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NEWS
By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,[McClatchy-Tribune] | October 18, 2006
Cooking Chop the leaves of chard and add them to the usual suspects, including pasta, omelets or lasagna. The tender greens can be prepared like spinach, while the crisp stalks should be chopped, steamed and cooked like asparagus.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette,
The Baltimore Sun
| July 15, 2013
With my husband out of a town, and full share from the Moon Valley Farm in my refrigerator, I decided to give myself a bold challenge: I would not do any additional grocery shopping this week, but find creative ways to use all the great vegetables and pantry items I already had. Because I am the kind of person who doesn't feel the need to eat certain kinds of foods at specific times of day, having to feed only myself seemed incredibly freeing....
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NEWS
By BILL DALEY and BILL DALEY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 8, 2006
Admit it, chard is kind of scary. With the vegetable's strong stems poking holes in your plastic grocery bag and leaves the size of a kitchen cutting board, the whole idea of wrestling the neon-veined chard into shape for a quick dinner seems impossible. But it can be done; simply separate the leaves from the stems (save stems for a future weekend use) and roughly chop the leaves into ribbons. Cook, covered, for five minutes in garlic-scented olive oil and the chard is ready. Sauteed chopped chard provides the muscle for this vegetarian one-dish pasta meal.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | March 11, 2010
More greens. Fewer cherry tomatoes. Those are the plans for the second season of Baltimore's City Hall garden, which produced more than 2,000 pounds of fresh produce last year for Our Daily Bread, the city's largest soup kitchen. "We're catering to what Our Daily Bread is requesting," said Bill Vondrasek, chief horticulturalist for the Department of Recreation and Parks, which helps care for the gardens. "They specifically told us what they will eat more of and what they didn't each much of," he said.
NEWS
July 30, 2008
A series to help you cook with the bounty of the season When Catonsville gardener Bill Richkus has a full range of summer vegetables ready all at once - from Swiss chard to onions to peppers - he whips up an easy stir-fry. It's quick and adaptable to what you have on hand. For the recipe, visit baltimoresun.com/backyardharvest
NEWS
June 25, 2003
On June 23, 2003, MILDRED G. ZACHARKO (nee Chard), beloved wife of Harry J. Zacharko, devoted mother of Harry J. Zacharko Jr. and wife Debbie, Michael C. Zacharko and wife Donna and Christopher R. Zacharko and Debbie, loving grandmother of Sarah M., Scott G., Natascha E. Alexandra M., and Ericka J. Zacharko, dear sister of Elizabeth McKay, Harriet and Robert Chard. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Catholic Burial Service will be held at the family owned Duda-Ruck Funeral Home of Dundalk Inc., 7922 Wise Ave., on Thursday at 9 A.M. Interment Oak Lawn Cemetery.
NEWS
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | July 27, 2003
Although I eat my share of meat, I often prefer vegetable-based entrees this time of the year. As an occasional vegetarian, I'm seduced by the variety of seasonal fruits and vegetables that beckon at summer farmers' markets. But this doesn't mean I'd be satisfied with a plate of steamed vegetables. Nor, I assume, would you. My preference is for a vegetarian main course that's a balance of vegetables, starches and seasonings that is filling, though not overwhelming. The combination of vegetables, cheese and pasta suits my appetite.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | March 10, 2002
This time of year, I start thinking about greens -- well, not just greens -- also reds, purples, limes, and oranges and pink-fringed blues. But they're all classified as greens. Rainbow chard, ruddy mustards, slate-blue kale, collards and a load of other cool-weather leafy things are among the first fresh garden-grown vegetables available. Seeded into the ground with happy anticipation in early spring (or in the case of kale and collards, with admirable foresight last fall), they beautifully fringe the empty perennial beds or clump together in a corner.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | November 25, 2006
Recently I came down with a bad case of laryngitis and a chest cold. The doctor told me to take it easy - he doesn't know me very well! - so for a few days I attempted to rest, read and recline. Gradually my voice returned, and I felt better. But when I looked at the calendar I noticed that we had out-of-town friends coming soon for dinner and to spend the night. Not feeling up to a big meal, I was worried about the menu. But then I remembered a delicious fall soup I had recently prepared for a Saturday lunch.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | January 25, 1993
Shortly after joining the Orioles, Harold Reynolds was asked for money by a woman wheeling a baby carriage in Baltimore. Reynolds had an appointment with the team doctor for a physical, but after brushing past the woman, he turned around."
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | June 15, 2009
Bridget McMahon - former vegetarian and current foodie - took red chard home for the first time last week. The very same day, Kelly Barner - homeless and so new to veggies that she calls asparagus a "prickly thing" - got her first look at the chard, too. The dark leafy greens with strawberry-red stems came to both women by way of a fast-growing program known as Community Supported Agriculture. CSAs, which number more than 12,500 nationwide, allow consumers to buy produce directly from local farms, and it's the farmer and the season that dictate which fruits and vegetables - and how much of them - are delivered each week.
NEWS
July 30, 2008
A series to help you cook with the bounty of the season When Catonsville gardener Bill Richkus has a full range of summer vegetables ready all at once - from Swiss chard to onions to peppers - he whips up an easy stir-fry. It's quick and adaptable to what you have on hand. For the recipe, visit baltimoresun.com/backyardharvest
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | November 25, 2006
Recently I came down with a bad case of laryngitis and a chest cold. The doctor told me to take it easy - he doesn't know me very well! - so for a few days I attempted to rest, read and recline. Gradually my voice returned, and I felt better. But when I looked at the calendar I noticed that we had out-of-town friends coming soon for dinner and to spend the night. Not feeling up to a big meal, I was worried about the menu. But then I remembered a delicious fall soup I had recently prepared for a Saturday lunch.
NEWS
By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,[McClatchy-Tribune] | October 18, 2006
Cooking Chop the leaves of chard and add them to the usual suspects, including pasta, omelets or lasagna. The tender greens can be prepared like spinach, while the crisp stalks should be chopped, steamed and cooked like asparagus.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,SUN REPORTER | May 3, 2006
Mexican Everyday By Rick Bayless With Deann Groen Bayless 101 Margaritas By Kim Haasarud Wiley / 2006 / $15.95 This book offers just what it advertises for your Cinco de Mayo celebration. Recipes are short and straightforward, with helpful salt or no-salt icons so you can choose the right libation at a glance. The Avocado-Cilantro Margarita (#80), flavored with lime juice and Grand Marnier, is billed as "the perfect accompaniment to chips and guacamole." But there's plenty of variety, including a strawberry margarita with a sugar rim and a hot chile margarita laced with Tabasco.
NEWS
By BILL DALEY and BILL DALEY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 8, 2006
Admit it, chard is kind of scary. With the vegetable's strong stems poking holes in your plastic grocery bag and leaves the size of a kitchen cutting board, the whole idea of wrestling the neon-veined chard into shape for a quick dinner seems impossible. But it can be done; simply separate the leaves from the stems (save stems for a future weekend use) and roughly chop the leaves into ribbons. Cook, covered, for five minutes in garlic-scented olive oil and the chard is ready. Sauteed chopped chard provides the muscle for this vegetarian one-dish pasta meal.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,SUN REPORTER | May 3, 2006
Mexican Everyday By Rick Bayless With Deann Groen Bayless 101 Margaritas By Kim Haasarud Wiley / 2006 / $15.95 This book offers just what it advertises for your Cinco de Mayo celebration. Recipes are short and straightforward, with helpful salt or no-salt icons so you can choose the right libation at a glance. The Avocado-Cilantro Margarita (#80), flavored with lime juice and Grand Marnier, is billed as "the perfect accompaniment to chips and guacamole." But there's plenty of variety, including a strawberry margarita with a sugar rim and a hot chile margarita laced with Tabasco.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN FOOD EDITOR | December 29, 2004
This is the season to fight the chilly weather with hot soups, braised meats and warm desserts. Diane Rossen Worthington, author of 14 cookbooks including The Taste of Summer, explores the dishes of fall and winter in her new book, The Taste of the Season (Chronicle Books, 2004, $24.95). Her goal, she says, is to follow up on her summer book with a book that celebrates the cool months through dishes that feature seasonal produce and could be served at the holiday table. Among the 75 or so recipes are Winter Frittata, which can be assembled in advance and served for a holiday brunch; Spicy Chicken Gumbo, which is perfect for a Super Bowl celebration; and a comforting Turkey Potpie with a Puff Pastry Crust, which would be a fine dinner to serve on a snowy evening.
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