Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCharismatic
IN THE NEWS

Charismatic

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Bob Rubin and Bob Rubin,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 4, 1991
What it says about us can be debated, but there's no question sports figures have a special hold on the American public. A recent example was the way members of the Bush administration, including the Bushmeister himself, babbled like schoolboys in the presence of Ted Williams and Joe DiMaggio aboard Air Force One on the ride to the All-Star Game in Toronto.Here were the nation's true heavy hitters lining up for autographs from two septuagenarians whose most notable achievements occurred a half-century ago, and in a kid's game.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | September 2, 2014
I miss Bob Ehrlich. Seriously, I do. I realize the former governor shares space with me here on the Baltimore Sun's opinion pages; in terms of sheer column inches, I suppose Mr. Ehrlich the Pundit is never that far away. But I'm talking about Mr. Ehrlich the Politician. A dozen years have passed since Mr. Ehrlich first ran for governor, in 2002. He beat then-Democratic Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend that year. Along with his running mate, Michael Steele, Mr. Ehrlich seemed to have revived the Maryland Republican Party almost overnight.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | June 4, 1999
It's funny how a little winning can change perception.Three weeks ago, hardly anyone could have picked Charismatic out of a lineup of horses or humans. The former claiming horse had just won the Kentucky Derby, but got so little respect that he didn't even go off as the second choice in the Preakness, much less the favorite.Only one person on the ABC announce team, Jim McKay even picked Charismatic to win the Preakness, but now that he has, and stands a win in tomorrow's Belmont away from the Triple Crown, the network will ride him as hard as jockey Chris Antley during tomorrow's telecast (Channel 2, 4: 30 p.m.)
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2012
Baltimore's next police commissioner is walking through a west-side neighborhood with some of the community's most engaged residents, but that's not enough for Anthony W. Batts. He wants to talk to a teacher sipping coffee on her porch. He jogs across the street to greet an older woman standing on her front lawn. "Thank you for being involved," Batts tells the group giving him a tour of Bridgeview/Greenlawn. The charm offensive is meant to convince Baltimoreans that a law enforcement career spent on the West Coast has prepared him to police one of the most dangerous cities in the East.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1999
ELMONT, N.Y. -- When Silver Charm chugged toward the finish line two years ago in quest of the elusive Triple Crown -- only to lose in the final desperate strides -- the sporting world looked up and said: It can't get any better than that.It did.When Real Quiet staggered to the wire last year upon weary but determined legs, his lead diminishing in seeming slow motion -- and he lost the Triple Crown by a nose -- the sporting world looked up again and said: It can't get any better than that.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1999
A rags-to-riches story, Charismatic is not.Even though the chestnut colt drew little attention before his unexpected win in the Kentucky Derby, and his follow-up win in the Preakness, Charismatic's breeding heralds the makings of a champion.Shake the horse's family tree and roses, black-eyed Susans and carnations fall out. Secretariat. Bold Ruler. Northern Dancer. All winners of one or more Triple Crown races, with blue blood to boot."It's like a basketball player being descended from Bill Russell, Magic Johnson and Larry Bird," said Rick Waldman, a thoroughbred consultant in Lexington, Ky.Pedigreed to the hilt, Charismatic runs for the Triple Crown in today's Belmont Stakes.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 17, 1999
D. Wayne Lukas rubbed his hands along the glistening neck of the chestnut colt Charismatic. Yesterday, the morning after Charismatic won the Preakness, Lukas was pointing out the colt's similarities to Secretariat.The revered Secretariat is Charismatic's great-grandsire on his male side. Charismatic also boasts strong Secretariat influences on his female side.Before Lukas could get too far into the comparison, he and his audience, a small group of reporters, enjoyed a good laugh. Here they were at the Pimlico stakes barn comparing Charismatic to Secretariat when three months ago Lukas couldn't even dump the horse in a claiming race (a race in which all entrants are for sale for a set price)
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1999
ELMONT, N.Y. -- Charismatic's bid for a Triple Crown and his racing career ended yesterday in front of a record crowd at Belmont Park. His life nearly ended as well.After finishing third in the Belmont Stakes, the final leg of the three-race series for 3-year-olds known as the Triple Crown, Charismatic pulled up suddenly. His jockey Chris Antley jumped off, lost his balance and fell into the dirt. He struggled to his knees and reached for Charismatic's left front leg.The handsome chestnut colt, a near twin to his great-grandsire Secretariat, had broken two bones in his left front ankle.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | May 16, 1999
He left the starting gate as one of the most disrespected Kentucky Derby winners in history, and he crossed the finish line as a short-odds bet to deliver racing's first Triple Crown in 21 years.That's a real good day.A horse can't have a better one than Charismatic did yesterday at Pimlico.Bettors made him the fifth choice in the Preakness at 8-1 odds, wagering more money on four horses he beat in the Derby two weeks ago. Not since 1953 had a Derby winner gone off at odds that high in the Preakness.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 25, 1999
After his euphoric ride aboard Charismatic in the Preakness, Chris Antley thanked fellow jockey Gary Stevens, who rode Stephen Got Even, for letting Charismatic swing wide around the far turn and launch his winning move.Antley's comment prompted the Pimlico stewards, who enforce the rules of racing, to review tapes of the race and question both jockeys. Antley and Stevens are close friends. And it prompted Nicholas Di Tullo, a racing fan from Columbia, to write the Maryland Racing Commission.
NEWS
September 5, 2012
Democrats and Republicans can surely agree on one thing - if the presidential election were a popularity contest (which it isn't, as Al Gore famously observed when he ran against the affable George W. Bush), the current incumbent would be a shoo-in for reelection. No offense to Ann and Mitt Romney, but if there's one thing that Barack and Michelle Obama have, it's star power, a point made clear early in the Democratic National Convention. But President Obama isn't running for class president or Homecoming King.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2010
Making her first incursion into Maryland politics, former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin stirred up the gubernatorial race Wednesday with an unexpected endorsement of Republican businessman Brian Murphy in his long-shot primary challenge against former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. The former Republican vice presidential nominee, popular among GOP voters even as she polarizes the wider electorate, has spent the 2010 election cycle endorsing congressional and...
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | November 5, 2005
Evita, the long-running hit Broadway musical now at the Hippodrome about the life of Eva Peron, wife of Argentinian dictator Juan Peron, has special significance for Dr. George G. Udvarhelyi, the internationally renowned Johns Hopkins neurosurgeon. The physician was born and educated in Hungary, and he worked in the Underground against the Nazi occupation of his homeland during World War II. He barely managed to escape deportation to Siberia when the Russians took over. Udvarhelyi's odyssey, which would take him to Argentina as a young surgical resident, began on a spring-like day in February 1948 when he boarded a steamer in Genoa, Italy.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2004
WASHINGTON - The grass on the practice field just off Oklahoma Avenue is richly green, English green. In fact, with a heavy sky dominating the gray, misty morning a couple of days before Major League Soccer begins its regular season, the unfolding scene looks more suited to a London suburb, where soccer is life, than the field just across the street from RFK Stadium. There is a soccer team on the field, and the sidelines have disappeared beneath the feet of a media contingent usually seen around here only for the Washington Redskins.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 27, 2004
WASHINGTON - Sen. John Edwards likes to tell audiences on the presidential campaign trail, "I have been preparing for this fight my entire life." It is something his colleagues in the Senate have known practically since they met the handsome North Carolinian, who brought his courtroom-honed debating skills and homespun charisma to Washington in 1999. During Edwards' one-term Senate career, he has attracted attention more for his driving ambition and oratorical talent than for any legislative achievement or signature idea.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2003
Charges filed yesterday against Nathan A. Chapman Jr. threaten to end the career of a charismatic business leader who dreamed of creating "the black Merrill Lynch" and was held up as a role model for young African-Americans. Chapman, 45, was for a time one of the stars of a new wave of black investment professionals. Smart, energetic and handsome, he made a strong impression at Alex. Brown & Sons, the venerable Baltimore firm he joined in the early 1980s as one of its first African-American brokers.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 7, 1999
ELMONT, N.Y. -- Charismatic underwent successful surgery yesterday to stabilize broken bones in his left front ankle. The 3-year-old colt suffered the career-ending injury the day before in the Belmont Stakes as he sought to become racing's 12th Triple Crown winner.Veterinarians inserted four screws to realign the fetlock joint. Dr. Stephen J. Selway led the five-person team at the Belmont Equine Surgical Clinic at Belmont Park outside New York City."He'll be just fine," Selway said. "It was not the worst injury of this kind I've ever seen, but it was a nasty one."
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1999
ELMONT, N.Y. -- On a hot and steamy morning at historic Belmont Park, Charismatic walked off a large, shiny van and stepped onto New York soil yesterday for the first time in his life.A striking chestnut one victory from history's embrace, Charismatic entered the unknown attempting to do the near-impossible. On Saturday, in the 131st Belmont Stakes here at Belmont Park, Charismatic will try to sweep the Triple Crown, winning the Kentucky Derby, Preakness and Belmont the same year."This is one of the greatest things in sports, the Triple Crown," said Alex Hassinger Jr., the trainer of Patience Game, one of the dozen Belmont entrants.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis, Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Scott Calvert and Alec MacGillis, Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2002
Janet Harris doesn't care what the reporters beating a path to her one-room schoolhouse tell her. To her, John Allen Muhammad will always be the charming father who showed up in Antigua with his three cheerful children two years ago before disappearing a year later. They can say what they want on television, Harris said, but in her mind, Muhammad will never be a killer. "He was genuine. He was compassionate," said Harris, the principal of the Greensville Primary School in the Caribbean island's capital, St. John's, who was also Muhammad's landlord for several months.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.