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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 7, 2003
It's a sad irony that the obituaries for Charles Bronson, who died eight days ago, focused on the stardom he achieved with the Death Wish series. In those films, Bronson plays a nonviolent Manhattan design consultant; he turns vigilante to avenge a deadly assault on his wife and daughter. Yet Bronson -- the son of a Lithu-anian coal-miner who, as a teen-ager, toiled in the mines himself -- made his name with world-class directors for bringing the vitality, the striving and the no-nonsense strength of America's working class to the screen.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | September 13, 2008
A posse full of soon-to-be-big-name movie stars comes out with guns a-blazing in John Sturges' 1960 The Magnificent Seven, airing at noon today on AMC. This tale of seven gunslingers (actually, six gun- and one knife-slinger) hired to protect a poor Mexican town from a band of nasty desperadoes is a classic for so many reasons: Elmer Bernstein's soaring score, Charles Lang's sparse cinematography, and a cast of then-unknowns, including Robert Vaughn, Charles Bronson and James Coburn (who plays Britt, the guy with the knife)
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 12, 1996
Give "Eye for an Eye" some credit for the originality it offers -- it's the first reactionary-feminist-vigilante picture to make it to the big screen. But if the idea of tiny, little Sally Field in the Charles Bronson part strikes you as a bit silly, that's only the beginning of the idiocies.Derived from a novel by Erika Holzer that I'd prefer to believe is subtler and more resonant, the story has been bleached of color and nuance until it's as black and white as an old-fashioned newspaper.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 7, 2003
It's a sad irony that the obituaries for Charles Bronson, who died eight days ago, focused on the stardom he achieved with the Death Wish series. In those films, Bronson plays a nonviolent Manhattan design consultant; he turns vigilante to avenge a deadly assault on his wife and daughter. Yet Bronson -- the son of a Lithu-anian coal-miner who, as a teen-ager, toiled in the mines himself -- made his name with world-class directors for bringing the vitality, the striving and the no-nonsense strength of America's working class to the screen.
NEWS
By Dennis McLellan and Dennis McLellan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 1, 2003
LOS ANGELES - Charles Bronson, the taciturn actor who became an international action star in Europe in the late 1960s and achieved major box-office success in America in the mid-1970s as the vengeance-seeking vigilante in Death Wish, has died. He was 81. Bronson, who reportedly suffered from Alzheimer's disease, died Saturday of pneumonia at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Originally cast in small parts as ethnic heavies in the early 1950s, Bronson emerged a decade later as a strong supporting actor in a trio of hit films with ensemble casts: The Magnificent Seven, The Great Escape and The Dirty Dozen.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | September 13, 2008
A posse full of soon-to-be-big-name movie stars comes out with guns a-blazing in John Sturges' 1960 The Magnificent Seven, airing at noon today on AMC. This tale of seven gunslingers (actually, six gun- and one knife-slinger) hired to protect a poor Mexican town from a band of nasty desperadoes is a classic for so many reasons: Elmer Bernstein's soaring score, Charles Lang's sparse cinematography, and a cast of then-unknowns, including Robert Vaughn, Charles Bronson and James Coburn (who plays Britt, the guy with the knife)
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | July 3, 1991
IT'S easy to see where all the money went in ''Terminator 2: Judgment Day.'' Arnold Schwarzenegger stars. By his own admission, the film cost $80 million, and most of that, apparently, went into the special effects.The money was well spent. These are very special special effects, but that's about all the film is, special effects.A sequel to the original ''The Terminator'' released in 1984, the new film is 2 hours and 14 minutes of car, truck, bike and anything else that crashes on the move.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | July 20, 2003
Talk about a gimmick that won't go away. Feature films shot in 3-D -- the ones for which you wear funny glasses, with the actors always reaching out from the screen -- have been around for more than 75 years, ever since an adventure flick called Power of Love (the tale of a sea captain in California during the 1840s) was released in 1922. Since then, they've had their Golden Age (the 1950s) and even a mini-resurgence (the early 1980s). But they've never become a cinematic staple; detractors insist they're silly, and some doomsayers have claimed they'll damage your vision (like sitting too close to the television, one supposes)
NEWS
December 15, 2002
Brad Dexter, 85, an actor who rode with Yul Brynner in The Magnificent Seven and became a confidant of Marilyn Monroe and Frank Sinatra, died Thursday in Rancho Mirage, Calif. He had been hospitalized with emphysema. Burly and handsome, he was often cast as a tough guy in supporting roles, which included 1958's Run Silent, Run Deep, starring Burt Lancaster and Clark Gable, and 1965's None but the Brave, starring Mr. Sinatra. He made his film debut in the The Asphalt Jungle in 1950, but his most prominent role came in 1960's The Magnificent Seven, in which he starred with Mr. Brynner, Steve McQueen, Charles Bronson and James Coburn.
NEWS
May 5, 2006
On May 3, 2006, BERNARD F.; beloved husband of Nancy (nee Bronson); devoted father of Mark A. Bronson; dear brother of Frank Custodero; loving grandfather of Caitlynn M. and Charles S. Bronson. Also survived by many nieces and nephews and friends. A Vigil Service will be held at the family owned Leonard J. Ruck, Inc Funeral Home, 5305 Harford Road (at Echodale) on Friday at 3:30 P.M. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated at St. Francis of Assisi Church on Saturday 9 A.M. Interment Most Holy Redeemer Cemetery.
NEWS
By Dennis McLellan and Dennis McLellan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 1, 2003
LOS ANGELES - Charles Bronson, the taciturn actor who became an international action star in Europe in the late 1960s and achieved major box-office success in America in the mid-1970s as the vengeance-seeking vigilante in Death Wish, has died. He was 81. Bronson, who reportedly suffered from Alzheimer's disease, died Saturday of pneumonia at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Originally cast in small parts as ethnic heavies in the early 1950s, Bronson emerged a decade later as a strong supporting actor in a trio of hit films with ensemble casts: The Magnificent Seven, The Great Escape and The Dirty Dozen.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | July 20, 2003
Talk about a gimmick that won't go away. Feature films shot in 3-D -- the ones for which you wear funny glasses, with the actors always reaching out from the screen -- have been around for more than 75 years, ever since an adventure flick called Power of Love (the tale of a sea captain in California during the 1840s) was released in 1922. Since then, they've had their Golden Age (the 1950s) and even a mini-resurgence (the early 1980s). But they've never become a cinematic staple; detractors insist they're silly, and some doomsayers have claimed they'll damage your vision (like sitting too close to the television, one supposes)
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 12, 1996
Give "Eye for an Eye" some credit for the originality it offers -- it's the first reactionary-feminist-vigilante picture to make it to the big screen. But if the idea of tiny, little Sally Field in the Charles Bronson part strikes you as a bit silly, that's only the beginning of the idiocies.Derived from a novel by Erika Holzer that I'd prefer to believe is subtler and more resonant, the story has been bleached of color and nuance until it's as black and white as an old-fashioned newspaper.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | July 3, 1991
IT'S easy to see where all the money went in ''Terminator 2: Judgment Day.'' Arnold Schwarzenegger stars. By his own admission, the film cost $80 million, and most of that, apparently, went into the special effects.The money was well spent. These are very special special effects, but that's about all the film is, special effects.A sequel to the original ''The Terminator'' released in 1984, the new film is 2 hours and 14 minutes of car, truck, bike and anything else that crashes on the move.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | January 10, 2009
The rare film to effectively combine humor and whiz-bang special effects (CGI and big budgets usually don't do funny well), Barry Sonnenfeld's 1997 Men in Black (7 p.m., TBS, repeats 9 p.m.) features the unlikely team of Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones as members of a super-secret government organization charged with keeping track of all the aliens among us. And by aliens, we mean real aliens, extraterrestrial beings with multiple heads, grotesque bodies (at least by our standards; I'm sure they're regarded as quite handsome on their home planets)
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | October 18, 2008
It's World War II all over again on TCM, spotlighting a trio of big-scale, big-budget, big-cast war epics. The first two hail from the early 1960s, when such films were all the rage. At 5:15 p.m., J. Lee Thompson's The Guns of Navarone (1961) features Gregory Peck, David Niven, Anthony Quayle, Anthony Quinn, Irene Papas and Richard Harris, all trying to rescue Greece from Axis domination by destroying a huge Nazi gun emplacement. At 8 p.m., Steve McQueen, James Garner, Richard Attenborough, Charles Bronson, Donald Pleasence and James Coburn are among those behind John Sturges' The Great Escape (1963)
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