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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2012
Johns Hopkins University professor Charles L. Bennett has been awarded the Gruber Foundation's annual cosmology prize for research he led that formed the foundation for what scientists know about the makeup, origins and expansion of the universe. Bennett led a team of two dozen researchers from across the country and globe that used NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe to study what conditions were like about 380,000 years after the birth of the universe. The probe launched in 2001, scanned space until 2010 for data on microwave radiation, said to be a remnant of the "big bang" that scientists say marked the birth of the universe.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2012
Johns Hopkins University professor Charles L. Bennett has been awarded the Gruber Foundation's annual cosmology prize for research he led that formed the foundation for what scientists know about the makeup, origins and expansion of the universe. Bennett led a team of two dozen researchers from across the country and globe that used NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe to study what conditions were like about 380,000 years after the birth of the universe. The probe launched in 2001, scanned space until 2010 for data on microwave radiation, said to be a remnant of the "big bang" that scientists say marked the birth of the universe.
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NEWS
April 6, 2008
On April 2, 2008, CHARLES BENNETT III, retiree from the Bush Street MTA Station, survived by a host of family and friends. Viewing will be held on Tuesday, April 8th from 3 to 7 PM at the family-owed and operated Howell Funeral Home, 4600 Liberty Heights Avenue. Funeral services will be held on Wednesday, April 9th. Wake from 11 to 12, funeral services to follow at the Howell Funeral Home Chapel, 4602 Liberty Heights Avenue. Interment King Memorial Park Cemetery.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
What lies at the center of that giant ball of gas we call Jupiter? When you cut through the incredibly dense atmosphere of Venus, what's happening on the planet surface? These are the questions that dance in the mind of Johns Hopkins University student Jessica Noviello. For her, they are not the idle musings of a child but a calling, pulling her life's path into space. "To think of being part of a mission that might answer things people have been wondering about for decades, that's very alluring," says Noviello, a sophomore from Smithtown, N.Y. Hopkins professors say this curiosity makes Noviello the perfect trailblazer for the university's new minor in space science and engineering.
NEWS
June 20, 1995
Harry Tisch, 68, a communist labor leader who became the first East German Politburo member put on trial after the Berlin Wall's fall, died of cancer Sunday. He led the 9-million-member East German labor federation for 14 years. He was arrested on corruption charges in December 1989 and convicted of spending $54,000 in union funds on private uses. He was sentenced to 18 months in prison in June 1991.Charles Bennett, 95, a screenwriter whose collaboration with Alfred Hitchcock breathed suspense into classics such as "The 39 Steps" and "The Man Who Knew Too Much," died Thursday in Los Angeles.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2004
The surviving suspect in the killing of Baltimore police Officer Brian D. Winder will no longer face a murder charge but, rather, far-lesser handgun violation charges that carry a maximum sentence of eight years, officials announced yesterday. A grand jury indicted Jermaine Gaines yesterday afternoon on those handgun charges after an investigation turned up substantial evidence that he was not criminally responsible for the July 3 killing, prosecutors said. Investigators have said that Charles Bennett, who was with Gaines, was solely to blame for the officer's death; Bennett killed himself this month as police closed in on him. "It's an absolute tragedy," said Margaret T. Burns, a spokeswoman for City State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy, "but [Gaines]
NEWS
November 13, 2005
When it comes to pondering fundamental questions about the nature of the universe, three scientists working at the Johns Hopkins University are among the leaders of the pack. It's a challenging race to be in these days, attempting to answer cosmic questions like the nature of the weak gravitational force that permeates the universe, or the "dark energy" that seems to be pushing the universe apart. CHARLES BENNETT "My research looks back to the dawn of time and the very earliest moments of the universe, where our two models of physics - gravity physics and quantum mechanics - break down and conflict with each other," said astrophysicist Charles Bennett.
NEWS
July 21, 1999
This month's question: What is the best advice you ever got?* Lois Smith of Eldersburg: "I was raised on a farm in Anne Arundel County, the youngest of six children. Mom always told us, `Life wasn't meant to BE EASY.' "* Jane Driver of Marriottsville: "Although I didn't exactly understand my grandmother's advice, `Willful waste makes woeful want,' when I was a little girl, through the years it has come to mean a lot."In every aspect of life, that old-fashioned expression rings true. I especially think of it today, 70 years later, as I observe the water ban."
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | November 13, 1991
Individuals can have a tremendous positive impact on the lives of others, but it doesn't always come naturally, Susan White-Bowden told agroup of almost 300 volunteers."
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Ryan Davis and Arthur Hirsch and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2004
The little gap in Baltimore police officer Brian D. Winder's front teeth showed mostly when he smiled, which was often enough. Detective Stanley Brandford can easily call up the mental picture of Winder out on the dance floor at a Saturday night wedding at the Preston Room downtown. As he recalls, the song was "Booty Call," and there was Winder smiling and looking so good out there that Brandford had to nudge his wife: Look at Brian. Brian can really dance. A week to the day -- and nearly the hour -- later, Winder was hit with three gunshots at a liquor store in the West Baltimore neighborhood where he grew up, which he chose not to entirely escape even as he encouraged others to try. A short time later he was pronounced dead at Maryland Shock Trauma Center: 36 years old, 10 years on the police force.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | February 15, 2009
Charles O. Bennett Jr., a retired Social Security Administration training officer who had served as pastor of Marriottsville United Methodist Church, died Monday of a stroke at Carroll Hospice's Dove House in Westminster. The Sykesville resident was 87. Dr. Bennett was born in Jamestown, N.D., and was raised there and in Montevideo, Minn. After earning a bachelor's degree from Concordia College in Moorhead, Minn., he entered the Army. After graduating from Officer Candidate School, he was assigned to the staff of Gen. Douglas MacArthur in the Pacific.
NEWS
June 27, 2008
On June 19, 2008, CHARLES BENNETT, JR.; survived by a host of family and friends. The family will receive friends on Friday, June 27, from 3-7 P.M. at the family owned and operated Howell Funeral Home, 4600 Liberty Heights Avenue. The Wake will be held on Saturday, June 28, 10 A.M. at the Pennsylvania Avenue A.M.E. Zion Church, 1128 Pennsylvania Ave., with funeral service to follow at 10:30. Interment Monday June 30, at Garrison Forest Veterans Cemetery. Inquiries 410-664-6800.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | June 26, 2008
Charles Reginald Bennett Jr., a retired maitre d' and World War II merchant marine veteran, died June 19 of emphysema at Sinai Hospital. The Forest Park resident was 87. Mr. Bennett was born in Baltimore and raised on Leadenhall Street. He attended city public schools. During World War II, he served as a cook aboard Liberty ships in Europe.
NEWS
November 13, 2005
When it comes to pondering fundamental questions about the nature of the universe, three scientists working at the Johns Hopkins University are among the leaders of the pack. It's a challenging race to be in these days, attempting to answer cosmic questions like the nature of the weak gravitational force that permeates the universe, or the "dark energy" that seems to be pushing the universe apart. CHARLES BENNETT "My research looks back to the dawn of time and the very earliest moments of the universe, where our two models of physics - gravity physics and quantum mechanics - break down and conflict with each other," said astrophysicist Charles Bennett.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2004
The surviving suspect in the killing of Baltimore police Officer Brian D. Winder will no longer face a murder charge but, rather, far-lesser handgun violation charges that carry a maximum sentence of eight years, officials announced yesterday. A grand jury indicted Jermaine Gaines yesterday afternoon on those handgun charges after an investigation turned up substantial evidence that he was not criminally responsible for the July 3 killing, prosecutors said. Investigators have said that Charles Bennett, who was with Gaines, was solely to blame for the officer's death; Bennett killed himself this month as police closed in on him. "It's an absolute tragedy," said Margaret T. Burns, a spokeswoman for City State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy, "but [Gaines]
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Ryan Davis and Arthur Hirsch and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2004
The little gap in Baltimore police officer Brian D. Winder's front teeth showed mostly when he smiled, which was often enough. Detective Stanley Brandford can easily call up the mental picture of Winder out on the dance floor at a Saturday night wedding at the Preston Room downtown. As he recalls, the song was "Booty Call," and there was Winder smiling and looking so good out there that Brandford had to nudge his wife: Look at Brian. Brian can really dance. A week to the day -- and nearly the hour -- later, Winder was hit with three gunshots at a liquor store in the West Baltimore neighborhood where he grew up, which he chose not to entirely escape even as he encouraged others to try. A short time later he was pronounced dead at Maryland Shock Trauma Center: 36 years old, 10 years on the police force.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
What lies at the center of that giant ball of gas we call Jupiter? When you cut through the incredibly dense atmosphere of Venus, what's happening on the planet surface? These are the questions that dance in the mind of Johns Hopkins University student Jessica Noviello. For her, they are not the idle musings of a child but a calling, pulling her life's path into space. "To think of being part of a mission that might answer things people have been wondering about for decades, that's very alluring," says Noviello, a sophomore from Smithtown, N.Y. Hopkins professors say this curiosity makes Noviello the perfect trailblazer for the university's new minor in space science and engineering.
NEWS
July 21, 1999
This month's question: What is the best advice you ever got?* Lois Smith of Eldersburg: "I was raised on a farm in Anne Arundel County, the youngest of six children. Mom always told us, `Life wasn't meant to BE EASY.' "* Jane Driver of Marriottsville: "Although I didn't exactly understand my grandmother's advice, `Willful waste makes woeful want,' when I was a little girl, through the years it has come to mean a lot."In every aspect of life, that old-fashioned expression rings true. I especially think of it today, 70 years later, as I observe the water ban."
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