense of realism. It doesn't matter. It's good drama -- a taut morality tale of police corruption and an engrossing mystery, too.Michael Boatman ("China Beach") stars as J.J. Johnson, an eager new cop who is the first black deputy assigned to his sheriff's station in Los Angeles. From the beginning, his chief (played with unsettling ambiguity by Richard Anderson) is on his back about every mistake, and J.J. makes plenty of them.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 4, 1990
He looks gigantic. He is gigantic. The only movie star who JTC currently rents out rooms in his house, all 6 foot 4 of him, now sits splayed and loose on sofa in a downtown hotel room, tie askew, legs up, watching some jocks hustle and scramble on the television. He looks like a regular guy, in fact, home from work, in those first relaxed moments before the tie comes off, when the weary body just wants to sag into something soft for a few minutes of downtime.If Danny Glover seems so much like a regular guy in person, then perhaps that's the largest part of his considerable charm on screen.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | October 26, 1990
There are a number of things wrong with ''To Sleep With Anger,'' but there are a number of good things about it, enough to encourage us to overlook the bad.The direction is unsteady, and the script is not that precise, but the acting is admirable, and it is most refreshing to see a film in which black people are simply people, living rather ordinary lives in a rather ordinary part of town. It is doubly refreshing to see that a film about blacks can steer far away from movie stereotypes.And no one overacts.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | April 11, 2007
The film that scored the biggest per-screen average in New York and Los Angeles last weekend ($15,864) wasn't Meet the Robinsons ($4,866) or Blades of Glory ($6,604). It was a 30-year-old underground classic about life in Los Angeles' Watts community in the mid-1970s: Killer of Sheep, the debut feature of Charles Burnett, who began the project as a graduate student. The Maryland Film Festival, which announces its schedule today, will give the movie, legendary among cineastes, its local premiere in May. The festival's guest programmer, Lodge Kerrigan, the director of Keane (2004)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2011
Matt Porterfield says we can credit Jean-Luc Godard's "Masculine-Feminine" (1966) for the interview structure of "Putty Hill. " He also says that Martin Bell's hard-to-find "Streetwise," about Seattle street kids, exerted a huge influence on his two films about youth: "'Streetwise' is a documentary that acts like a narrative, 'Putty Hill' is a narrative that acts like a documentary.'" But he also cited three other masterpieces, readily available on...
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