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By Los Angeles Daily News | November 24, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Picture a woman in gardening garb, a smile on her face and telephone to her ear matter-of-factly telling the person on the other line that "He's in the garden."Is she talking about hubby? One looks through the woman's French doors to a garden with a freshly dug grave.This is the art of the late cartoonist Charles Addams, whose twisted look at life delighted readers for 60 years.Among his creations are the characters that serve as the basis of the television series "The Addams Family" from 1964 to 1966, an animated version in the 1970s and now the movie.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2012
It has all the weight and nutritional value of cotton candy. But "The Addams Family," the Broadway musical that has taken up temporary residence at the Hippodrome Theatre, adds up to a mildly entertaining package of song and shtick. Revised since its New York premiere, which received a drubbing from the press, the show provides a workable vehicle for the characters first immortalized by the Charles Addams cartoons and memorably brought to life by the 1960s TV series. Marshall Brickman and Rick Elice, who wrote the book, borrowed a well-used device to frame the musical — the comic collision of opposites.
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | November 22, 1991
The stories that Paramount was worried about its new film, ''The Addams Family,'' were apparently unfounded. The film, based on the characters created by cartoonist Charles Addams, works.The ''Addams Family'' is a funny send-up of those fabled cartoon characters. It was directed by Barry Sonnenfeld, who has never directed a film before (he was director of photography on a number of films, including ''Big'').The music, done by Marc Shaiman, is a definite asset. Shaiman has designed the score to underline and punctuate many of the gags in the film, most of which work.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2012
After a performance of "The Addams Family," the Broadway musical now playing at the Hippodrome Theatre, a tall, bald, mustachioed man went backstage to greet the cast - the original, the ultimate Gomez Addams, John Astin. Douglas Sills, who portrays the head of the spooky household in the musical, dropped to the floor and did an elaborate kowtow. "You're a hero," Sills said. "Thank you for passing the torch to us. " That torch was lit 48 years ago, when the "The Addams Family" series debuted, fleshing out the slightly spooky, thoroughly contented characters created by New Yorker cartoonist Charles Addams.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2012
"The Addams Family" seemed to have everything going for it when the musical opened on Broadway two years ago: a book by the creators of the mega-hit "Jersey Boys"; two exceedingly popular stars, Nathan Lane and Bebe Neuwirth; and a title known to trigger fond memories and finger-snaps from any number of people who recall the 1960s sitcom of the same name. Then the reviews hit. They were about as cheery as the facial expression on Lurch, butler in the deliciously abnormal Addams household.
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By Mike Lane | December 9, 1991
THE WORLD OF CHAS ADDAMS. Alfred A. Knopf. 305 pages. $30. MY FAVORITE Charles Addams cartoon depicts a woman racing across a sandy dune, chasing the shadow of what is obviously her husband being carried away by a huge bird. Hands cupped, she's shouting: "George! George! Drop the keys!"No, maybe that's not my favorite. Maybe it's the one where a poor soul is trying to end it all by sticking his head in the oven. Behind him, his landlady shouts: "Mr. Mitchell, you know you don't have kitchen privileges!"
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2012
After a performance of "The Addams Family," the Broadway musical now playing at the Hippodrome Theatre, a tall, bald, mustachioed man went backstage to greet the cast - the original, the ultimate Gomez Addams, John Astin. Douglas Sills, who portrays the head of the spooky household in the musical, dropped to the floor and did an elaborate kowtow. "You're a hero," Sills said. "Thank you for passing the torch to us. " That torch was lit 48 years ago, when the "The Addams Family" series debuted, fleshing out the slightly spooky, thoroughly contented characters created by New Yorker cartoonist Charles Addams.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2012
It has all the weight and nutritional value of cotton candy. But "The Addams Family," the Broadway musical that has taken up temporary residence at the Hippodrome Theatre, adds up to a mildly entertaining package of song and shtick. Revised since its New York premiere, which received a drubbing from the press, the show provides a workable vehicle for the characters first immortalized by the Charles Addams cartoons and memorably brought to life by the 1960s TV series. Marshall Brickman and Rick Elice, who wrote the book, borrowed a well-used device to frame the musical — the comic collision of opposites.
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By Stephen Hunter MOVIES Rip-roaring 'Mohicans' | September 26, 1992
VIDEO'Addams Family'fTC"The Addams Family" isn't a movie, it's a re-enactment of a few dozen brilliant Charles Addams New Yorker cartoons with some dim filler material. Still, the participants seem to be having an infectiously delicious time, particularly Anjelica Huston as Morticia, those blazing cheekbones turned to alabaster by the makeup. Raul Julia is just OK, and Christopher Guest is somewhat misused. PG-13. ** 1/2 . "The Last of the Mohicans" is beautiful and damned, a rip-roaring re-creation of the French and Indian War of 1757 as imagined by James Fenimore Cooper and reinvented by Michael "Miami Vice" Mann.
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By David J. Fox and David J. Fox,Los Angeles Times | August 22, 1991
HOLLYWOOD -- Around this time last year, it looked like the film of the Christmas season was going to be "The Godfather Part III." The late fall and Christmas 1990 lineup also included the expected heavyweight box-office contender "Rocky V" and "Awakenings," which featured the intriguing casting of Robin Williams and Robert De Niro.By year's end, the public had delivered its verdicts. The eagerly anticipated movies did not live up to expectations -- while "Dances With Wolves" became a major international success and "Home Alone" became the third highest-grossing film ever domestically.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2012
"The Addams Family" seemed to have everything going for it when the musical opened on Broadway two years ago: a book by the creators of the mega-hit "Jersey Boys"; two exceedingly popular stars, Nathan Lane and Bebe Neuwirth; and a title known to trigger fond memories and finger-snaps from any number of people who recall the 1960s sitcom of the same name. Then the reviews hit. They were about as cheery as the facial expression on Lurch, butler in the deliciously abnormal Addams household.
NEWS
By Mike Lane | December 9, 1991
THE WORLD OF CHAS ADDAMS. Alfred A. Knopf. 305 pages. $30. MY FAVORITE Charles Addams cartoon depicts a woman racing across a sandy dune, chasing the shadow of what is obviously her husband being carried away by a huge bird. Hands cupped, she's shouting: "George! George! Drop the keys!"No, maybe that's not my favorite. Maybe it's the one where a poor soul is trying to end it all by sticking his head in the oven. Behind him, his landlady shouts: "Mr. Mitchell, you know you don't have kitchen privileges!"
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By Los Angeles Daily News | November 24, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Picture a woman in gardening garb, a smile on her face and telephone to her ear matter-of-factly telling the person on the other line that "He's in the garden."Is she talking about hubby? One looks through the woman's French doors to a garden with a freshly dug grave.This is the art of the late cartoonist Charles Addams, whose twisted look at life delighted readers for 60 years.Among his creations are the characters that serve as the basis of the television series "The Addams Family" from 1964 to 1966, an animated version in the 1970s and now the movie.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | November 22, 1991
The stories that Paramount was worried about its new film, ''The Addams Family,'' were apparently unfounded. The film, based on the characters created by cartoonist Charles Addams, works.The ''Addams Family'' is a funny send-up of those fabled cartoon characters. It was directed by Barry Sonnenfeld, who has never directed a film before (he was director of photography on a number of films, including ''Big'').The music, done by Marc Shaiman, is a definite asset. Shaiman has designed the score to underline and punctuate many of the gags in the film, most of which work.
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By Judy Gerstel and Judy Gerstel,Knight-Ridder | November 12, 1991
NEW YORK -- Ooky spooky creepy kooky is not a vagrant sleeping under rags around the corner from the Mark Hotel, where the taxes on a suite with two beige marble bathrooms come to $346.50 a night.Ooky spooky is not even turning on the TV Saturday night and seeing radio shock-jock Howard Stern hosting "Lesbian Dating Game" with two busty blonds flanking a dour brunette.No.Spooky is 33-year-old producer Scott Rudin knowing in his bones that America craves a major attack of macabre and taking dead aim with a $30-million movie that's hot.It was Rudin's idea to make the deliciously malicious romp that is "The Addams Family," opening nationwide Nov. 22."
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 17, 2003
The promoters of the flip, zesty, 94-minute anthology known only as The Animation Show promise, in their ads, "additional films and surprises." That might be a sure-fire marketing tool in a town overflowing with cartoon geeks, but in most cities they'd be better off letting their sleekest, blackest cat out of the bag. Tim Burton's oft-celebrated, rarely seen 1982 short Vincent is this show's chief "surprise." Though it runs a mere six minutes, it's enough to restore faith in Burton's talents after his herky-jerky Planet of the Apes.
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