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NEWS
By Jack W.Germond and Jules Witcover | January 22, 1992
Manchester, N. H.-- WHEN Sen. Bob Kerrey launched his candidacy for the Democratic presidential nomination, his supporters billed him as the next John F. Kennedy, complete with charisma. He was young, 48, boyish-looking and a Vietnam war hero whose exploits were at least a match for the PT-109 saga.In the following weeks, however, he seemed to turn the charisma spigot on and off, sometimes impressing crowds, more often leaving them lukewarm as he struggled to produce an effective message.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2013
I am going to be honest, I did not think Ray Lewis was going to be nearly as good on TV as he was on ESPN's "Sunday NFL Countdown Sunday" today. Frankly, some of the stuff Lewis said as a player sometimes sounded, well, a little off the wall. Like his comments last week about the power outage in the Super Bowl possibly being intentional. And I wondered how his incredible visceral intensity as a player would translate to the screen in a medium that favors cool. But after three hours of watching Lewis and his new TV teammates, I am here to tell you he had an outstanding debut.
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NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | November 15, 2006
Charisma was a big winner in last week's election. I'm talking about the old-fashioned kind of charisma: confidence-inspiring leadership born of skill and experience. The new kind of media-driven charisma was a loser. Take Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele. He was the brightest star of Election '06. His stage presence and his engaging television ads were the talk of the Maryland political world. Some polls showed him closing the gap on 10-term Congressman Benjamin L. Cardin. Mr. Cardin was seen as dull, and therefore vulnerable.
NEWS
By Charlotte Allen | November 26, 2012
The Republican Party has been doing a lot of hand-wringing and finger-pointing since the presidential election. Half the conservative columnists and bloggers say the GOP lost because it overemphasized social issues such as abortion and gay marriage. The other half says the party didn't emphasize them enough. And everyone denounces Project ORCA, the campaign's attempt to turn out voters via technology. But I've got a suggestion for cutting short the GOP angst: Sarah Palin for president in 2016.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 27, 1992
MINNEAPOLIS -- He wears a dowdy haircut, has a tendency to look awkward on a football field, and doesn't immediately remind anyone of, say, Terry Bradshaw.But when Mark Rypien revised his image last night, he wiped the slate clean.No more second-class labels for Rypien."I can understand the bit about me being an average-looking guy with a weak haircut," he said, "but I took a little exception to the charisma bit. I think I have a little charisma."Charisma is in the eye of the beholder. And what the nation saw last night at the Metrodome was a 29-year-old quarterback come into his own.Passing for 292 yards and two touchdowns, Rypien steered the Washington Redskins to a 37-24 victory over the Buffalo Bills in Super Bowl XXVI.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | March 15, 2005
MARYLAND'S SENIOR U.S. senator, Paul S. Sarbanes, found charisma worrisome. "Hitler had charisma," he once observed. Leadership for what, in other words. Mr. Sarbanes had the charisma that comes with substance and a passion to serve. Voters saw it, but somehow challengers didn't get it until they'd been trounced. His record speaks for itself: 18 election victories, no defeats. It's one of the things worth considering as the state turns to choosing his successor. Mr. Sarbanes announced last week that he's retiring after his fifth term ends next year.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | February 20, 1992
This woman's charging into the crowd like a blocking back. Senator, senator, she cries. The crowd in front of her does not move. The blocking back keeps plugging forward, but Paul Tsongas, chatting and signing autographs yesterday in the middle of Hopkins Plaza, does not hear her."Senator, senator," she cries again.She's waving a piece of paper in her hand. In front of her, Tsongas, fresh from his New Hampshire Democratic presidential primary win, is busy being adored. They want autographs, they want handshakes, they want to tell him about their American dreams that have gone bad the last 10 years.
NEWS
June 27, 1999
Politicians, lobbyists are feeding at the public troughThanks to The Sun for the wake-up call regarding Annapolis lobbyists' buying of our legislature ("Lobbying firm spared no expense," June 22) This is truly an outrage. While reading the article, the image of pigs at the trough came to mind."We the people" are supposed to run the country, but we've ceded that power to lobbyists who purvey football tickets, a night at a concert or a free meal. We have created a ruling class of career politicians and lobbyists who care and feed them.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | July 8, 2002
WASHINGTON - This Fourth of July and throughout the weekend that followed, PBS scheduled a fascinating look at our indispensable Founding Father, George Washington. The man many know only as the remote and austere face on the dollar bill was neither the most brilliant nor the most learned of the founders. He was not a military genius like Napoleon - in fact, he lost most of the battles he fought. And he was not a literary genius like Lincoln, whose words still move us. But by the end of this broadcast, if you have not already read Richard Brookhiser's superb book, you will understand and, yes, feel the greatness of the man. Washington may well be the greatest American who ever lived - and among the most admirable men of any time or place.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 7, 2000
IF I were an official with the state police or the State Highway Administration, I'd order road crews to leave Hon Man alone, and allow his "Hon" tag to stay on the welcome-to-Baltimore sign on the B-W Parkway. How many times do I have to say this? If I were Cal Ripken, I'd get up to bat in the All-Star game, hit a home run and announce my retirement. If I were William Donald Schaefer and I found it "difficult" to talk about taxing Web sales at a time when the economy is doing well and the state enjoys a budget surplus, then I wouldn't.
SPORTS
By Adam Testa | March 6, 2012
In last week's Smackdown recap , we talked about the implications the Internet has had on professional wrestling. If there's one other element of this business that has changed perception and execution in the industry, often for the worse, it's the "art" of the swerve or the not-so-subtle hints at steering speculation that direction. On Monday night's episode of Raw, Shawn Michaels returned to confront his friend Triple H about his match with the Undertaker at WrestleMania.
NEWS
By GARRISON KEILLOR | April 2, 2008
As our story continues, we find Senator McCain resting in his tent, plotting his fall campaign, as the Democrats continue the longest primary in human history, which has left the pundit club and the blogoswamp with nothing new to say whatsoever. You might as well write about your sock drawer. Hillary Clinton is a great woman and a leaden campaigner who makes even loyal supporters want to crawl behind the couch, and Barack Obama has lost his charisma - it wore off him like tread off a tire.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | July 23, 2007
It was an interesting choice to have Chicago rapper Lupe Fiasco and Oakland, Calif., soul singer Keyshia Cole share the main stage Saturday night at Artscape. Just two years ago, both generated almost deafening buzz before their debuts hit the streets. And each delivered albums that were refreshingly assured and focused. With Food & Liquor, Fiasco's critically acclaimed 2006 CD, the rapper brought a soulful flair to his wordy narratives, which delved into such varied topics as skateboarding and growing up without a dad. And on The Way It Is, Cole's platinum-selling 2005 CD, the singer-songwriter infused her brokenhearted soul ballads with no-nonsense hip-hop swagger, recalling early Mary J. Blige.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | November 15, 2006
Charisma was a big winner in last week's election. I'm talking about the old-fashioned kind of charisma: confidence-inspiring leadership born of skill and experience. The new kind of media-driven charisma was a loser. Take Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele. He was the brightest star of Election '06. His stage presence and his engaging television ads were the talk of the Maryland political world. Some polls showed him closing the gap on 10-term Congressman Benjamin L. Cardin. Mr. Cardin was seen as dull, and therefore vulnerable.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Matthew Hay Brown and Jennifer Skalka and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporters | October 22, 2006
As a teenager, Michael S. Steele was a natural on the stage. Tall and handsome, with a dazzling smile, he won parts in high school, college and summer-stock theater that allowed him to be the central figure, the star. But even when he failed to land the leads, Steele managed to make himself visible. "Somehow, he always found his way to the front," says Jim Mumford, Steele's former drama director at Archbishop Carroll High School in Washington. He was "so enthusiastic," Mumford says, "that, of course, you let him stay up there."
SPORTS
By MIKE KLINGAMAN AND EDWARD LEE and MIKE KLINGAMAN AND EDWARD LEE,SUN REPORTERS | March 24, 2006
At Maryland, Frese is making all the right moves Brenda Frese was dying to scream, stomp or pound her fist on the floor. Anything to fire up her basketball team as third-ranked Maryland muddled through its second-round game against St. John's in the NCAA women's tournament Tuesday night. There were the Terps, forcing silly turnovers and allowing easy layups - in short, playing like their male counterparts this season. But Frese, the Maryland coach, didn't lose her cool. There were no tirades, no getting in the players' faces, no outward expressions of frustration.
NEWS
By GARRISON KEILLOR | April 2, 2008
As our story continues, we find Senator McCain resting in his tent, plotting his fall campaign, as the Democrats continue the longest primary in human history, which has left the pundit club and the blogoswamp with nothing new to say whatsoever. You might as well write about your sock drawer. Hillary Clinton is a great woman and a leaden campaigner who makes even loyal supporters want to crawl behind the couch, and Barack Obama has lost his charisma - it wore off him like tread off a tire.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Sun reporter | May 16, 1999
On a sparkling spring afternoon at Pimlico , when the scary combined with the sublime, Charismatic captured the 124th Preakness Stakes yesterday before a record crowd of 100,311 and immediately set his sights on history. The gritty workhorse will attempt to become the 12th Triple Crown winner June 5 when he races in the Belmont Stakes at Belmont Park. No horse has won the Kentucky Derby , Preakness and Belmont since Affirmed in 1978.After stunning the sports world with a long-shot victory in the Derby, Charismatic became the third horse in the past three years to depart the Preakness with a chance for glory.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | March 15, 2005
MARYLAND'S SENIOR U.S. senator, Paul S. Sarbanes, found charisma worrisome. "Hitler had charisma," he once observed. Leadership for what, in other words. Mr. Sarbanes had the charisma that comes with substance and a passion to serve. Voters saw it, but somehow challengers didn't get it until they'd been trounced. His record speaks for itself: 18 election victories, no defeats. It's one of the things worth considering as the state turns to choosing his successor. Mr. Sarbanes announced last week that he's retiring after his fifth term ends next year.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2004
To understand what makes Courtney Kupets the best women's gymnast in the country, you have to stop the action. Look at photos of her on the uneven bars, the vault, even the 4-inch-wide balance beam. Upside down, right side up, somehow the two-time U.S. champion keeps her body as taut as an archer's bowstring. "She's the best. So strong, so straight. Others are very good, but she's picture perfect - literally. Everything is a straight line," says Paul Ziert, the publisher of International Gymnast magazine and former coach of two-time Olympic gold medalist Bart Conner.
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